St. Louis

(via Flickr/Patrick H~)

St. Louis has been named as one of 24 cities worldwide to be awarded a "Smarter Cities" grant by IBM, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Tim Logan reports

What does the grant entail? And how will it be used in St. Louis?

(via Flickr/Richie Diesterheft)

Updated at 12:30 p.m. Wed. with correct percentages

Updated with final unofficial results at 10:30 p.m.

A former St. Louis alderman who was recalled from office in 2005 over his support for controversial development projects in his south city ward seems poised to take his old seat back in April.

(via Flickr/janineomg)

Back in December 2010 we told you that St. Louis is joining the National Children's Study, the largest long-term study of child health ever conducted in the United States.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

FBI officials in St. Louis suspect that a man who robbed a Regions Bank branch on Friday is the same man responsible for four other bank robberies in the St. Louis area since December.

The robber entered the bank about 9:15 a.m. Friday, approached a teller, displayed a handgun and demanded money. He left with an undisclosed amount.

The FBI says the same man may have robbed the same bank on Jan. 31, another Regions Bank branch on Feb. 22, the Southern Commercial Bank on Jan. 12 and First Bank on Dec. 6.

Compton Bridge to reopen tomorrow

Feb 28, 2011

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A map of the location of the Compton Bridge. Click around in the map to explore.

The Compton Bridge in midtown St. Louis is set to reopen to traffic tomorrow.

Compton will be the primary detour during the 14-month reconstruction of the Grand Boulevard Bridge.

(US Census Bureau)

In 2009, the news from the U.S. Census Bureau was all good for the city of St. Louis.

The American Community Survey showed the city's population had 356,587 people - up about two percent from the 2000 official count. And Mayor Francis Slay would challenge numbers that didn't confirm the notion that his city was growing.

Officials with the Missouri Department of Transportation say work on the Poplar Street Bridge will start this spring and continue into the fall.

The work will involve resurfacing the bridge deck and will result in lane closures and traffic delays.

Deanna Venker is an area engineer for MoDOT.  She says the work could not be delayed until the completion of the new Mississippi River bridge in 2014.

(via Flickr/ Giles Douglas)

More not-so-great economic news for the St. Louis region today.

The Home Builders Association of St. Louis and Eastern Missouri released its data on the number of permits issued by the six counties (St. Louis, St. Charles, Lincoln, Warren and Franklin) and the city of St. Louis. They show that builders were looking to start construction on just 120 new single-family homes in January 2011. That's down more than 40 percent from January 2010, and is the lowest monthly total since November of 2008.

Some scientists say risks of another major earthquake from the New Madrid fault are minimal.

But FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate insists the threat to the St. Louis region is real.

The city of St. Louis today marked the halfway point in its ten-year effort to end chronic homelessness.

A five-year report released today shows a 20 percent drop in the city's chronically homeless since 2005.

Chronic homelessness is defined as those homeless for a year or more or four times over a three-year period.

The report also states that the overall homeless population also decreased, from about 1,500 in 2005 to about 1,300 last year.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

Counterfeit resident alien cards, social security cards, state driver’s licenses and foreign driver’s licenses were all available from a St. Louis-area false document lab in 2010.

And now three men have pleaded guilty to the lab's operation, according to a U.S. Department of Justice press release.

Mauricio Aparicio-Gonzalez, 24, and Mauro Martinez-Espinosa, 23, pleaded guilty today, while  Reinaldo Pereida, 49, pleaded Jan. 31. All three men are Mexican nationals and their sentencings are set for May 2011.

Updated at 5:30 pm with further remarks from St. Louis Democrats chair Brian Wahby

The Democratic National Committee has announced its choice city for the 2012 Democratic National Convention -- and it's not St. Louis.

Charlotte, N.C. has been named the host of the event over St. Louis and other finalist cities Cleveland and Minneapolis.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

St. Louis police are investigating the death of a former St. Louis city prosecutor who was shot at her home.

Jessa Schauman died Thursday, a day after police were called to a home she shared with a former St. Louis police officer. She had been shot in the head. Police say that the initial call indicated a suicide attempt, but a preliminary investigation led officers to classify the death as suspicious.

There’s been a temporary delay in a new skirmish between the city and its fire department.

Ald. Matt Villa has held a bill that aims to change the way certain benefits for firefighters are funded.

When a natural disaster hits, the devastation left behind isn't always limited to destroyed property and emotional distress.

Another element -- fraud -- is sometimes an unwanted companion to the recovery process.

Yesterday, we told you that a $19 billion deal with China landed Boeing an order for production of 200 airplanes. Well, today's news about the company is more about cuts than gains.

Boeing Co. says it's cutting 1,100 jobs from its U.S. plants, most of them in Southern California, as it scales back production of its C-17 cargo planes.

A former CIA operative accused of disclosing confidential documents to a New York Times reporter has agreed to be returned to Virginia to face prosecution.

Jeffrey Sterling of O'Fallon, Mo., waived extradition Monday during a brief federal court appearance in St. Louis. The timing of his flight back to Virginia is unclear. Sterling recently had a knee replaced and he will be returned to Virginia as soon as it is medically possible.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Don't put your boots or ice scraper away, snow is coming again to St. Louis -- and soon.

The Missouri Department of Transportation has prepared area roadways for the 3 to 6 inches of snow that is forecasted for the St. Louis metropolitan area.

MoDOT crews began treating roads last night with a salt brine mix. Bruce Pettus, maintenance superintendent for MoDOT, says as the snow begins to fall, conditions will begin to deteriorate during rush hour traffic, making it difficult for crews to clear the roads.

"That's why we're asking the motorists to minimize travel, maybe leave a little early from work. And make that commute before we get accumulating snow. And then this evening, do the same thing, minimize travel. We're gonna have all of our forces on the road, but it'll just allow us more space to work."

Pettus says MoDOT will have over 200 trucks on the road once the snow begins to accumulate.

Curran | Flickr

Cigarettes are in the news again, but this time it's not about banning the smoking of them.

Eleven men from the St. Louis and Chicago areas are facing federal indictment for allegedly trafficking in contraband cigarettes.

The U.S. Attorney's office in St. Louis announced the indictments on Thursday. Four of the men are from suburban St. Louis, five are from Chicago and two are from Chicago suburbs.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

On time, and on budget.

Those are the five words St. Louis Public Library executive director Waller McGuire is most excited to say about the $70 million renovation of the library's headquarters building.

Slave auctions were once commonplace in Missouri. Families were separated, people were property and the event of the auction itself was a harsh one.

In recognition of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War in 2011, the St. Louis American reports on the plan for several local organizations to reenact a slave auction -- right on the steps of the Old Courthouse in downtown St. Louis.

(Flickr Creative Commons User mdaines)

Vacant homes are a common sight in many metropolitan U.S. cities, but, apparently, St. Louis has more than most.

According to U.S. Census data, St. Louis has the second highest rate of home vacancy among major U.S. cities.

(Julie Bierach, St. Louis Public Radio)

The City of St. Louis and Stray Rescue are taking additional measures to encourage responsible pet ownership in the City of St. Louis.

This week, the City's Animal Control Officers will begin issuing tickets for fines from $100 to $500 for those who violate city animal laws and ordinances. The City will also enforce animal abuse violations, including illegal chaining and dogfighting.

Chad Williams, Saint Louis University Medical Center

St. Louis is joining the National Children's Study, the largest long-term study of child health ever conducted in the United States.

The study will follow 100,000 children nationwide from before birth to age 21.

Local study leader Louise Flick of Saint Louis University's School of Public Health says more than 4,000 children from St. Louis City, Jefferson County, and southwestern Illinois will be asked to participate.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Authorities say 19-year-old William Mack Sapp of south St. Louis County is charged with second-degree assault and leaving the scene of an accident. He is jailed on $500,000 bond following his arrest on Wednesday. It wasn't immediately clear if Sapp had an attorney.
The other alleged racer, 19-year-old Trenton Pinckard of Glen Carbon, Ill., was charged earlier this week with leaving the scene of an accident.

(Flickr Creative Commons User Robert S. Donovan)

The president of Custom Janitorial Services and Supplies is facing federal charges alleging he embezzled nearly $1 million.

The St. Louis Business Journal reports that 54-year-old Herman Schamber of St. Louis worked out of the main Alexandria, Va. office of National Janitorial Services Inc.  and also owned and operated the another company, Custom Janitorial Services, out of the East Rutherford, N.J. area. The Business Journal explains:


(Flickr Creative Commons User Daniel Leininger)

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released data today about the state of unemployment over the past year for the St. Louis Mo.-Ill metropolitan area. We have some of the highlights for you:

  • St. Louis Mo.-Ill. registered an unemployment rate of 9.3 percent in October 2010 (not seasonally adjusted).
  • Nationally, the unemployment rate was 9.0 percent in October 2010, not seasonally adjusted.
  • Employment rose in St. Louis at a rate of 0.1 percent, but not as much as it did nationally, 0.5 percent.

So who was getting hired?

Bars in St. Louis that are thinking about applying for an exemption to the city's smoking ban will have to count any tents they use to expand seating areas toward the square footage total that allows them to get that exemption.

The city's ban includes language that lets bars smaller than 2,000 square feet and where "the serving of food is only incidental to the consumption" of alcoholic beverages to allow their patrons to smoke until January 1, 2016.

So why do tents matter?

(Casino Celebration)

A Las Vegas-based gaming company has entered a deal to help finance and operate the proposed casino at the Chain of Rocks bridge in north St. Louis.

The financing by the numbers:

(Flickr creative commons user HAM guy)

If you heard that a barge hit the Martin Luther King bridge, it's true, but don't worry about adjusting your commute to avoid this part of the mighty Mississippi.