St. Louis Development Corporation | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Development Corporation

Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McKee amassed more than 250 acres in north St. Louis as part of his $8 billion redevelopment plan.

In June the City of St. Louis announced that McKee's Northside Regeneration had defaulted on its agreement with the city after nearly a decade. McKee vehemently denies that.

St. Louis Public Radio examined two specific accountability measures included in those agreements that were ostensibly meant to track maintenance and complaints for McKee’s properties. What the reporting found was that only portions of the requirements were met, and the city did little to ensure that the developer followed through completely.

SLDC launches town hall meetings on August 14, 2018
Melody Walker | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Development Corporation has kicked off a campaign of town hall meetings aimed at improving its public image.

SLDC executive director Otis Williams on Tuesday told an audience at the LaunchCode headquarters on Delmar Boulevard, in the Fountain Park neighborhood, “We want to become more transparent.”

Developer Paul McKee owns much of the land in this picture, looking north from the intersection of Cass and Jefferson avenues. After nearly 10 years, the city of St. Louis wants to cut ties with McKee and his NorthSide Regeneration initiative.
File Photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 10 p.m. Tuesday with comments from NorthSide Regeneration — After nearly 10 years, the city of St. Louis wants to cut ties with developer Paul McKee and his NorthSide Regeneration initiative.

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A bill moving through the Missouri General Assembly calls for mapping the state's more than 2,200 special tax districts. 

The number of such districts has exploded over the last 10 years, according to the bill's sponsor, state Rep. Phil Christofanelli, R-St. Peters. He said in some areas the layering of districts has pushed sales tax rates up in "a considerable way."

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

Tax incentives in St. Louis have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years, both from within city government and among citizens' groups.

Now the St. Louis Development Corporation, the agency that recommends whether a development should receive the city’s help, is proposing some reforms.

(courtesy Project Connect)

The city of St. Louis officially owns all the land of the proposed new $1.75 billion National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency facility.

The Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority closed on the last of the 551 parcels this month.

Soon the LCRA, the NGA and the Army Corps of Engineers will sign an options agreement for the land. Once they do, the city will have exactly one year to prepare the site.

(From the Economic Development Incentives report from the PFM Group.)

Each month the commissioners of the Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority of St. Louis hear request after request from developers and even residents for tax abatements that usually last five to 10 years. 

It's just one of the tools the city uses to spur economic development, but St. Louis officials are taking a look at how those tax incentives are distributed. 

The city of St. Louis may use its power of eminent domain against developer Paul McKee and 18 other land owners in its bid to retain the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.

A resolution will be introduced to the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Friday to allow the legal process to begin.

courtesy National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

The city of St. Louis is a step closer to getting a $20 million loan to help it buy land at the proposed National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency site on the north side.

The Board of Aldermen’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning committee voted for the measure 5- 4 on Friday. Yet some committee members expressed concern about paying the area’s largest land owner, developer Paul McKee, for the property.

courtesy National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

The city of St. Louis is estimating it will cost $130 million to bring the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to the north side.

The figure was released Wednesday during a meeting of the Board of Aldermen’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning committee. That money would come primarily from city and state sources, although those were not made public.

(image from GEO St. Louis)

The city of St. Louis is considering taking out a loan of up to $20 million to help buy land for the proposed north city site for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.

bill, sponsored by 5th Ward Alderwoman Tammika Hubbard, outlines how the city would use three buildings as collateral for the loan. The bill was introduced to the Board of Aldermen on Friday.

Paul McKee, NGA
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis wants the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to relocate to the north side of the city. In order to make it a viable option, the city is hustling to buy all 100 acres in the proposed footprint just north of the former Pruitt-Igoe housing project site.

Yet more than half of the property is owned by developer Paul McKee’s Northside Regeneration, which received significant state tax subsidization to acquire the land.

National Geo-Spatial Intelligence Agency, NGA
Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis officials are working hard to convince the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to stay in the city. But property owners in the blocks being offered as a site for the NGA have mixed feelings.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Economic Development Partnership unveiled its first strategic plan for St. Louis and St. Louis County. 

The 33-page document list the priorities for the agency, which was established last year, when portions of the city and the county economic development agencies merged. 

Among the goals outlined in the strategic plan are:

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis often uses tax incentives as a means of spurring development. But one alderman wants to change how the tax breaks are given out and assessed.  

Alderman Joe Roddy, D-17th Ward, told members of the Board of Aldermen’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning Committee on Wednesday that he was forming a group to examine how tax increment financing and tax abatement is done in the city of St. Louis.

Missouri Authorities Awarded $1.6 M To Redevelop Brownfields

Jul 17, 2013
(via Environmental Protection Agency)

Three Missouri agencies will receive $1.6 million in federal funds to cleanup and redevelop contaminated properties.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced this week that it has selected public authorities in St. Louis, Springfield and Jefferson City, to receive the funding as part of its $15 million supplemental revolving loan funds (RLF).

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

A new economic development agreement between St. Louis City and County is a step closer to reality.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen moved a bill forward Thursday that would create a long-talked about partnership.

The bill’s sponsor, Alderman Fred Wessels of the 13th Ward, says it will create entity to serve businesses that want to move into the region.

St. Louis City, County, Team Up On Economic Development

Feb 22, 2013
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

After decades and decades of competing against each other for jobs, St. Louis City and County announced on Friday, a decision to partner up to attract new companies.

The proposal, called the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, would merge two agencies—The St. Louis Development Corporation in the city, and the St. Louis County Economic Development Council, under one roof.

Mayor Francis Slay says the move will create a sense of regionalism that has been lacking in economic development.

St. Louis to get $400,000 from EPA to clean up polluted sites

May 24, 2012
(Amy Lampe/SLDC)

The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $400,000 in grants to the St. Louis Development Corporation. The funds will be used to assess and plan for cleaning up hazardous substances.

EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks says the Agency has a long history of working with the SLDC to clean up contaminated properties, also known as brownfields.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 28, 2011 - St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is calling for a merger of the economic agencies in St. Louis and St. Louis County, saying it would be "a good and timely next step" toward his broader goal of eventually making the city a part of the county.

The mayor also plans to lobby the Regional Commerce and Growth Association to divest itself of its economic development function, so that the group also could be part of his vision for "a single development agency that works for St. Louis."