St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners

St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners Democratic Director Eric Fey presents before a committee of the whole meeting of the County Council on how April 5's ballot shortages happened.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

Voters may get a do-over in a couple municipal races after the April 5 election saw major ballot shortages at more than 60 polling places throughout St. Louis County.

The St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners voted Tuesday to instruct its lawyers to ask a court whether those ballot issues justify new elections for the mayor of Berkeley and the 2nd Ward alderman in Sunset Hills.

St. Louis County Board of Elections director Gary Fuhr, right, announced his upcoming retirement at this week's Board of Election Commissioners' meeting.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County’s Republican election chief will likely retire later this year.

During this week’s meeting of the county’s Board of Election Commissioners, GOP Elections director Gary Fuhr announced that he was planning to retire. It came as commissioners mulled over whether to punish anybody for ballot shortages at more than 60 polling places earlier this month. (A Democratic director and a Republican director run the elections board. Whichever director shares the governor's party typically is in charge.)

St. Louis County Board of Elections director Eric Fey was suspended without pay on Tuesday.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners suspended its top official, a move that comes after dozens of polling places ran out of ballots during this month’s municipal elections.

After the four-person election board went into closed session on Tuesday, it voted to suspend Democratic director Eric Fey for two weeks without pay. Commissioners also suspended elections coordinator Laura Goebel without pay for one week. The board did not exert any punishment against Republican director Gary Fuhr.

paper ballot voting places
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Updated on Wednesday with comments from state lawmakers: In Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander’s view, what happened last week in St. Louis County was an “inexcusable” event that prevented eligible voters from casting their ballots.

The Democratic official launched an investigation into why roughly 60 polling places ran out of ballots during last week’s municipal elections. His findings largely matched up with what St. Louis Board of Elections director Eric Fey said: There were errors in a database detailing the number of ballot types needed at certain polling places.

paper ballot voting places
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Updated as story develops: St. Louis County’s municipal elections got off to a rocky start on Tuesday, with many polling places quickly running out of ballots. An appeals court extended voting until 9 p.m., but the decision came late. Shortly after 5 p.m., Circuit Judge Maura B. McShane denied a request to extend voting. In a hand-written order, the presiding judge in the county said "the court denies petitioners' request and doesn't believe it has authority to extend the hours."

In an email, Eric Fey, Democratic director of the St. Louis County Board of Elections, said, "Any ballots cast after 7:00 pm as a result of the court order will not be counted tonight."

Eric Fey, St. Louis County Board of Elections director, demonstrates how to select an audio ballot versus the large-print option on the iVotronic system.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio.

Election officials in St. Louis and St. Louis County are reassuring the public that accommodations are in place so people with disabilities can easily vote in Tuesday's presidential primary.

voting booth for paper ballot
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

St. Louis Public Radio's Curious Louis was recently asked about the Village of Country Life Acres. The 2010 census lists the tiny west St. Louis County village as having 74 residents. Yet, it had 92 registered voters at the end of that year.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles listens to public testimony on Saturday about a proposed consent decree. Knowles and the rest of the city council could vote on whether to accept the 131-page agreement on Tuesday.
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

It’s not hyperbole to say that Tuesday’s vote on a proposed consent decree with the federal government is the biggest decision in Ferguson’s history.

The 131-page document casts a huge structural and financial shadow of a municipality still reeling from the shooting death of Michael Brown. If the Ferguson City Council votes to accept the agreement, it could deliver monumental changes to the city’s police department and government – at a hefty price tag.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

Tuesday is Election Day for parts of St. Louis County. And while off-year elections typically don’t bring out a huge number of voters, property hike proposals in the Kirkwood and Mehlville School Districts could bring out more people than usual.

(Kirkwood School District voters will decide whether to raise property taxes by 78 cents for every $100 of assessed value. Mehlville School District residents will consider a 49 cents per $100 of assessed value property tax hike.)

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

It’s been more than two weeks since St. Louis County’s municipal elections. But the counting in some jurisdictions continues – and may not end until this summer. Two elections even ended in a tie.

The county Board of Election Commissioners is also involved in a fight in Kinloch, where some city officials are refusing to swear in the April 7 victors, including a new mayor. The victors have been planning to oust their critics.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

A month before the April election, the St. Louis County Election Board is acknowledging that the ballot for the city of Jennings is faulty – and a special election will need to be held later to correct it.

New county Democratic elections director Eric Fey says the problem is not of the board’s making.

Steve Stenger, left, and Rick Stream
Parth Shah | St. Louis Public Radio intern

(Updated 10 p.m. Tues., Dec. 30)

The St. Louis County Election Board assigned 50 employees this week to conduct a court-ordered recount of the votes cast Nov. 4 in the tight battle for county executive. The election was narrowly won by Democrat Steve Stenger, who defeated Republican Rick Stream.

And when the recount was complete, Stenger still won.

The board fulfilled the aim of the candidates and the court to have the recount completed, and the results public, before Stenger is sworn in at noon Thursday,  New Year’s Day, as county executive.

Vote here sign
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Despite declarations of heightened voter interest, St. Louis County’s absentee tallies so far hint at a far lower turnout than in 2010, the last non-presidential statewide election.

County Democratic Elections Director Rita Days reports that 9,698 people had cast absentee ballots at the close of business Saturday. That pace signals that the county won’t reach its 2010 absentee tally of 25,225.

"I don’t think we’re going to make that number,’’ Days said Tuesday. “It looks like a stretch.”

Official State Photo / State of Missouri House of Representatives

Updated at 8:35 a.m. Tuesday to correct the spelling of Stacey Newman's name.

Updated with comments from Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman

Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman has won the special Democratic primary for the 87th District in St. Louis County, according to results posted on the Missouri Secretary of State website.   

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 1:15 pm to reflect that the maps were drawn by a panel of judges, not the General Assembly.

In the first election after redistricting, it’s not uncommon for former colleagues from the same party to square off for a seat in the Missouri General Assembly.

So the August primary between Democrats Susan Carlson and Stacey Newman for the new 87th District in St. Louis County was nothing unusual - until the unofficial results showed a one-vote margin of victory for Newman. The plot thickened when ballot irregularities made it impossible to conduct a recount.

By now, the two women planned to be helping out other candidates with general election opponents. But instead, they’re back out on the campaign trail for themselves.