Stacey Newman

The five state representatives who could replace Joe Keaveny: State Reps. Gina Mitten, Jake Hummel, Michele Kratky, Karla May and Stacey Newman.
Jason Rosenbaum, Carolina Hidalgo and Tim Bommel | St. Louis Public Radio & House Communications

Few events in Missouri politics make party committee members more popular than an unexpected vacancy.

That’s because when someone leaves an office before their term is up, these elected party stalwarts are charged with picking a nominee for a special election. The decision becomes especially important when the vacancy is in an area dominated by a particular party — which happens to be the case with soon-to-be former state Sen. Joe Keaveny.

Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards greets phone-bank volunteer Maxine Clark at Hillary Clinton's St. Louis campaign headquarters Sun. Mar. 13, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The president of Planned Parenthood says the effort in the Missouri legislature to bar abortion providers from receiving any funds from Medicaid is a waste of taxpayers’ money.

Under existing law, state and federal funds can only cover abortions in the case of rape, incest or when it’s necessary to save a woman’s life.

Rep. Stacey Newman (left) and St. Louis circuit attorney Jennifer Joyce (center) listen to Jackson County prosecutor Jean Peters Baker as Baker announces her support for Newman's legislation on February 29, 2016.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The prosecutors in Missouri's two largest cities are joining with pediatricians to support legislation that would make it a crime to leave a loaded weapon accessible to children.

Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights, is the sponsor of the bill, which makes it a felony if a gun owner "knowingly fails to secure a readily available, loaded deadly weapon in the presence of a child less than 17 years of age." A weapon would be considered secure if it had a functioning trigger lock, was kept in a safe, or was unloaded.

St. Louis Public Radio file art

Missouri lawmakers are back in Jefferson City as they prepare to kick off the 2016 legislative session at noon today.

In addition to passing the state budget, they're expected to tackle several other issues, including ethics reform and Gov. Jay Nixon's push to build a new NFL stadium for the Rams.

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

The push to make life better for women inside the Missouri Capitol strikes a chord for people like Kelly Schultz. One of the main lessons she learned about dealing with harassment is the importance of having a structure in place.

Before she embarked on a 16-year career in and around the Missouri Capitol, Schultz worked at a central Missouri police station. There, Schultz faced sexual harassment from one of her male officers.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce has called Amendment 5 "a disaster." She's been heaping criticism on the "gun rights" measure for months.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

When Amendment 5 was put before voters last August, 602,863 Missourians cast their ballots in favor of a measure aimed at bolstering the Show Me State’s gun rights.

It’s safe to say St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce was not among those voters.

State Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights
Marshall Griffin I St. Louis Public Radio

The Politically Speaking podcast team of Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcomes state Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights, to this week's show.

Newman, whose 87th district includes some of the region’s most affluent suburbs, discusses at length her ongoing role in two of the state’s most controversial topics:  gun rights and photo IDs at the polls.

Newman’s district includes all of Clayton and parts of Ladue, Richmond Heights and Webster Groves, as well as Washington University and Fontbonne University.

Voting booths
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to two measures to establish early voting, also known as "advance voting."

The first, House Joint Resolution 90, would allow for early voting if voters pass a proposed constitutional amendment. The second is the implementing bill, HB 2271.  

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to its version of the gun control nullification bill, but not before softening the language a bit.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Medical personnel who wish to opt out of participating in procedures that violate their religious or personal beliefs are one step closer to being allowed to do so legally in Missouri.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed yet another bill that would expand the rights of gun owners and reduce the role of the state Department of Revenue.

(Rep. Leara's campaign site)

Updated at 2:00 p.m. with quotes from State Reps. Mike Leara (R) and Stacey Newman (D).

Lawmakers proposing gun control legislation could end up in prison under a bill introduced by a Missouri House Republican.

Rep. Mike Leara, of St. Louis County, said Tuesday that he has no illusions that his bill actually will pass and become law.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Legislation that would revive three benevolent tax credits that died last year has been passed by the Missouri House.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

If passed, House Bill 110 would only allow the Governor to appoint a temporary placeholder who would not be eligible to run in the special election.  House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem), the bill’s sponsor, says it’s not a deliberate swipe at Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

Free gun locks will be given out Friday at City Hall in St. Louis
M Glasgow | Flickr

A St. Louis County lawmaker plans to file legislation that would require background checks on anyone who buys a firearm at a gun show.

State Representative Stacey Newman (D, Richmond Heights) says her proposal would close the so-called “gun show loophole” in Missouri.

“Right now, federal background checks are only done through licensed dealers," Newman said.  "That exempts gun shows where people can purchase unlimited amounts of weapons, including assault weapons.”

Official State Photo / State of Missouri House of Representatives

Updated at 8:35 a.m. Tuesday to correct the spelling of Stacey Newman's name.

Updated with comments from Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman

Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman has won the special Democratic primary for the 87th District in St. Louis County, according to results posted on the Missouri Secretary of State website.   

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 1:15 pm to reflect that the maps were drawn by a panel of judges, not the General Assembly.

In the first election after redistricting, it’s not uncommon for former colleagues from the same party to square off for a seat in the Missouri General Assembly.

So the August primary between Democrats Susan Carlson and Stacey Newman for the new 87th District in St. Louis County was nothing unusual - until the unofficial results showed a one-vote margin of victory for Newman. The plot thickened when ballot irregularities made it impossible to conduct a recount.

By now, the two women planned to be helping out other candidates with general election opponents. But instead, they’re back out on the campaign trail for themselves.

voxefxtm | Flickr

Updated 3:25 p.m. with reaction from Stacey Newman.

Updated 3:10 p.m. to clarify that the two precincts were, indeed, in two separate Missouri House districts, confirming the importance to the issue to the race between Stacey Newman and Susan Carlson.

Updated with quotes from Rita Heard Days.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls.

Before the vote, Democrats hammered away at Republicans’ arguments that the bill would combat voter fraud, saying there hasn’t been a documented case of voter fraud in decades – and that the bill does nothing to deal with voter registration fraud.  State Representative Todd Richardson (R, Poplar Bluff) disagreed.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A Democratic state Representative from the St. Louis area has officially asked Secretary of State Robin Carnahan to investigate whether Congressman Todd Akin broke any rules by voting in Town and Country despite having an official residence in Wildwood.

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