St. Louis Board of Aldermen

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The St. Louis Board of Aldermen has become the latest entity to go on record opposing a new boulevard through portions of St. Louis County.

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A St. Louis alderwoman wants to keep people from sagging their pants in public. Marlene Davis introduced a bill Friday that would impose a fine of at least $100 for a violation. 

A violation is described as wearing pants below the waist, exposing the skin or undergarments which is quote “likely to cause affront or alarm.”

The topic may sound funny, but not all the aldermen are laughing. Alderman Antonio French says the bill inordinately targets young black men.

(via Flickr/robertelyov)

Here's something you probably don't know about the city of St. Louis - it's illegal to distribute or sell condoms unless you're a doctor or a pharmacist.

A law passed in 1934 says so.

But Alderman Shane Cohn says it's time for the city code to reflect reality. He introduced a measure today that reads, in its entirety:

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

A new economic development agreement between St. Louis City and County is a step closer to reality.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen moved a bill forward Thursday that would create a long-talked about partnership.

The bill’s sponsor, Alderman Fred Wessels of the 13th Ward, says it will create entity to serve businesses that want to move into the region.

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The St. Louis Board of Alderman is weighing into the ongoing debate over alleged misuse of taxpayer funds at the Missouri History Museum.

The BOA hopes to use its bully pulpit as leverage to improve transparency at the museum.

Members of the History Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its subdistrict commissioners were brought in to testify before the Board of Aldermen on issues ranging from, questionable land purchases, to compensation for former museum president Bob Archibald, to its use of taxpayer funds.

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen met today for the last time ahead of the mayoral and aldermanic elections in March and April. Here's what came out (and didn't) of a hectic day at City Hall:

Foreclosure mediation

Aldermen sent Mayor Francis Slay a measure that would require lenders to offer homeowners foreclosure mediation. The homeowners do not have to accept, and there's no requirement to reach an agreement.

AP

A tax to generate funds to improve the Gateway Arch, as well regional parks and trails took a step forward in the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Friday.

The so-called “Arch Tax” creates a 3/16th cent sales tax.  If approved by voters in St. Louis City and County the tax would raise $120 million for the Arch grounds.

It would also raise about $600 million for city and county parks as well as the Great Rivers Greenway park and trail district.

The bill passed overwhelmingly with 24 in favor, 3 against and 1 “present” vote.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated to correct Alex Ihnen quote.

Despite concerns about the oversight of funds, a committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved on Thursday a sales tax meant to help pay for upgrades of the Arch grounds.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is a step closer to addressing some legal concerns with its new pension system for firefighters.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle today, 18-10. A final vote will take place next week, likely with a similar result.

Judge Robert Dierker issued a preliminary ruling in October that the city was in rights to terminate the old pension system for firefighters and start a new one. But Dierker had some concerns about the way the new system treated vested employees.

(via Flickr/s_falkow)

Nearly seven years later, the battle over the recall of former St. Louis alderman Tom Bauer is a step closer to final.

The Missouri Court of Appeals today threw out a $150,000 defamation verdict for fliers published against Bauer during his recall election in 2005.

Bauer was thrown out of office in September of that year, in part because of his support for a QuikTrip that would have required the use of eminent domain. The 24th Ward is south of Forest Park and includes Dogtown.

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