St. Louis Zoo

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Cardinals lose Game 5 to Texas Rangers

The Ranger's Mike Napoli hit a tiebreaking two-run double in the eighth inning against Marc Rzepczynski , and the team rallied from a two-run deficit to beat the Cardinals 4-2  last night and take a 3-2 World Series lead.

Solo home runs by Mitch Moreland in the third and Adrian Beltre in the sixth off Chris Carpenter sparked the Texas comeback. Michael Young doubled off loser Octavio Dotel leading off the eighth. Darren Oliver got the win in relief of C.J. Wilson.

(Michael Abbene/Saint Louis Zoo)

Cute alert!

St. Louis has a new resident - at the St. Louis Zoo's Emerson Children's Zoo.

"Nina," a miniature burro, was born Tuesday, Oct. 4 in front of staff and visitors. Her mother, "Miss Barney," came to the St. Louis Zoo this summer.

The little foal weighs 31 pounds and stands 23 inches tall. The Zoo says ancestors of the mini burro, or miniature donkey, come from the island of Sicily near the Mediterranean Sea.

(Photo courtesy of Becky Heisler/Saint Louis Zoo)

The Asian elephant calf Kenzi is making her public debut this morning at the Saint Louis Zoo.

The three-month-old calf will be on view at the "River's Edge" habitat from 10 a.m. to noon and then again from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. today through Sunday.

(Courtesy St. Louis Zoo)

Updated 2:10 p.m. Aug. 23 with cause of death

One of the country's top professional associations for zoos and aquariums says people should not be worried about the quality of care at the St. Louis Zoo, despite the death of another animal there.

(Rachael Macy/Saint Louis Zoo)

A new source of pride and joy has arrived to join her own pride at the St. Louis Zoo. An African lion cub was born on July 17 at the Zoo, along with another female cub which was, unfortunately, stillborn.

The female cub, named Imani, which means "faith" in Swahili, became dehydrated several days after birth, and is now being hand-fed, with success, at the Zoo's veterinary hospital.

(Dan Kirk)

Updated 11:52 a.m.

The endangered American burying beetle could be making its way to a southwestern Missouri prairie.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to work with the St. Louis Zoo to reintroduce the colorful beetle to Wah-Kon-Tah Prairie in St. Clair and Cedar counties.

The Zoo has a population of the beetles. Zoo officials say they have not been seen in Missouri in more than two decades.

(You might remember this earlier feature from our own Véronique LaCapra on the about some dedicated supporters in St. Louis joining a nationwide effort to save the insect).

(photo by Carol Weerts/St. Louis Zoo)

Updated to reflect the fact that chimp was euthanized last month.

A chimpanzee who helped foster six young apes at the St. Louis Zoo while raising his own youngster has died.

The Zoo announced today that Smoke was euthanized June 22 after veterinary staff found that an infection and inflammation in his abdomen had spread.

(St. Louis Zoo)

Updated 2:47 p.m. July 5 with name finalized:

The St. Louis Zoo announced that a name has been chosen for the baby elephant, Kenzi, which won with 69,406 (53.88%) votes. Runner up June received 40,683 votes (31.58%), Zoe received 12,249 votes (9.51%) and Mya received 6,438 votes (5%). Write-ins received .03% of the vote.

Updated 10:27 a.m. June 28 with naming contest information

It's a girl: The latest addition to the St. Louis Zoo is a bouncing baby elephant.

(photo courtesy of the St. Louis Zoo)

Spring marks a lot of firsts in the city of St. Louis - the first pitch, the first Ted Drewes concrete, the first of the daffodils along area highways.

There's a special "first" this year for visitors to the St. Louis Zoo - a chance to see two new Grevy's zebra foals as they venture outside for the first time after their births.

Asante was born in November, and his half-sister Zuri arrived in January. Now that the weather has warmed up, Zuri and Asante are outside with the rest of the herd.

(St. Louis Zoo)

A 40-year old Asian elephant at the St. Louis Zoo named "Donna" has tested positive for tuberculosis, but is expected to be just fine.

Donna the Elephant came to the St. Louis zoo as a 3-year old juvenile in 1971.

All elephants get complete medical evaluation each year including blood collection, vaccinations and trunk cultures to look for tuberculosis.

Randy Junge, the Zoo's Director of Animal Health said the 40-year-old pachyderm will live off-display for the next year, but won't be quarantined.

sifaka lemurs
Courtesy Saint Louis Zoo

Recently, a kangaroo joey, then a rhino calf were born at the St. Louis Zoo. Now, adding to its collection of new little residents, the latest arrival is a Coquerel’s sifaka, an endangered lemur species from Madagascar.

The baby was born at the Saint Louis Zoo’s Primate House on Jan. 9, 2011.

If you're a little tired of this cold weather, you're in luck, as the iconic "Punxsutawney Phil" groundhog did not see his shadow this morning -- signaling Spring's early return. 

For those of you who looked for Groundhog Day-related fun a little closer to home today to no avail, that's because our new local "representative" is a little too groggy for the task this year.

There's a new arrival to the world, and St. Louis.

A black rhinoceros calf was born at the St. Louis Zoo on Jan. 14. The "little" male weighs in at 120.5 pounds.

According to a press release,  the Saint Louis Zoo’s black rhinos are part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Black Rhino Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program to manage a genetically healthy population of black rhinos in North American zoos. Currently there are 60 black rhinos in 38 institutions.

The release also shares that this is the first black rhino calf to be born at the Zoo in 20 years.

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