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Author Joe Johnston has several appearances in Jefferson County this weekend as part of the county's bicentennial celebration.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s well known that people eat different foods in different parts of the United States.

The culture and history of one of those areas – the American South – is explored in a new book by St. Louis native Joe Johnston. He’s the author of “Grits to Glory: How Southern Cookin’ Got So Good.”

Jerod Broadbooks (R), a college student from Wildwood, won a contest to perform with 30 Seconds to Mars.
Carrie Zukoski

By day Jerod Broadbooks is a student-athlete at Lindenwood University. He studies music education and is on the track team. On Monday night, however, Broadbooks, who is also a guitarist, got the chance of a lifetime to perform onstage at Hollywood Casino Amphitheater with the rock band 30 Seconds to Mars.

Broadbooks said the experience started when he heard an advertisement on 105.7 The Point while at his summer job as a lifeguard in Wildwood.

R. Marie Griffith is the director of Washington University’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics.
Randall Kahn

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

As the #MeToo movement continues to gain momentum throughout the United States, many Christian churches and leaders have increasingly come under fire – and have responded in a variety of ways.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss what’s been termed the #ChurchToo movement as part of the ongoing international conversation about sexual harassment and assault in various sectors of society.

Joining him to talk about it will be Washington University’s Marie Griffith, the John C. Danforth Distinguished Professor in the Humanities.

Left, Caryn Dugan and Dr. James Loomis discussed plant-based diets with host Don Marsh on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

While in 2014 just 1 percent of U.S. consumers claimed to be vegan, in 2017, about 6 percent made that claim. With a 600 percent increase in just three years, and veg-friendly options becoming more commonplace in St. Louis, it is safe to say that this diet trend is not just a fad – it’s here to stay.

Justin Fisher’s documentary about the evolving recording industry screens at 4 p.m. Saturday as part of the 2018 St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

A treasure trove of St. Louis-based filmmaking talent will be in the spotlight throughout the next two weekends as Cinema St. Louis’ annual Filmmakers Showcase gets underway on Friday.

One of the locally driven films set to screen Saturday is “Gateway Sound,” which was produced and directed by Justin Fisher, an audio engineer and educator. The documentary explores the state of the recording industry in St. Louis and beyond.

Fisher joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh Wednesday for a conversation about the project and how recording professionals are adapting in an age of music streaming, slumping record sales and easily accessible recording technology.

Tom Murray and Ed Reggi joined host Don Marsh to discuss the opening of “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Opening the curtain on themes such as forbidden love and secret identities, Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” opens Thursday in Grand Center.

This classic farcical comedy set in 1890s London follows the lives of two friends using the same alias, “Ernest,” for their clandestine activities. “At the core of this play, it’s really about who are we in public versus who are we in private,” Ed Reggi said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

From left, Kelly Sopek, Julie Zimmermann and Payne Gray spoke with host Don Marsh about their recent anthropological work at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Long before Lewis and Clark passed through the Gateway to the West, this region was home to indigenous Americans including the Cahokians.

While this civilization was primarily located about 15 minutes east of St. Louis at today’s Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, settlements were scattered across the region including the area that is now Edwardsville.

Greg Magarian is a law professor at Washington University and previously clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

President Trump on Monday evening chose Brett Kavanaugh to fill the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh will now go before the U.S. Senate for confirmation.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Greg Magarian, J.D., professor of law at Washington University, about the nomination and its local implications. Magarian previously clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens.

In addition to being a cancer survivor, Kathy McGee (at left) is also now an artist. Her creative growth is the result of her longtime participation in Arts As Healing classes. Vicki Friedman (at right) is the organization’s executive director.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Kathy McGee had just recently completed her cancer treatments when she visited Arts As Healing for the first time. She wasn’t exactly sure what she was getting into or how to prepare, but her daughter had encouraged her to give this new opportunity a try. So McGee grabbed the adult coloring book she’d been enjoying lately and headed to class.

“I show up with [the] book in hand, and the class had absolutely nothing to do with that – absolutely nothing,” McGee said on St. Louis on the Air. “But I was greeted by Vicki [Friedman], and I was immediately pulled in because of her warm smile, because of the affection that she had for all of us.”

Travel writer, radio personality and avid road tripper Bill Clevlen spoke with host Don Marsh on Monday’s "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From a vacuum cleaner museum to the world’s tallest mailbox, the United States is abundant with unique destinations.

“These are things you’re only going to be able to do in America,” Bill Clevlen said, on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, about the destinations in his first travel book. Inspired by his own hobby of road tripping and a desire to spread uplifting stories, Clevlen shares his experiences in “100 Things to Do in America Before You Die.”

Attendees at Friday's "People's Ribbon Cutting" celebrate near the Gateway Arch grounds in St. Louis.
Wiley Price I St. Louis American

Darryl Gray made something abundantly clear at Friday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Arch grounds: The diverse gathering of elected officials, candidates and St. Louisans wasn’t a do-over.

After a group of white officials cut the ribbon in front of the Arch’s new visitors’ center and museum sparked public outcry Tuesday, Gray emphasized that Friday’s event was aimed at showcasing St. Louis’ diversity — and sending a message that racial and ethnic minorities need a place at the decision-making table.

Gilbert and Sullivan's “H.M.S Pinafore” opens Union Avenue Opera’s season.
John Lamb | Union Avenue Opera

Union Avenue Opera (UAO) will open its 24th festival season July 6 on a light note with the Gilbert and Sullivan comedic operetta, “H.M.S. Pinafore.” It was one of the British duo’s most famous pieces and their first big hit, UAO founder and artistic director Scott Schoonover explained to St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

"Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" is one of the series discussed in Weitekamp's presentation at the St. Louis Science Center Friday evening.
via Flickr | Marcin Wichary

On the first Friday of every month, the St. Louis Science Center welcomes adults to take a look at the reality behind science fiction. This month’s event highlights two staples in popular culture: Star Trek and Babylon 5.

Doris Fiddmont Frazier, center, and other parishioners worship at Union Baptist Church, a fixture in Westland Acres.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Those familiar with St. Louis neighborhoods are probably also familiar with the concept of gentrification. The latest episode of the We Live Here podcast, “Paved over Histories”, tackles this issue with its eye on the west St. Louis County community of Westland Acres.

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha talked with Don Marsh about her book, “What the Eyes Don’t See: A Story of Crisis Resistance and Hope in an American City” at the St. Louis County Library on June 28.
St. Louis

In 2014, the state of Michigan switched the city of Flint’s water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River. After the switch residents began complaining about the water but government officials claimed it was safe to drink.

Taking the government at its word, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician at the city’s public hospital, continued to encourage parents and children to drink the water. However, the water wasn’t safe and it was contaminated with lead, something she discovered totally by accident.

Officials and National Parks Service staff cut the ribbon to the new Gateway Arch visitor center and museum Tuesday, July 3, 2018.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

The Arch grounds reopening is happening again after photos of the initial ribbon-cutting on Tuesday showed a lack of racial diversity.

As the common saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. The photos showing city officials and guests cutting the ribbon at the ceremony organized by Gateway Arch Park Foundation were worth three: “Arch So White,” or #ArchSoWhite on social media.

Historian Bonnie Stepenoff discussed risk many St. Louis children faced in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Many are familiar with “Little Boy Blue,” a poem by Eugene Field that paints the sad picture of the little toy dog and the little toy soldier waiting decades for the toddler who had kissed them goodnight to return.

The death of children in the late 1800 and early 1900s was not uncommon, even in middle class families such as Field’s, due to lack of knowledge about contagious diseases and certain kinds of infections, historian Bonnie Stepenoff told host Don Marsh on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Executive director of Healing Action Katie Rhoades shared her own experience of human trafficking on Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Aaron Doerr | St. Louis Public Radio

Human trafficking remains a problem throughout the world, but it is closer to home than we often realize.

“It’s a tremendous issue here in Missouri,” Missouri State Highway Patrol Captain Norman Murphy said regarding both sexual and labor exploitation.

Left, Matt Sorrell, David Sandusky and Otis Walker ignite a conversation about barbecue with host Don Marsh on Monday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

For the backyard barbecuer ready to light up the grill for the Fourth of July, there’s no need to stress about which method or recipe is best.

“You can have a guy driving a Corvette, and another guy out here driving a Mustang, but if you can’t drive, it doesn’t make no difference,” Otis Walker said making an analogy for various barbecuing methods on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air.

A rare copy of the Declaration of Independence is currently on view at the John M. Olin Library on the Danforth Campus.
James Byard | Washington University in St. Louis

Two hundred forty-two years ago this week, the American colonies formally declared their independence from Great Britain. But the Continental Congress’ adoption of the handwritten document – and the accompanying revolution – would not be televised or tweeted.

Instead, printed versions of the Declaration of Independence were quickly posted on courthouse doors throughout the colonies, where people gathered to read and discuss what had occurred.

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