STLPR Talk Shows | St. Louis Public Radio

STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

The sushi burrito is from BLK MKT Eats.
Michelle Volansky for Sauce Magazine

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our friends at Sauce Magazine joined host Don Marsh to discuss the restaurant openings and closings you should know to plan your nights out in November.

Managing editors Catherine Klene and Heather Hughes joined the program to fill us in on this month’s “Hit List.” Here are their recommendations:

(via Flickr/SoumyadeepPaul, creative commons)

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Robbi Courtaway about supernatural activity in St. Louis.

Courtaway is the author of two books on the subject, "Spirits of St. Louis: A Ghostly Guide to the Mound City’s Unearthly Activities" and "Spirits of St. Louis II: The Return of the Gateway City Ghosts.”

Marsh has a ghost story of his own and wrote about it in his 2008 book, Flash Frames: Journey of a Journeyman Journalist.

Former University of Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The year 2015 was a busy and challenging one for former University of Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel.

In April, the winningest football coach in school history was awarded a contract extension that would have kept him with the university through 2021 with a salary in excess of $4 million per year.

Bill Freivogel, Douglas Beach and Mark Smith joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three legal experts about some of the latest issues of local interest pertaining to the law.

Joining him for the discussion were:

J. Samuel Davis (L) and Ron Himes (R) joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer, provided | St. Louis Public Radio

Actor and St. Louis native Robert Guillaume died at the age of 89 on Tuesday, October 24.

His role as the butler Benson won him Emmys for best supporting actor in a comedy in 1979 and best actor in a comedy in 1985, making him the first African-American to win either.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with members of the local acting community about how Guillaume influenced their careers.

Sidney Watson, the Jane and Bruce Robert Professor at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Don Marsh talked with Saint Louis University health law professor Sidney Watson about the just released 2018 premiums for policies through the Affordable Care Act and discuss how Missourians and St. Louisans will fare.

This Behind the Headlines discussion was a follow-up to a conversation about what's happening with healthcare in the United States.

Stephanie Snow, a staff attorney with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, standing in front of one of the panels that's part of an exhibit about Alexander Hamilton.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

An exhibit on display now at the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse in downtown St. Louis features the life and work of Alexander Hamilton.

Hamilton was one of the Founding Fathers, the first Secretary of the Treasury and a fervent advocate of a strong national government.

Bob Brody (L) and Robin Feder (R)
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) in St. Louis has been serving deaf children throughout the country for more than one hundred years.

“It was founded in 1914 by an ear, nose, and throat doctor in St. Louis, Dr. Max Goldstein,” said Robin Feder, CID’s executive director who previously taught at the school. “He had gone to Europe and seen deaf children being taught to talk there and thought he wanted to bring that new educational philosophy back to St. Louis.”

CID is different than most schools for deaf children in that teachers do not teach sign language.

Florence Pretz's original design for the Billiken, patented in 1908.
Saint Louis University Archives

If you walk through the Saint Louis University campus, you’ll almost certainly run into their unusual mascot, the Billiken, in some form. The Billiken is a pointy-headed, grinning imp covered in white fur, and it’s everywhere: banners, statues—even parking spaces outside the admissions office are reserved for future Billikens.

As SLU is in the midst of celebrating its founding 200 years ago, an in-depth look at the university's unusual mascot seemed timely.

What exactly is a Billiken?

A sampling of SLU students at the student center had a guess.

Lara Hamdan / St. Louis Public Radio

Catholics and Lutherans are coming together in the spirit of reconciliation for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, a schism from the Roman Catholic Church initiated by Martin Luther in 1517.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Deacon Carl Sommer, adjunct professor of church history, registrar, and coordinator of assessment at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary and Pastor Keith Holste, co-pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Webster Groves and co-director of the Lutheran School of Theology.

Dennis Sparger, music director and conductor of the Bach Society of Saint Louis.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

The Bach Society of Saint Louis is participating in a 500th anniversary commemoration concert drawing inspiration from the Reformation. The Reformation was a schism from the Roman Catholic Church initiated by Martin Luther in 1517.

“I think [Luther’s] influence in the area of music was probably just as powerful as it was in theology,” said Dennis Sparger, music director and conductor of the Bach Society. “He praised music to the highest level and really encouraged us all to use all of our music to praise God.”

LaShell Eikerenkoetter and Rev. Darryl Gray have each been arrested during the Stockley protests.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

The Rev. Darryl Gray marched alongside iconic civil rights figures, including Ralph Abernathy, who succeeded Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Lara Hamdan / St. Louis Public Radio

More people are dying annually from overdosing on opioids compared to HIV, car accidents and gun violence. And Missouri is no exception.

“The opioid crisis is the biggest public health emergency of our lifetimes,” said Rachel Winograd, assistant research professor at the Missouri Institute of Mental Health at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

 She said the clear hot-spots of deaths in Missouri are in the St. Louis area.

Actor William Shatner
(via Flickr/Crosa, Creative Commons)

William Shatner is best known for his portrayal of Captain James T. Kirk on Star Trek: The Original Series. The television series ran for only three seasons, from 1966-1969, though the cultural influence of Shatner’s character and that of Star Trek overall endures.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Shatner about his upcoming one-man show, “Shatner’s World: We Just Live in It,” in Rolla this Sunday at the Leach Theatre.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

People don’t always understand or are easily able to define the term “white privilege.” Those who do not understand it might also take offense to it. But now there’s a journal to help change that.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke to Tom Schweizer, a retired business executive who created a journal to help guide discussions and promote personal reflection about race and white privilege.

Dan O'Neill is the author of a new book about the history of the St. Louis Blues hockey team.
Reedy Press

The St. Louis Blues are off to a fast start in the 2017-2018 NHL season. The team leads the Central Division after beginning its 51st campaign earlier this month.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, editor Bill Raack discussed the history of the St. Louis Blues hockey team with former St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist and feature writer Dan O’Neill.

St. Louis native Mark Bowden is the author of a new book on the Vietnam War.
Photo of Mark Bowden by John Olson

The premiere of Ken Burns and Lynn Novik’s PBS documentary about the Vietnam War garnered nearly 12 million viewers.

“It was fortuitous for me in a number of ways,” said Mark Bowden, a St. Louis native and author of a new book about the Vietnam War, “Huế 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam.”

“The series has obviously piqued a lot of interest in Vietnam,” he said.

“Huế 1968” focuses on the Tet Offensive, part of which was the Battle of Huế, the bloodiest of the entire war – a 24 day event in which about 10,000 people died.

Flickr

Prior to Thursday’s deadline to submit a bid to Amazon to host its second North American headquarters, it was well known that the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas were planning to submit bids.

What wasn’t widely known is that Missouri submitted its own proposal.

Lenita Newberg (L) and Dr. Barbara Milrod joined host Don Marsh to talk about anxiety in children.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children. That’s according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

“Anxiety is ubiquitous but an anxiety disorder is not,” said Dr. Barbara Milrod, a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and Professor of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

Milrod joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday along with Lenita Newberg, director of the Advanced Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Program at the St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute.

Sidney Watson, the Jane and Bruce Robert Professor at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s difficult to keep track of day-to-day news about what’s happening with the Affordable Care Act.

What do President Donald Trump’s executive actions do? What’s the latest information about efforts in Congress to deal with the ACA?

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the Affordable Care Act with Sidney Watson, the Jane and Bruce Robert Professor at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center.

“It’s certainly a time of chaos and daily confusion,” Watson said.

Amazon's shipping operation, known as a "wish fulfillment center,'' in Edwardsville.
File photo | Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on Thursday, Oct. 19, at 1:15 p.m. with St. Louis's regional bid - St. Louis area leaders are taking a regional approach to attracting Amazon's second North American headquarters. They submitted a bid Thursday, which was the deadline set by the online retailer.  Financial details have not been released. Officials cite a non-disclosure agreement among Amazon, local governments, and states hoping to land the $5 billion investment.

An exhibit on the history of newspapers is now on display at the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
(Courtesy: St. Louis Mercantile Library)

During the mid-1800s, St. Louis had between 20-25 daily newspapers operating concurrently.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about a new exhibit at the St. Louis Mercantile Library, "Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries,” with the library’s director, John Hoover.

“It’s in 11 parts,” Hoover said. “We start in colonial times and even earlier times when newspapers didn’t look like newspapers at all.”

Men outside of Lynch’s slave pen, 1850s. One of these men might be Lynch himself, but there are no known photos of him.
(Courtesy: Missouri History Museum)

Before the Civil War, Bernard Lynch owned the largest slave market in St. Louis. His operation included an office at 104 Locust Street, and a holding pen for slaves at 5th and Myrtle, present-day Broadway and Clark.

After the war, Lynch’s slave pen became a storage building for the Meyer Brothers Drug company, and in 1963, it was demolished to build Busch Stadium II.

Listener Anne Walker wrote to Curious Louis wondering whether any artifacts from the pen remain.

 

Orli Shaham
Christian Steiner / Courtesy of Orli Shaham

Classical pianist Orli Shaham knew that she would likely have a career in music when she was only 11 or 12 years old.

“I knew I needed to be part of that music making,” Shaham said, recalling how she thought after getting the opportunity play with an orchestra at a young age.

Although Shaham has performed frequently with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra as a guest artist, for the final time, she will perform with the SLSO this weekend with her husband, David Robertson, as music director.

Waller McGuire (L) and Kristen Sorth (R) joined host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

By the end of the year, 88 students will begin a program that could result in them earning a high school degree.

The Career Online High School is a partnership between the St. Louis Public Library and St. Louis County Library.

“We are trained to find ways to meet patrons where they are and come up with programs and services to help people in our community,” said Kristen Sorth, director of the St. Louis County Library.

Sorth along with Waller McGuire, executive director of the St. Louis Public Library, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

Sammy Rangel (right), Executive Director of Life After Hate, is receiving the Hero of the Year award from HateBrakers, a local organization founded by Susan Balk (left).
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Life did not start well for Sammy Rangel.

“When I was 45, I found out that I was the second child my mom had tried to kill,” he said.

Rangel is the executive director and co-founder of Life After Hate, a nonprofit organization formed in 2011 by former members of far-right extremist groups in the United States.

On Tuesday, he will receive the fifth annual “Hero of the Year” award from HateBrakers, a locally-based nonprofit organization.

Faisel Khan, Brad Stoner and Maheen Bokhari
Aaron Doerr | St. Louis Public Radio

There was a hubbub earlier this week when St. Louis, which recently lost its crown for having the highest STD rates in the country to Alabama, was found out to be on top once again due to an accounting error.

A Murmuration
Zlatko Ćosić

Video artist Zlatko Ćosić has called St. Louis home since 1997, but it was his experiences growing up and eventually fleeing the former Yugoslavia that have most influenced his work. After the war in his homeland started, he was kicked out of the university and his father lost his job just because of their nationality and religion. They were eventually arrested and placed in forced labor for eight months.

Courtney Berg and Kate T. Parker joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss "Strong is the New Pretty" and girls' empowerment.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air, we turned our discussion to that of girls empowerment with Kate T. Parker, author of “Strong is the New Pretty,” and Courtney Berg, executive director of Girls on the Run, a local non-profit that uses running as a tool for youth development.

"When you have power, you get to know your voice and use it," Berg said of the need to teach girls earlier of their power.

A view of the old North Side YMCA building from the old Sportsman's Park in JeffVanderLou. Mission: St. Louis, a local non-profit, recently moved to the building and has uncovered some unexpected surprises and historic elements.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This story originally aired on St. Louis on the Air on July 26, 2017. It was rebroadcast on Oct. 12, 2017.

If you’ve undertaken any kind of home renovation project, you’ve probably encountered a few, well, we’ll call them pleasant surprises.

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