St. Louis

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Updated 9:15 a.m. August 9:

St. Louis County confirmed its fourth heat-related death of the summer today.

A son discovered the victim, a 76-year-old Lemay man, on July 10. The cause of death was certified on Wednesday.

The victim lived in the 700 block of Military Rd. The brick house had no central air conditioning, and a window unit was not working. The temperature inside the home was estimated to be between 90 and 95 degrees.

Extreme heat not expected to let up any time soon

Jun 29, 2012
Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio

Oppressive heat and triple-digit temperatures continue to blanket the Midwest from Ohio, down through drought-plagued Indiana, Illinois and Missouri.

With high temperature records being surpassed left and right the National Weather Service is forecasting St. Louis will reach 108 degrees for the second day in a row.

The hot temperatures and dry conditions are particularly hard on those whose jobs involve being outside.

Aaron Angst installs siding and rain gutters, hard work he says, especially when completely exposed to the sun.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri lawmakers have approved legislation that would allow residents in the St. Louis area to vote on whether to raise a local sales tax to help fund improvements at the Gateway Arch.

The measure would allow a local election on a 3/16 percent sales tax. Part of the money would go to the Gateway Arch, and a portion would go to local parks. It also would allow voters in the Kansas City area to decide on a 1/10th percent sales tax for parks, trails and greenways in Jackson County.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A Missouri House committee has unanimously passed a bill that would make cuts to firefighter pensions in St. Louis, but not before committee members made a few changes to the legislation.

New St. Louis firefighters would pay in 9 percent of their salaries, instead of 8 percent as originally proposed, and applicants would have to disclose any pre-existing injuries and conditions before being hired.  New hires would still get back 25 percent of what they pay in as originally proposed.  It’s sponsored by State Rep. Mike Leara (R, Sunset Hills).

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

March’s average temperature in St. Louis this year is almost 15 degrees above normal. If the forecast holds true tomorrow, St. Louis’s unusually high temperatures will make this the warmest March on record.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Britt says the average temperature this month will be almost 61 degrees.

“The previous record of 1910 was only about 57.5 so that’s a considerable breaking of the record,” he said.  

(via Flickr/ScottSpaeth)

The city of St. Louis will spend the next two years documenting and researching area buildings that went up during the post-World War II construction boom.

Flickr/Just Arrived

Get the most recent watches and warnings for Illinois here, and for Missouri here.

(via Flickr/functoruser)

Updated at 9:50 a.m. Wednesday with copy of Judge Neill's order.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. Tuesday  with comments from the city.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday with comments from plaintiff's attorney, more information on the ruling.

A St. Louis circuit court judge has ruled that the city's red light camera ordinance is both unconstitutional and violates state law.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

The American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri is challenging language on a ballot initiative that would transfer control of the St. Louis Police Department from the state to the city.

ACLU Regional Program Director John Chasnoff says the initiative's summary, as it would appear on the ballot, fails to explain how the new law would restrict public oversight and access to records.

No laws set the names of the 79 neighborhoods crammed into the 66 square miles of the city of St. Louis. Some grew from urban legends, others from a distinctive landmark. Some date back decades and are instantly known to any St. Louis resident. Others have changed as landmarks fell, highways reshaped boundaries, or people felt the need for a fresh start.

(Map courtesy Competitor Group, Inc.)

More than 21,000 runners and walkers will wind their way through St. Louis city streets this Sunday as part of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon and half-marathon.

The race is unique because it will feature 26 live bands and 18 local cheerleading squads performing along the course. The band Sugar Ray will headline a concert at the finish line. Margie Martin, the event’s manager, says they were surprised by how many people signed up to participate in this, the first Rock-n-Roll Marathon here. 

(via Flickr/lissalou66)

Updated to correct spelling of Isaacson's name.

Four new shows will mark the Muny's first season under new executive director Mike Isaacson.

One of those shows has appeared on the Muny state before, says Kate Lane, Isaacson's assistant. But the Muny did not produce the version of "Chicago" that theatergoers saw in 1977. Instead, the Broadway cast left New York for a week of performances. This will be the first time the Muny itself produces the show.

St. Louis Convention & Visitor’s Commission

The City of St. Louis is hosting what tourism officials are calling the “Super Bowl of Conventions" this weekend.

The members of American Society of Association Executives are responsible for booking some $60 billion in convention activity annually.

All told, some 5,000 hospitality industry reps and executives will be in St. Louis from Saturday to Tuesday.  

The purpose of the convention is for those reps to try to convince 1,500 different associations to hold annual meetings in their city.

(via Flickr/jetsandzepplins)

The nearly three-week heat wave has claimed another victim.

St. Louis City officials announced today that 90-year-old Earline Walker died July 24 at her home on Semple Ave. Window air-conditioning units were blowing hot air when her family found her body that morning.

Semple is the sixth confirmed victim in the city. As of July 29, there were 14 heat-related deaths in the St. Louis region.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

Some would say the sport of baseball looms larger in St. Louis than perhaps any city in America …with names like Musial, Gibson, and Pujols on par with Washington, Jefferson and Madison.

St. Louis is a baseball town, no question…but we’re also known for another sport involving bats, balls…but no bases.

After nearly 100 years, devotees of the St. Louis sport of "corkball" are still playing the game that time forgot.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Flooding along the Mississippi River has forced the relocation of parts of this weekend's Fair St. Louis, but - good news - the water isn't expected to get any higher.

The river is expected to crest at 34 feet in St. Louis tomorrow - just four feet above flood stage.

And Army Corps St. Louis district commander Tom O'Hara says that takes into account the water still flowing into the Missouri River from dams in North and South Dakota and Montana.

(Photo courtesy of MoDOT)

Updated 9:30 p.m. with additional lane closures:

The Missouri Department of Transportation now says they will have to close the two right lanes of eastbound Interstate 70 at Shreve during Monday morning rush  hour to repair a collapsed sewer line. That will leave one lane open between Shreve and West Florissant. MoDOT officials are strongly urging people to avoid the area.

Our earlier story:

(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

EMS billing will be outsourced, and overtime for firefighters and jail guards has been cut under a budget approved Friday by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

The money the city hopes to save by outsourcing helped aldermen restore funds for bulk trash pick-up, crime prevention and building demolition.

But it was $500,000 that wasn't restored to the Affordable Housing Commission that drew the lone no vote from Alderwoman Kacie Starr Triplett.

(via Flickr/makelessnoise)

Houston now has one fewer problem to worry about.

Moon dust apparently smuggled years ago from Johnson Space Center is now back in Houston - from St. Louis.

(National Weather Service map/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Above: A National Weather Service map of projected flooding along the lower Missouri River, based on an average amount of summer rain, falling in a concentrated time period. This map assumes a river elevation of 37 feet at St. Charles, three feet below the 1993 record. Flood stage at St. Charles is 25 feet. Click here to see a larger version of the map.

The U.S Army Corps of Engineers says we can expect only minor flooding along the lower Missouri River if we get average rainfall through August - but, a stormy summer could change all that.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A unanimous vote today by the legislation committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen kicked off the public part of the city's redistricting process.

St. Louis City Hall
Richie Diesterheft | Flickr

The City of St. Louis has received $600,000 to provide homeless veterans with services.

The money will be split between the St. Patrick Center, which offers housing services, and Employment Connection which provides job training skills.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay says that as approximately 12 percent of the city’s homeless are veterans.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Updated at 3:19 p.m. June 8 to add information about murder charge

Previously we told you about a shooting just southwest of downtown St. Louis that left a seven-year-old girl in critical condition.

Sadly, according to the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, the shooting has taken a fatal turn.

(via Flickr/List)

A heat advisory is in effect in the St. Louis Public Radio listening area until 7 p.m. on Wednesday (June 8), but medical emergencies associated with the heat have already begun.

The St. Louis City Department of Health said that, as of Monday afternoon, there have been 12 heat-related EMS runs and eight heat-related hospital reports in St. Louis since Saturday (June 4).

St. Louis County also said that 17 people were treated for heat exhaustion over the weekend.

kevindooley via Flickr

The Missouri treasurer's office has returned $1.4 million in unclaimed property to a St. Louis area employer.

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel said the returned money is the second largest amount his office has returned from unclaimed property. He did not identify the employer.

The $1.4 million account was made up of more than 260 individual securities accounts. The largest single amount, $1.6 million, was returned in January 2010 to a person in the St. Louis area.

(Ettie Berneking/St. Louis Public Radio)

Urban gardening has found a stronghold in backyard and community plots and now, with some help from one organization, urban gardening is making its move into St. Louis schools.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The two state Senators who represent the bulk of St. Louis city are continuing to express concerns about a proposed state legislative district map that splits the city into a northern and southern half.

The city is currently divided along a line that travels roughly along Grand Avenue. That, says Democratic state Senator Robin Wright-Jones, makes both the districts very diverse.

The proposed map, she says, resets 40 years of battling racial divisions.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

A 48-year-old north St. Louis man faces five felony counts for his role in a shooting just southwest of downtown that left a seven-year-old girl in critical condition.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Have you gotten a ticket from one of 51 red light cameras in the city of St. Louis?

If a new court ruling stands, you might not have to pay the $100 fine.

(Courtesy Nick Sargent)

Updated 4:30 p.m. May 23:

Severe weather hit the St. Louis area once again this season. Severe winds, hail and large amounts of rain all contributed to today's storm.

So far, this is what we know:

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