STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Ali Fields, Aisha Lubinski and David Bachman joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss their eating disorders.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

For the estimated 575,000 Missourians struggling with an eating disorder of some kind, a huge barrier to overcome is having the vocabulary to describe the problem. That was certainly the case for Ali Fields.

“I was an anxious and uncomfortable kid, I had low self-esteem and anxiety,” Fields told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. “I did not know that [an eating disorder] was what it was. At age 8, I did not have the language to communicate that something was wrong.”

Paula Poundstone
Paula Poundstone

If you listen to St. Louis Public Radio at 11 a.m. on Saturday mornings or 10 a.m. on Sunday mornings, you definitely know of the guest who joined St. Louis on the Air on Tuesday: Paula Poundstone.

Poundstone will visit St. Louis for a performance at the Sheldon on Saturday evening and joined host Don Marsh to discuss her career, comic relief in stressful times, her upcoming performance and a new book set to be released in May titled “The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness.

Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday, St. Louis on the Air’s monthly legal roundtable returned to address pressing issues of the law with a panel of local legal experts. This month’s focus? The proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Durrie Bouscaren has been reporting extensively on this matter and its local impact. Here’s how Missouri fares in cost estimates for the GOP’s health care plan.

Robert Schowengerdt, Abbey Spencer and Catherine Klene discussed the local craft brewing scene on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

According to the St. Louis Brewers Guild, there are now more than 50 breweries in the St. Louis region — that’s the most since the boom in craft brewing began over a decade ago.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh highlighted some of the local brewing scene alongside Sauce Magazine’s Managing Editor Catherine Klene. Every year, Sauce Magazine produces an entire issue focused on beer, which is on newsstands now and available online.

The Missouri Capitol building.
St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh checked in with St. Louis Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Marshall Griffin, who reports out of Jefferson City. 

Griffin gave us an update on the Missouri Legislature and filled us in Senate Bill 98, the so-called “bathroom bill.” Both Missouri House and Senate are about to start their spring breaks, before reconvening 

Bruiser Queen (Morgan Nusbaum and Jason Potter) stand before a giant mural
Provided by Bruiser Queen

Today's the day! We've reached the end of our local Tiny Desk Contest countdown. Our final favorite to highlight? Bruiser Queen

This week, we highlighted the favorite local Tiny Desk Contest submissions ahead of a Tiny Desk STL Happy Hour concert on Thursday,  at Anew, the rooftop venue above the Big Brothers and Big Sisters building in Grand Center.

Wally Siewert, the director of the center for ethics in public life at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, discussed money and politics on Thursday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this month, the spotlight was cast on the brand new nonprofit called A New Missouri Inc. Formed by Gov. Eric Greitens’ campaign treasurer, the group’s focus will be to advocate for the governor’s policy agenda. Its nonprofit status assigned by the IRS means that A New Missouri can take unlimited contributions and it does not have to release information about who gave those contributions.

Major Garrett.
CBS News

By this point, most have taken note of President Donald Trump’s distaste of the press. But what is it like to be assigned to cover the president under such antagonistic conditions? On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Major Garrett, CBS chief White House correspondent, joined host Don Marsh to discuss covering Trump during the 2016 election and into his presidency.

Kenny DeShields sits at a wooden table smiling wryly
Provided by Kenny DeShields

This week, we're counting down favorite local Tiny Desk Contest submissions ahead of a Tiny Desk STL Happy Hour concert on Thursday,  Anew, the rooftop venue above the Big Brothers and Big Sisters building in Grand Center.

More than 50 St. Louis area acts submitted to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest this year. There were more than  6,000 entrees nationally.

After an intense voting round, we've narrowed down the top five local submissions to the contest, which we are highlighting on our website and on St. Louis on the Air this week. Earlier this week, we brought you interviews with Monkh and the People and Roland Johnson. Yesterday, we heard from Augusta Bottoms Consort.

Today, we turn our attention to Kenny DeShields.

Jessica Hentoff, the executive director of Circus Harmony, recently lost her father, who died in January at the age of 91. She joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss a tribute she's planning for him.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In January, Nat Hentoff, a syndicated columnist and writer noted for his jazz criticism and attention to First Amendment issues, died at the age of 91.

His daughter, Jessica Hentoff, is a St. Louis resident and will pay tribute to her father’s work in an upcoming performance featuring Circus Harmony, the organization of which she is executive director.

Gwen Moore and Percy Green joined "St. Louis on the Air" to discuss the Missouri History Museum's recent exhibit "#1 in Civil Rights."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

If you remember the day two St. Louis activists climbed 125 feet up a construction ladder on the unfinished north leg of the Gateway Arch, you remember a key moment of the civil rights movement in St. Louis. Percy Green was one of the people who climbed the Arch on July 14, 1964.

Band members stand holding various stringed instruments from left to right are Gloria Attoun, Michael Bauermeister, Paul Ovaitt, Rebecca Mayer.
Provided by Augusta Bottoms Consort

This week, we're counting down favorite local Tiny Desk Contest submissions ahead of a Tiny Desk STL Happy Hour concert on Thursday, March 16, at Anew, the local rooftop venue above the Big Brothers and Big Sisters building in Grand Center.

More than 50 local acts submitted to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest this year. There were over 6,000 entires nationally.

Lebanon, Ill. Mayor Rich Wilken presented Lebanese photographer Fadi BouKaram with a key to the city.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

As you may have heard featured earlier today on “Morning Edition,” Fadi BouKaram, a photographer from the Middle Eastern country of Lebanon, is on a unique journey throughout America.

BouKaram is traveling in an RV and is attempting to visit all of the communities in the United States named after his homeland.

Tiny Desk Saint Louis logo rooftop concert
Susannah Lohr

More than 50 local acts submitted to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest this year. There were over 6,000 entires nationally.

While the winner of the national contest, Tank and The Bangas,  has been crowned, we decided here at St. Louis Public Radio to ask for your help selecting a few local favorites. After an intense voting round, we've narrowed down the top five local submissions to the contest, which we'll be highlighting on our website and on St. Louis on the Air this week.

Beth Kobliner is author of "Make Your Kid A Money Genius."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh heard from Beth Kobliner, a financial journalist, who recently published “Make Your Kid A Money Genius (Even If You’re Not): A Parents’ Guide for Kids 3 to 23.” Previously, Kobliner published the New York Times bestseller “Get A Financial Life.”

Should financial conversations with your children really start as early as age three? For Kobliner, the answer is an emphatic ‘yes.’

Joan Lipkin, the artistic director of That Uppity Theatre Company, joined "St. Louis on the Air" on Friday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

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For the past six years, That Uppity Theatre Company has produced 50 short plays presented as part of a festival called “Briefs: A Festival of Short LGBTQ Plays.” The festival continues this weekend and it will be the last, said Joan Lipkin, artistic director of That Uppity Theatre Company.

Lyda Krewson in a February 2017 file photo.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

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On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, we discussed St. Louis Alderman Lyda Krewson’s historic Democratic primary win in the St. Louis mayoral race — which puts her one step closer to becoming St. Louis’ first mayor who is a woman.

Harris-Stowe State University President Dwaun Warmack discussed his recent meeting with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

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By now, you know the uproar over the photo: Kellyanne Conway with her feet on the Oval Office couch. While Conway has asserted she meant no disrespect, a huge amount of attention was diverted to that moment from what the actual event was about: A meeting of leaders of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with President Donald Trump.

What were they meeting about and what did they discuss? Harris-Stowe State University President Dwaun Warmack knows intimately: he was in the room (and, indeed, in the now-infamous picture) to meet with President Trump. In fact, Warmack was in D.C. for a lot more: he met with legislators and Cabinet leaders in order to drum up support and money for financially struggling HBCUs.

Hillary Frey, Maria Clay and Melanie Kenny discussed youth employment on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

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No matter the experience, whether lifeguarding at the pool, busing tables at a local restaurant or doing odd jobs around the neighborhood, summer jobs in our youth hold a special, nostalgic place in the lives of many Americans. But finding those jobs, which give the young employee important work experience going forward in life, is not as easy as it once was.

It is estimated that about 40,000 young people in the St. Louis region are unemployed and not in school. That’s according to STL Youth Jobs executive director Hillary Frey. The non-profit organization, which is entering its third season, is dedicated to helping 16 to 24-year-olds from struggling St. Louis city and county neighborhoods find summer employment.

Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the results of the municipal primary election on March 7.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

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Tuesday, March 7 marked the City of St. Louis primary municipal election — when St. Louis residents voted in aldermanic primary races, the mayoral primary, the comptroller primary and on Proposition S.

Alan Greenblatt, a reporter with Governing Magazine, joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss President Trump's relationships with U.S. cities.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

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In January, the term “sanctuary city” came back into the spotlight after President Donald Trump signed an executive order that would punish local governments that don't comply with federal immigration enforcement. No cities or counties in St. Louis are currently considered sanctuary areas, but some immigration advocates have called for St. Louis to join the ranks of Denver, Chicago, San Francisco and New York in noncompliance with the feds.

David Greenhaw, Ghazala Hayat and Mont Levy joined "St. Louis on the Air" to discuss "The Cave."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis on the Air

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An upcoming production from Arts & Faith St. Louis aims to connect Jewish, Christian and Muslim people together in the shared traditions and history of the Abrahamic faiths.

This radiation warning sign is one of many posted on the chain link fence surrounding part of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo.
File photo | Sarah Skiold-Hanlin | St. Louis Public Radio

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On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, we spoke with St. Louis Public Radio reporter Eli Chen about her story detailing environmental chronic stress related to the ongoing situation at Westlake Landfill.

Kent Coffel as Zorba and Dominic Dowdy-Windsor as Nikos in New Line Theatre's production of "Zorba"
Jill Ritter Lindberg

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Bill Siemering was instrumental in the founding of National Public Radio and the creation of "All Things Considered." Today, he runs Developing Radio Partners.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

National Public Radio will serve the individual: it will promote personal growth; it will regard the individual differences among men with respect and joy rather than derision and hate; it will celebrate the human experience as infinitely varied rather than vacuous and banal; it will encourage a sense of active constructive participation, rather than apathetic helplessness.

That’s an excerpt from a 1970 mission statement that Bill Siemering wrote at the outset of National Public Radio, of which he was one of the original organizers and its first program director.

Dr. Menzer Pehlivan (pictured front left) is one of the engineers featured in "Dream Big," a new IMAX film premiering at the Saint Louis Science Center.
MacGillivray Freeman

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Sidney Keys III, the founder of Books N Bros.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

If you Google the terms “boys and reading,” you will find thousands of results laying out the state of the gender gap between boys and girls when it comes to reading and literacy. “The Boys Have Fallen Behind,” writes Nicholas Kristof. “Why Women Read More than Men,” says NPR.

Six candidates for St. Louis mayor participate in a forum on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Last Wednesday, on Feb. 22, St. Louis Public Radio, in collaboration with 13 other community and media organizations, hosted a mayoral forum with six candidates who qualified ahead of the March primary. Joining the forum were: Antonio French (D), Lewis Reed (D) Lyda Krewson (D), Jeffrey Boyd (D), Tishaura Jones (D) and Andrew Jones (R).

Six candidates for St. Louis mayor participate in a forum on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Last Wednesday, on Feb. 22, St. Louis Public Radio, in collaboration with 13 other community and media organizations, hosted a mayoral forum with six candidates who qualified ahead of the March primary. Joining the forum were: Antonio French (D),  Lyda Krewson (D), Jeffrey Boyd (D), Tishaura Jones (D), Andrew Jones (R), and Lewis Reed (D).

St. Louis/East St. Louis native Harry Edwards is a renowned sociologist, specializing in sports protest.
Wikimedia Commons

No one who speaks out has ever been welcomed with open arms, for the most part, even when people say things like ‘I understand the message.’ The reality is that silence has been evil’s greatest and most consistently dependable ally.

So said Dr. Harry Edwards, a prominent sociologist who specialized his research and activism in the areas of sport, race and protest, on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air. He has also written several books, including “Revolt of the Black Athlete” and “The Struggle that Must Be.”

Edwards also happens to be a St. Louis native.

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