St. Louis Rams

A Rams fan speaks to NFL executives during a public meeting on Tuesday at the Peabody Oprea House.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

If the passion inside the Peabody Opera House could determine the future of the St. Louis Rams, then the team would probably stay in the Gateway City for eternity.

Of course, it’s not that simple.

A rendering of National Car Rental Field, the name new for the proposed football stadium on St. Louis' riverfront.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the eve of a public hearing about the St. Louis Rams’ future in the Gateway City, members of the Board of Aldermen are mulling over whether they’ll pick up part of the tab for the cost of a new stadium. The NFL is hosting a meeting Tuesday night at the Peabody Opera House for the public to sound off on the Rams’ potential relocation to the Los Angeles area.

These renderings show what it would look like in National Car Rental Field. The car rental company forged a $158 million deal to name an in-flux riverfront stadium.
Courtesy of HOK

Dave Peacock concedes that he undersold a bit to Enterprise Holdings when he talked with some of their top brass about sponsoring a roughly $1 billion stadium.

The co-chairman of a task force angling to keep professional football in St. Louis said on Wednesday he went in with a “lower sponsorship level” to Enterprise, a St. Louis-based corporation that owns a number of car rental companies. What Peacock got in return was a 20-year, $158 million offer to name the stadium “National Car Rental Field.”

Alderman Lyda Krewson
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Rachel Lippmann welcome St. Louis Alderman Lyda Krewson to the show.

The Moberly native has represented the city’s 28th Ward since 1997. Her ward includes some of the city’s most popular attractions, such as Forest Park, the St. Louis Zoo, part of ‘The Loop’ and the Central West End business districts.

A rendering of the proposed riverfront stadium
Courtesy of HOK

Members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen may soon get a chance to do something that’s eluded lawmakers in Jefferson City: Vote on funding a proposed football stadium on the city’s riverfront.

While Gov. Jay Nixon's administration may very well issue state bonds for the project without legislative or statewide approval, city aldermen are expected to take up legislation soon that would authorize the city’s funding share of the roughly $1 billion project.

Gov. Jay Nixon says legislators blew their chance to have a say on bonding for a stadium in St. Louis.
File photo by Bill Greenblatt I UPI

Gov. Jay Nixon is facing explicit warnings from key legislators that they won’t approve payments on bonds for a new football stadium on St. Louis’ riverfront if they aren’t first approved by a legislative or public vote.

But the Democratic governor is dismissing the threats as too little, too late – pointing to inaction during the past legislative session.

HOK|360 ARCHITECTURE

One of the Missouri House's budget writers is warning Gov. Jay Nixon to change his stance on pursuing funding for a new NFL stadium without a vote of the people.

Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick, R-Shell Knob, is vice chair of the House select committee on the state budget. In a letter to Nixon, a Democrat, he said he won't support any budget bill next year that includes funding for debt service on bonds issued for a new NFL stadium in St. Louis.

Stadium task force co-chair Dave Peacock presents revised stadium plan to the Missouri Development Finance Board. The stadium project is asking for $15 million in tax breaks this year and plans to ask for $17.5 million each in 2016 and 2017.
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated with vote - The Missouri Development Finance Board Tuesday approved tax breaks to help fund a proposed new NFL stadium in St. Louis. This vote was for $15 million out of what's expected to be a total of $50 million in credits.

It's part of a revised stadium proposal that would cost $998 million, including $820 million for sight clearance and construction.

new stadium, St. Louis Rams
Courtesy HOK | 360 Architecture

Mayor Francis Slay is standing by his decision not to appeal a judge's ruling throwing out a required citywide vote on public financing for sports stadiums, despite a pledge to "vigorously defend the law."

Stadium Approach from the Southeast
HOK | 360 Architecture

Updated with comments from Dave Peacock, John Ammann, and Mayor Slay - A St. Louis judge has ruled that city voters do not have a right to weigh in on public spending for a proposed new football stadium north of Laclede's Landing.

"Judgment shall be, and hereby is, entered in favor of Plaintiff Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority and against Defendant City of St. Louis on Plaintiff’s Petition for Declaratory Judgment. City Ordinance 66509, Chapter 3.91 of the Revised Code of the City of St. Louis, is hereby declared INVALID."

HOK|360 ARCHITECTURE

A circuit judge in Jefferson City is weighing a legal challenge that could affect funding for a new NFL stadium in St. Louis. The lawsuit centers on Gov. Jay Nixon's position that he has the authority to extend the pay-off period for the bonds used to build the Edward Jones Dome, the current home of the St. Louis Rams.

Stadium Approach from the Southeast
HOK | 360 Architecture

It's now up to a St. Louis judge to decide whether city voters get to approve any public assistance for sports stadiums.

Aerial View Looking Southwest Toward Downtown.
HOK | 360 Architecture

On Thursday afternoon, three sets of attorneys will gather in the small chambers of St. Louis Circuit Judge Thomas Frawley to debate what is required of the city of St. Louis before public funding goes toward a new football stadium.

It’s one of several legal challenges to the bare-bones financing plan outlined by Gov. Jay Nixon’s two-man task force looking to keep the Rams in St. Louis.

A rendering of the proposed riverfront stadium
Courtesy of HOK

After being stuffed in the General Assembly, skeptics of a proposed riverfront stadium in St. Louis are taking their fight to court.

Six lawmakers filed a suit Wednesday in Cole County Circuit Court to, among other things, prevent Gov. Jay Nixon from “extending” state bonds paying off the Edward Jones Dome to fund the new stadium. Office of Administration Director Doug Nelson contended earlier this year that Nixon had such authority, which spurred unsuccessful bills to force either a legislative or statewide vote on the matter.

Proposed Carson, California stadium
L.A. Times| Manica Architecture

The Rams' future in St. Louis continues to be uncertain.

National Football League owners are meeting this week in San Francisco and are expected to receive updates on stadium plans in St. Louis and two Los Angeles suburbs: Carson and Inglewood.

MLS Commissioner Don Garber meets with reporters in St. Louis. Garber toured a potential stadium site near the city's north riverfront.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The commissioner of Major League Soccer was in St. Louis on Tuesday to visit the site of a potential stadium on the city’s riverfront.

But while expressing optimism that St. Louis could support a professional soccer team, the chief of the country’s most popular league emphasized it’s way too early to talk about when an expansion would happen.

Sens. Rob Schaaf

On this episode of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies break a bit of ground by welcoming two guests for one show – state Sen. Rob Schaaf and former Sen. Jim Lembke. 

Schaaf is a Republican from St. Joseph, Mo. He's a physician who has played a key role in health care policy over the past few years.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay talked of 24-hour shifts to build a riverfront stadium at a conference last year.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

You don’t have to try that hard to get St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay to express effusive support for a new football stadium on his city’s riverfront.

With the St. Louis Rams potentially bolting to the Los Angeles area, Slay joined with Gov. Jay Nixon and numerous labor unions in backing the roughly $1 billion stadium. For the Democratic mayor, the project would not only provide steady work for thousands of people – it would revitalize a rather drab part of St. Louis’ riverfront.

Gov. Jay Nixon speaks on Thursday at St. Louis Building Trades headquarters in south St. Louis. Labor unions agreed to work 24-hour shifts with no overtime to build a riverfront stadium in St. Louis.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The caretakers for the Edward Jones Dome have initiated a lawsuit to see whether St. Louis residents will have to vote to approve public financing of a proposed riverfront stadium.

It’s a legal maneuver that seeks to clarify a sticking point in obtaining the money for a project that could keep professional football in St. Louis.

Stadium Approach from the Southeast
HOK | 360 Architecture

The supervisor of St. Louis University's civil litigation clinic is threatening legal action to force a public vote in St. Louis over a proposed nearly $1 billion riverfront football stadium.

It’s a move that reflects the growing demand for some sort of vote to approve the proposed stadium’s public financing.

State Sen. Ryan Silvey shows off his panaromic picture of Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City. Silvey is part of a growing chorus of policymakers that want some sort of vote on extending bonds for a new stadium.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

It would be fair to classify Paul Meinhold as a long-suffering St. Louis Rams fan.

The St. Charles native purchased personal seat licenses for the team when players like Kurt Warner, Marshall Faulk and Az-Zahir Hakim constituted the Greatest Show on Turf. But Meinhold bailed out on his season tickets once the team descended into mediocrity.

A rendering of the St. Louis riverfront stadium.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger says county taxpayers will no longer be asked to foot some of the bill for a new football stadium.

It’s a potentially complicating factor in conjuring up public financing to build the open-air facility on St. Louis' riverfront.

The St. Louis Stamping Co. sits in the shadow of the proposed NFL stadium in St. Louis. The six-building complex, at Cass Avenue and First Street, Florida and Collins streets, was built in 1871 and 1913.
Google Streetview

Much has been made of what St. Louis could gain with a new NFL stadium, but what about the things it could lose?

The proposed plans for the stadium include demolishing two dozen buildings, including the St. Louis Stamping Co. buildings and the Cotton Belt Freight Depot. Both are part of the National Register of Historic Places, but that doesn’t provide protection — it denotes the building has historic significance.

HOK/360 Architecture

State officials are claiming that building a new NFL-caliber stadium in St. Louis would provide a huge financial benefit to Missouri.

The proposed new riverfront stadium, which would seat around 64,000 people, has an estimated price tag of $860 million to $985 million.

Mary Ellen Ponder
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

On this edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann welcome Mary Ellen Ponder to the show. 

Ponder was recently appointed chief of staff for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, replacing Jeff Rainford. She is the first woman to serve as chief of staff for a St. Louis mayor.

St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

On a special edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann preview Tuesday’s election in St. Louis.

Former Anheuser Busch President Dave Peacock, left, said in a statement on Wednesday he's not concerned by Inglewood's vote to approve a new stadium. That venture could be a death knell to the Rams' future in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

In a 5-0 vote, the Inglewood City Council paved the way Tuesday for a new stadium that could lure the St. Louis Rams back to the Los Angeles area.

But the leader of a task force that’s angling to build a riverfront stadium for the Rams in St. Louis said he isn’t concerned about the news.

Gov. Jay Nixon's zest for a new stadium on St. Louis' riverfront isn't necessarily extending to members fo the GOP-controlled legislature. That could make a difference if a bill requiring a legislative vote before extending bonds becomes law.
File photo by Bill Greenblatt I UPI

If somebody listened to Gov. Jay Nixon talk about a new stadium on St. Louis riverfront, they’d get the sense that it's an opportunity too good to pass up. Not everyone agrees.

Gov. Jay Nixon speaks on Thursday at St. Louis Building Trades headquarters in south St. Louis. Labor unions agreed to work 24-hour shifts with no overtime to build a riverfront stadium in St. Louis.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

St. Louis labor unions are willing to work 24-hours-a-day without overtime to build a stadium on the city’s riverfront.

It’s a move that Gov. Jay Nixon said showcases how serious the city and state are about building a stadium aimed at keeping professional football in the Gateway City.

Ray Howze / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Highway Patrol Superintendent Ron Replogle will retire on May 1, Gov. Jay Nixon announced  Wednesday.

The news came hours before the state legislature began its probe into the governor's handling of the unrest in Ferguson. The grand jury's decision not to indict former Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown touched off a violent night of rioting in Ferguson on Nov. 24.

But Nixon said the timing of the announcement and the hearing were not related.

Pages