STLPR Talk Shows | St. Louis Public Radio

STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Wednesday's Legal Roundtable featured a panel of law experts, William Freivogel, Greg Magarian and Mark Smith.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

A lot of news coming out of the U.S. Supreme Court this week. First, a ruling that allows parts of President Donald Trump’s travel ban to go forward. And then, a ruling on case involving a Missouri church, Trinity Lutheran in Columbia, that sought a state grant to put a soft surface on its preschool playground that was denied funding.

Author Candice Millard's book "Hero of the Empire" looks into Winston Churchill's exploits during the Boer War.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed “Hero of the Empire,” a book by New York Times-bestselling author Candice Millard about Winston Churchill’s experiences in early adulthood as a reporter during the Boer War.

Nate Larson's photography and oral history project "Centroid Towns" documents life at towns that were, at one point, designated the mean center of U.S. population.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

“The Centroid” refers to the point of the United States’ mean center of population. Baltimore-based photographer Nate Larson has taken this construction and run with it, documenting life in the “Centroid Towns,” which have been calculated by the U.S. Census Bureau since 1790. Here's how that's done.

Dr. Sheandra Brown and Kristy Jackson are two local educators who recently spoke at The Crooked Room Conference at UMSL, which focused on improving outcomes for African American girls and women in education.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s a growing body of research that shows African-American girls are punished in school at rates much higher than girls of any other race.

Andrea Purnell and Gregory Carr discussed "Tinderbox," Carr's play based on the East St. Louis Race Riots of 1917, on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

July 2, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of one of the bloodiest race riots in the 20th century: the East St. Louis Race Riots of 1917

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Gregory Carr, an instructor of speech and theater at Harris-Stowe State University, and actress Andrea Purnell joined the program to discuss “Tinderbox,” his play based on the history of the event. 

Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City, 2016
Ethan Weston | Flickr

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines," we took a look at a top news story from the week.

This week, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jo Mannies to discuss Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens's interactions with the Missouri legislature and the recent special sessions.

Painkiller
Tom Walker | Flickr | http://bit.ly/22McgqC

Last year set a record for the number of drug overdose deaths in the St. Louis region, most of them opioid-related. Gun violence has also long been a problem in St. Louis. Although there’s no evidence to prove the rise in the prevalence of both issues is related, the solution to them is interconnected, advocates say.

Logan Ely is the chef behind Square 1 Project, a pop-up restaurant concept.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Sound Bites is produced in partnership with Sauce Magazine, our monthly installment exploring cuisine in the St. Louis area.

Chef Logan Ely has been around the globe and back a few times since growing up in St. Louis. He spent time at Chicago’s North Pond Restaurant after graduating Forest Park Community College’s culinary program and from there went to Hong Kong and New York.

What summer reads should be on our list? You tell us.
meg | Flickr

Well, it’s officially summer now – and with that comes time spent by the pool, on vacation or maybe even a few “sick days” spent at home. With that in mind, we brought in three local book experts to give us suggestions of their top summer reads.

We’re focusing on books for adults this time around but, in a few weeks, we’ll also discuss children’s book recommendations.

You can find links to each book discussed below, but our guest from Left Bank Books made this handy list as well. 

Players on the Arch Rival All Stars roller derby team run drills during practice on Monday, June 12, 2017, ahead of the Sibling Rivalry invitational.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

As of 9 p.m. on a Monday earlier this month,  the temperature had not sunk below 90 degrees all day. Despite the lethargic heat, the St. Louis Skatium, an un-air-conditioned, no-frills skating rink in south city, was bustling with action.

For two hours, the Arch Rival All Stars, 20 of the best women’s flat track roller derby players in St. Louis, have been running drills and scrimmaging.

Nedim Ramic and Anna Crosslin discussed the issues refugees face today in light of World Refugee Day on June 20.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Tuesday marks World Refugee Day, a designation made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The number of refugees and displaced persons in the world is higher than it has ever been since World War II, with some 65.5 million people displaced throughout the world right now.

(via Flickr/wild_turkey5300)

Facts and fiction continue to swirl about mosquito-borne illnesses like the Zika and West Nile viruses. On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed what you need to know about such illnesses and how to prevent them.

Saint Louis University is currently at the forefront of trying to develop a Zika vaccine. Sarah George, a researcher with the Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development, joined the program on Tuesday to discuss her research and prevention tips.

Lisa Servon, Ray Boshara and Veta Jeffrey discussed the growing trend of Americans opting out of traditional banking.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Unbanking – you may have heard the term before, but what does it actually mean? On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed “The Unbanking of America” with author Lisa Servon, who researches why a growing number of people in the United States are turning to alternatives other than traditional banks.

Stephen Lord, retiring music director at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, joined St. Louis on the Air on Monday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Stephen Lord has been coming to St. Louis for 37 seasons of Opera Theatre Saint Louis in some sort of role with the company. For the last 25 years, he’s been music director, but after this season closes at the end of this month, he’ll step down from that position.

David Baron, the author of "American Eclipse," discussed the upcoming total solar eclipse that will pass over parts of St. Louis on Aug. 21.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Author David Baron is not kidding when he says he’s been looking forward to the total solar eclipse that will occur on American soil on Aug. 21, 2017, for the past 19 years. In 1998, he saw his first total solar eclipse. He’s now seen five different total solar eclipses around the world … but never one over his homeland of the United States.

FBI and ATF agents enter the the home of James T. Hodgkinson, the man identified as shooting a Republican member of congress, in Belleville, Illinois on June 14, 2017.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines and the headlines this week reached all the way from Alexandria, Virginia, to Belleville, Illinois. We focused this week’s segment on the local connection to the shooting, which was perpetrated by a 66-year-old man from Belleville, James T. Hodgkinson.

June 12 marked the one-year anniversary of the Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando, the deadliest terror attack on American soil since September 11, 2001. Forty-nine people died in the shooting and 53 people were injured in the attack.

A view inside Olive + Oak, which is located in Webster Groves.
Sauce Magazine

Sound Bites is produced in partnership with Sauce Magazine, our monthly installment exploring cuisine in the St. Louis area.

In this year’s Sauce Magazine Readers Choice Awards, two local dining favorites became clear: Olive + Oak in Webster Groves and Katie’s Pizza & Pasta in Rock Hill.

De Nichols, a local artist and community organizer behind "Sticky Note to Self" and a variety of other community-focused projects, joined St. Louis on the Air on Wednesday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Can a reflection jotted on a sticky note spark social change? Can it help community activists feel less alone? Those are questions local artist and activist De Andrea Nichols is answering with her project “Sticky Note To Self.”

“From any path you take always get back to happy,” reads one sticky note. “There are lessons in our losses,” reads another. You can see them all on the Facebook page for the project here.

Jeanette Mott Oxford and Leslie Yoffie discussed hunger in the St. Louis reigon with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Wednesday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

It may be hard to believe, but some 42.2 million Americans go hungry each day. That’s more than one in eight people in the country. That’s according to Michelle Stuffmann, director of outreach and communications for MAZON, a Jewish Response to Hunger, whose exhibit is slated to travel to St. Louis in July.

James Hodgkinson of Belleville protests outside of the United States Post Office in downtown Belleville in this file photo from 2012.
Derik Holtmann | Belleville News Democrat

 

Updated June 14 at 1:10 p.m. with comment from lifelong acquaintance -  Metro East residents are coming to terms with the notion that one of their neighbors has been identified as the shooter at a Congressional Republican baseball practice Wednesday morning in suburban Washington, D.C.  

Many national media outlets are quoting unnamed federal law enforcement officials as saying the gunman was James T. Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville.

How can you protect yourself from the spate of spams targeting older Americans?
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

One in three Missourians are over the age of 60. That number is only set to increase in coming years. There’s also been a recent increase in the number of cons targeting older Americans – scammers fooling the group of people out of billions of dollars per year (yes, you read that right), often aided by digital technology.

“We Live Here,” a popular podcast from St. Louis Public Radio exploring race and class in the St. Louis region, is back on Tuesday with the first episode in its third season. The style of the show has changed over the course of its first two seasons, but season three marks the most dramatic shift.

Stephanie Leffler is CEO of OneSpace, which connects workers and employers for short-term contract work. Miriam Cherry is a professor at SLU Law School who studies the gig economy and the rights of worker's and employers.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The “gig economy” is growing with an estimated 20 to 30 percent of American and European working-age population participating in some kind of independent work.

Defined as “a labor market characterized by the prevalence of short-term contracts or freelance work as opposed to permanent jobs,” we spoke with two local experts about how the gig economy is at play in the St. Louis region on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Nina Ferrigno, Christopher Stark and Scott Andrews discussed this year's Missouri Chamber Music Festival on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The seventh annual Missouri Chamber Music Festival returns to St. Louis this week with a slate of classical chamber-style performances at Washington University and in Webster Groves.

A married couple, pianist Nina Ferrigno and Scott Andrews, principal clarinet at the St. Louis Symphony, direct the festival, which they started in 2010 to educate and promote chamber music in the community.

Dr. Jonathan Smith and Sharon Stevens joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh for a discussion about the depictions of African-American men and boys in the media.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Negative public perception of African-American men and boys in American society has long been documented. Discussion in recent years has turned to how depictions of black men and boys in different media contribute to this stereotypical image.

Lord Alan Watson was in St. Louis this week for the Churchill Museum's award to Sen. John Danforth. He spoke with St. Louis on the Air about British and American politics as well as the award.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the week's news from a different sort of angle than we normally do.

This week, host Don Marsh was joined by Lord Alan Watson to talk about the Churchill Museum's award to Sen. John Danforth as well as his take on the British elections, the Trump administration and the political leadership today as compared to Churchill's time.

Pat Potter, a former nurse in St. Louis, is noted in the field for her textbook "Fundamentals of Nursing," which is used to teach new nursing students across the country. She retired earlier this spring.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Patricia Potter is noted in the field of nursing for her textbook “Fundamentals of Nursing,” which is used for new nursing students across the country, as well as her groundbreaking teaching of resiliency in nursing, which helps nurses manage stress by combating “compassion fatigue.”

Earlier this spring, Potter retired after 46 years as a nurse, 41 of those she spent at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. At the time of her retirement, Potter was the hospital’s director of research.

Amanda Mohl, Dr. Rumi Price and Carmen Guynn, all advocates in the area of human trafficking, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the issue in the region.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In this month’s issue of The Atlantic, author Alex Tizon writes of a woman who spent 56 years in his family’s household as a slave. “My Family’s Slave,” which has inspired copious dialogue and backlash about the author’s intent, uncovered a side of human trafficking we rarely talk about.

Richard Cohen, Vivian Anderson Watt and Cecilia Nadal discuss "Between Worlds" with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Later this week, Gitana Productions will debut a production that utilizes acting, poetry, music and dance to get across a point that we share common history and similarities between people. The production is called “Between Worlds: An American Journey,” and opens tomorrow night.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by three people involved with “Between Worlds.”

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