St. Louis Symphony | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Symphony

John Cage
Wikipedia

Last week, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra took over the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts.

That symphony musicians play at the Pulitzer is not news. Ensembles have been bringing new works to the Grand Center neighbor for some time. But this time it was the entire orchestra and the work was a major piece by an American composer that had not be presented in this country before.

Via St. Louis Symphony | Dan Dreyfus

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 25.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

DEAN   Testament
DEAN   Viola Concerto
BEETHOVEN   Symphony No. 3, "Eroica"

Dan Dreyfus

The St. Louis Symphony announced plans for its 2014-15 season at a town hall meeting on Thursday, January 23.  It is a season highlighted by many significant anniversaries: David Robertson’s 10th as music director, David Halen’s 20th season as concertmaster, Amy Kaiser’s 20th season as chorus director, the 20th anniversary of the In UNISON Chorus, the 45th season of the St. Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra  and the 135th anniversary of the St. Louis Symphony, and all these take place while the city celebrates the 250th anniversary of its founding.

Via St. Louis Symphony | Dan Dreyfus

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 18.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

Vanity Projects

Using words like “play” and “permissiveness” in its promotional materials, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts wants to make sure St. Louisans know it's operating on a different frequency in the upcoming “Reset” program.

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 11.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

photo of David Robertson, Stephanie Berg and Jeanne Sinquefield
Courtesy of the St. Louis Symphony

Composer and musician Stephanie Berg will achieve a rare distinction when the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra performs her composition, “Ravish and Mayhem” at Powell Hall performances on Jan. 10 and 11. Berg, who is in her 20s, appears to be the youngest composer from St. Louis to have a work played by the SLSO during its subscription series.

August Kryger

Kansas City native Stephanie Berg just received a master's in clarinet performance and composition from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2012. And she only began thinking of making a career as a composer in 2009, after wining the Sinquefield Composition Prize. But she already is making her St. Louis Symphony debut. On Jan. 10 and 11, the symphony will perform Berg's "Ravish and Mayhem."

Originally written for chamber orchestra, the piece was inspired by a "wild street festival" in "some sort of exotic location, like ancient Egypt," Berg said.

Dilip Vishwanat

St. Louis Symphony Music Director David Robertson sat down with Cityscape host Steve Potter for a year-end reflection on the accomplishments in the first four months of the 2013-14 season as well as a look at what is still in store.

Topping Robertson’s list of Fall highlights is the Carnegie Hall performance of Britten’s opera “Peter Grimes” which received much critical acclaim including being named in the top five classical concerts in 2013 by New York Times classical music critic Anthony Tommasini.

Mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey and tenor Nicholas Phan are two of the soloists that join David Robertson and the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus in Cantatas 1-3 of Bach’s Christmas Oratorio on December 6 and 7. The two singers also performed in the St. Louis Symphony's performance of Bach's Mass in B Minor in April, 2012.

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

BACH    Cantata Nos. 1-3 from Christmas Oratorio

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 30.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

(via Flickr/cliff1066™)

David Robertson conducted the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus as well as a roster of vocal soloists in a concert version of Benjamin Britten’s opera “Peter Grimes” in Carnegie Hall on November 22, the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth.  St. Louis Symphony goers had the opportunity to preview that performance the previous Saturday in Powell Hall.  Both performances received accolades from audience members and critics.

Alex Irvin

David Robertson, the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus and a cast of vocal soloists led by tenor Anthony Dean Griffey and soprano Susanna Phillips traveled to New York City this week to perform a concert version of Benjamin Britten’s “Peter Grimes.”  The November 22nd performance marks the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth. St. Louisans were treated to a preview performance on November 16 in Powell Hall.

Alex Irvin

On Saturday, November 16, David Robertson conducted the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus and a cast of vocal soloists in a concert version of Benjamin Britten’s “Peter Grimes.” These same forces will reprise that performance in Carnegie Hall on Friday, November 22, the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth.

Alex Irvin

American tenor Anthony Dean Griffey has performed to great acclaim in opera houses and concert halls around the world.  But when he appears in the title role of the St. Louis Symphony’s concert version of Britten’s opera “Peter Grimes,” it will be another opportunity to sing the role that is near and dear to his heart.  Not only was it his first major role when he first performed it while a student at Tanglewood, but because Griffey grew up as a shy, misunderstood child, he feels a real connection to the character.

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

BRITTEN   Peter Grimes (complete opera)

Left to Right: Baritone Liam Bonner as Ned Keene, soprano Susanna Phillips as Ellen Orford, and Tenor Anthony Dean Griffey as Peter Grimes.
Julien Jourdes

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - NEW YORK - All is metaphor.

From the embroidery floss used by Ellen Orford to draw the anchor on the sweater of poor, doomed John the Apprentice, to the churning, life-sustaining, murderous tumult of the ocean, each ordinary material, every massive natural phenomenon, all human emotions, all have meaning well beyond the accepted or conscious.

Benjamin Britten in 1968
Wikipedia

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - When music director David Robertson takes the podium Saturday to lead the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus in a performance of Benjamin Britten’s “Peter Grimes,” light will shine brighter on an already luminous musical tradition in St. Louis. That tradition is the unusual concentration of performances here of music composed by the celebrated musical polymath, a history distinguished by quality and creativity, most certainly -- but also by the sheer frequency of productions.

Via St. Louis Symphony | Dan Dreyfus

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 9.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

The majority of this interview is a rebroadcast from April 19, 2013.

Cellist Bjorn Ranheim and violinist Shawn Weil are colleagues in the St. Louis Symphony.  Double bassist Syd Rodway and composer/keyboardist Adam Maness are members of the Erin Bode Group.  They got to know each other when Ranheim and Weil collaborated with the Erin Bode Group and also shared an interest in good food and fine beer. 

(via YouTube video clip)

What do you get when you get creative professional musicians from two baseball-crazy cities and add a World Series matchup? Well, something like this:

Andrew Thompson
St. Louis Symphony

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During rehearsal Wednesday morning, many in the St. Louis Symphony orchestra played the first measures of Tchaikovsky through tears. The tears had begun earlier during a long moment of silence for a young orchestra member, Andrew Thompson, who died suddenly the day before.

“We just lost a member of our family,” said Symphony violist Susan Gordon.

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

Allegra Lilly
Provided by Ms. Lilly

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: They come from different cities. Some with spouses or significant others. Some with pets and some alone. Each has chosen a different part of St. Louis to call home, but all share a passion for music, a desire to be close to Powell Hall.

They are the five new members of the St. Louis Symphony: Allegra Lilly, principal harp; Shannon Wood, principal timpani; Ann Fink, first violin; Ann Choomack, piccolo and Karin Bliznik, principal trumpet. And since their arrival in St. Louis, they all have been quite busy preparing for the first concerts of the season and becoming acclimated to their new home.

Alise O'Brien

We continue our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Jazz and the St. Louis Symphony haven’t been strangers. So when Maureen Byrne, Community Programs manager at the St. Louis Symphony, received a phone call from Phil Dunlap, Jazz St. Louis’ director of education, about collaborating with The Bad Plus to perform works by Igor Stravinsky, it wasn’t unusual. Classical music and jazz can and do co-exist quite nicely here.

It took three seasons for the St. Louis Symphony to fill the position of Principal Trumpet after Susan Slaughter stepped down in 2010 after 40 years.  Slaughter holds the distinction of being the first female to hold the principal position in a major symphony orchestra and the word “legend” has been used to describe her. 

(via Flickr/pasa47)

Welcome back! We begin our live broadcasts of the St. Louis Symphony for the 2013-2014 season this weekend, and you can be right there with us from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's planned for you this weekend:

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