STLPR Talk Shows | St. Louis Public Radio

STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Anne Bogel (at left) of the “What Should I Read Next” podcast and Holland Saltsman, owner of the Novel Neighbor in Webster Groves, both enjoy connecting good books to the right readers.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to reading, one person’s great book can be another person’s dull tome.

“As devoted readers know, reading is nothing if not personal … my favorite could bore you to tears, your favorite could put me to sleep,” Anne Bogel told host Don Marsh on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Bogel, the person behind the Modern Mrs. Darcy blog and the podcast What Should I Read Next, joined the talk show along with Holland Saltsman, owner of the Novel Neighbor in Webster Groves. Both women offered a variety of suggestions for choosing what to read next as well as some specific book recommendations to listeners.

Longtime executive producer Mary Edwards is retiring Friday after more than four decades with St. Louis Public Radio.
August Jennewein | UMSL

Over the past 44 years, the radio and news industries have gone through many changes. Two things that haven’t changed during that time are Mary Edwards’ dedication and passion for her work at St. Louis Public Radio.

Edwards, who came to the station in 1974 after earning her bachelor’s degree in music from the University of Missouri-St. Louis, was inducted into the St. Louis Media Hall of Fame last year. She started as a music assistant and held positions including music director, program director, production manager and operations manager.

Edwards’ most impactful work at St. Louis Public Radio began on September 3, 1996, with the launch of St. Louis on the Air, the station’s flagship and premier local program. Friday’s show marked her final broadcast as she put in her last day of full-time work and embarked on a well-deserved retirement.

St. Louis circuit attorney Kim Gardner announces on May 30, 2018, that her office will drop a felony computer-tampering charge against Gov. Eric Greitens.
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis prosecutor’s office will no longer accept cases from 28 St. Louis police officers, and is reviewing the testimony they have offered in others.

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner provided no details on why she is excluding the officers. In a statement, she called it her responsibility to defend the integrity of the criminal-justice system.

The latest episode brings the voices of the descendants of J.D. and Ethel Shelley to listeners as they share the story of their family’s place in American history.
The Copeland Collection

There’s no shortage of people who remember the 1948 U.S. Supreme Court decision Shelley v. Kraemer and can talk about how it changed housing practices across the nation – plenty of historians and legal experts, for instance. But when the producers of St. Louis Public Radio’s We Live Here podcast decided to take another look at the pivotal case, they opted for different voices: those of the Shelleys’ descendants.

“There’s a certain kind of human truth that can only really be found by talking with family members who have this story that’s passed down generation to generation,” co-host/producer Tim Lloyd said Thursday on St. Louis on the Air. “It was a great episode for us – we really enjoyed putting it together.”

Veteran Marine Captain Allyn Hinton recalls memories of the Vietnam War and talks about the upcoming reunion of USMC combat helicopter pilots in St. Louis next week.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Vietnam veterans are on the minds of many following the recent passing of Sen. John McCain, and for former Marine Captain Allyn Hinton, this event conjured up some unique memories.

“John McCain was flying A4s off an aircraft carrier doing bombing missions over North Vietnam when he was shot down, captured and a POW for five and a half years,” Hinton recalled on Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air. “His father was the commander of all naval forces in the Pacific, and so he was quite a prize to the North Vietnamese …”

Matt Grawitch (at left), director of strategic research for SLU’s School for Professional Studies, and Dena Bubrick-Tranen, a therapist with Middle Way Counseling and Consulting, offered insights on dealing with difficult work environments.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Ever felt stuck in a problematic job situation? You’re not alone.

The #MeToo movement has led to increased awareness and empowerment around issues of sexual harassment and assault in all sorts of industries. But other forms of mistreatment can crop up in the workplace as well, and employees sometimes feel trapped in difficult environments.

“People do need their jobs, and the more toxic the environment, the harder it can be to leave,” local therapist Dena Bubrick-Tranen said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

From left, Jeremy Segal-Moss, Renee Smith and Tracy Mitchell are all involved with the Big Muddy Blues Festival slated for this weekend.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Blues music runs deep in St. Louis’ roots, and this weekend St. Louisans will celebrate the genre with one of the largest outdoor music events in the region.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the upcoming 2018 Big Muddy Blues Festival with co-coordinator Jeremy Segal-Moss.

From Left, Alyce Herndon and Reona Wise are affiliated with Grace Hill Women’s Business Center, which has a new location at 6722 Page Ave.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The road for small business owners is often a challenging one, especially when there is limited access to information or resources. However, one local organization has a mission to empower women with knowledge to help them succeed.

“Often you have women business owners that endeavor to start a business, [but] they actually do things a little bit out of order,” Alyce Herndon explained on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air. “What I mean by that is they may have a website or an EIN number, but they fail to register their name.”

Several years ago, when Aretha Franklin (at left) was planning her birthday party in New York City, she gave Denise Thimes a call and asked the St. Louisan to sing for her.
Courtesy of Denise Thimes

Denise Thimes was still a young girl when she first interacted with Aretha Franklin in St. Louis during the late ’60s. But even then the Queen of Soul made a big impression on Thimes, who is now an accomplished vocalist herself.

“I emulated her a lot and never had a chance to, as a little girl, sing for her – which is what I wanted to do when she would come to our home,” Thimes told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. “But to have done her birthday party [a few years ago] and to stand there and watch her watch me sing – Don, I had to fight back the tears the whole time.”

Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McKee amassed more than 250 acres in north St. Louis as part of his $8 billion redevelopment plan.

In June the City of St. Louis announced that McKee's Northside Regeneration had defaulted on its agreement with the city after nearly a decade. McKee vehemently denies that.

St. Louis Public Radio examined two specific accountability measures included in those agreements that were ostensibly meant to track maintenance and complaints for McKee’s properties. What the reporting found was that only portions of the requirements were met, and the city did little to ensure that the developer followed through completely.

Developer Paul McKee owns much of the land in this picture, looking north from the intersection of Cass and Jefferson avenues. After nearly 10 years, the city of St. Louis wants to cut ties with McKee and his NorthSide Regeneration initiative.
File Photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

In 2009, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved developer Paul McKee’s $8-billion plan to transform nearly two square miles of north St. Louis. In exchange for $390 million in tax incentives, McKee promised new housing, parks, schools, churches and major employment centers.

Nearly a decade later, with very little work completed, the city tried to cut ties with McKee. But a 2016 agreement, struck with very little public input, could complicate that effort, and has already led to litigation.

Left, Calvin Lai and David Karandish joined host Don Marsh on Monday’s “St. Louis on the Air” to discuss bias in artificial intelligence.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From Siri and Alexa to algorithms on Facebook and beyond, artificial intelligence is becoming more commonplace in our daily routines than ever before. However, a general understanding of its implications is not as widespread.

“Artificial intelligence, you can think of it as software that continues to learn without being explicitly programmed,” David Karandish said on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “With AI you have algorithms that are designed to learn and continue to take on new data in order to make better decisions over time.”

After enduring two cesarean sections and other challenges as a teen mom herself, Ferguson resident Tru Kellman started Jamaa Birth Village in 2015 to provide a community-driven solution to a national health issue.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

“Considerable” is the word that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses to describe the racial disparities that currently surround pregnancy-related mortality rates in the U.S. With African-American women roughly three times more likely to die in childbirth than their white peers, “startling” might be another fitting descriptor.

And the difference “all boils down to systematic racism in varying degrees,” according to Tru Kellman, executive director of Jamaa Birth Village, a nonprofit pregnancy resource center that has served more than 300 women over the past three years.

A new Belleville News-Democrat investigation challenges common perceptions about how safe MetroLink is.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Early Tuesday morning, the Belleville News-Democrat published an in-depth investigation into just how safe the St. Louis region’s MetroLink light-rail system is, ultimately concluding that it “isn’t as dangerous as you think” and that crime rates have declined.

Hours later, a man was shot and killed at the South Grand Boulevard Metro station during an argument between two other people. He was an innocent bystander waiting for a bus.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh led an on-air discussion prompted by this juxtaposition.

From left, Sara McGibany, Nathan Grimm, Susie Harris and Sean Crawford
Mary Edwards | St. Louis Public Radio

During this election season, NPR Illinois, the public radio station in Springfield, is partnering with stations across the state and AARP on a series of forums examining fiscal solutions to the prominent issues in the upcoming Illinois elections and exploring why people are leaving Illinois. The forum in the Metro East area was held Aug. 16 at the Post Commons in Alton.

Ralph Toenjes carries game-used baseballs during an Aug. 16 game from the Cardinals' dugout to the Authentics Shop in the right field concourse of Busch Stadium.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

What happens to all those used baseballs the umpires toss out of games at Busch Stadium?

After Keith Duncan of St. Louis submitted that question to our Curious Louis feature, we went to the Aug. 16 game between the Cardinals and Washington Nationals to find out.

That’s where we found Ralph Toenjes hard at work, happily greeting fans at the Authentics Shop, located behind center field. Toenjes sells memorabilia, including used baseballs, fresh from the field. During games, it’s his job to fetch baseballs from the Cardinals dugout every two or three innings.

Paul Gallant is a local grandfather whose family’s story inspired a book.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The relationships cultivated across generations within a family can be seen as valuable for a number of reasons, and grandparents play a special role in it all.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with one local man whose family’s story was turned into a book. Over the course of three decades, Paul Gallant explored the seven continents, but with some unlikely travel companions: his grandchildren.

The historic battleship USS Missouri was the site of the Japaense surrender during WWII.
USS Missouri Memorial Association

The USS Missouri has played a role in history that is likely equal to its heft. Missouri’s namesake vessel is three football fields long, 20 stories high, 45,000 tons and once housed a crew of 2,400 sailors. The famous battleship was the site of the Japanese surrender during World War II and was a favorite of President Harry Truman, a native Missourian.

“There’s always a lot of renovation,” explained Mike Carr, president and CEO of the USS Missouri Memorial Association, who joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday. “It always takes a lot of effort and money to support 45,000 tons of steel."

From left, Mark Smith, Brenda Talent and Bill Freivogel joined host Don Marsh for this month’s Legal Roundtable discussion.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, the monthly Legal Roundtable convened to discuss current legal news locally and nationally. The recent national court proceedings involving Michael Cohen and Paul Manafort started off the conversation, which evolved from there to touch on topics including the election of Wesley Bell as St. Louis County prosecutor, opioids and district gerrymandering.

The Delmar Loop in 2017
Flickr/TedEngler

Rachelle L’Ecuyer grew up right near the Delmar Loop, so becoming its first-ever executive director earlier this month felt a lot like coming home. Still, she’s been looking at the area with fresh eyes.

“I was walking down Delmar yesterday, and I was taking a picture of the Tivoli sign, and two young men walked up to me and I said, ‘I love it!’” she said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air. “And they looked at me and I said [again], ‘I love it.’ And I pointed from bottom to top, and they said, ‘Oh, I love it: The Tivoli spelled backwards is ‘I love it.’ And we ended up having a pretty long conversation about the Loop.”

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