St. Louis Holocaust Museum and Learning Center

Cantor Howard Shalowitz and Rabbi Yosef Landa lead a burial service for an unknown Holocaust victim on Sunday, April 3, 2016 at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery in St. Louis County.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A victim of the Holocaust has found a final resting place at a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis more than 70 years after World War II.

On Sunday members of the St. Louis Jewish community held a burial service for human remains found at Dachau concentration camp in 1945.

St. Louis County Library

Just because Ben Fainer was silent for 60 years doesn’t mean he has nothing to say.

Ripped from his home in Poland at age 9 by the Nazis, Fainer was separated from his family and sent from camp to camp to camp for six years until he was liberated by the American army in 1945, six years later. He made his way first to Ireland, where he stayed with relatives, then to Canada, and finally to St. Louis, where he spent decades in the garment industry.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: We all have a story to tell, but being heard? That can be the most difficult part.

Gerda Nothmann Luner will have her chance to be heard in a dramatic reading  “Letters to Gerda: The Story of a Family Shattered by the Holocaust”on Aug. 18 at Congregation Shaare Emeth,

(via Flickr/slgckgc)

The St. Louis Holocaust Museum and Learning Center debuts a new interactive exhibit called “Change Begins With Me: Confronting Hate, Discrimination and Ethnic Conflict” this week on the premise that “the lessons of the Holocaust are not yet learned.”