STLPR Talk Shows | St. Louis Public Radio

STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Brandon Costerison, Kathi Arbini and Jeff Lowe discuss the opioid epidemic in St. Louis.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Recently released numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that more than 60,000 people died in the United States in 2016 due to a drug overdose. The data show nearly two-thirds of those deaths involved a prescription or illicit opioid.

Further, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl are contributing to the sharp rise in opioid-related deaths.

The problem is stark in the St. Louis area.

Smartphone-based GPS tracking systems allow people in the St. Louis area to locate, unlock and ride the scooters recently launched by rival companies Lime and Bird.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

“What is it – people just don’t want to walk anymore?”

That’s how host Don Marsh opened Tuesday’s lighthearted St. Louis on the Air conversation with the Riverfront Times’ Daniel Hill, who joined the show to discuss the many electric scooters that have recently appeared in St. Louis.

Hill, who responded by describing the new scooters from rival companies Lime and Bird as “clearly the future of walking,” recently ran a sizeable sample of the two-wheeled contraptions through “extensive tests,” as described in his investigation.

Dewey Nicks

“When [The Lonely Bull] was Top 10, I got a letter from a lady in Germany who said, ‘Dear Mr. Alpert. Thank you for sending me on this vicarious trip to Tijuana’ … and then I thought, ‘Wow, that music was so visual for her, it transported her … that’s the type of music I wanna make.’” Herb Alpert recalled on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “I wanna make music that takes you some place.”

Colin Wellenkamp (L) and Rick Eberlin (R) joined host Don Marsh to discuss flooding along the Mississippi River.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Remembrances of the Great Flood of ’93 often focus on St. Louis, but many other cities and towns along the Mississippi River faced consequences.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, the mayors of Grafton, Illinois, and Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, joined host Don Marsh to talk about what their communities are doing 25 years after the big event. Their stories represent differences in the way cities have coped with the threat of flooding.

Steve Stenger, who has served as St. Louis County executive since January 2015, hopes to serve another four-year term.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Affton native and incumbent Democratic candidate for St. Louis County executive Steve Stenger has held the position for nearly four years and is looking to serve for another four. His name will appear next to political newcomer Mark Mantovani’s on the Aug. 7 ballot. 

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Stenger joined host Don Marsh and St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies to discuss his campaign to keep his seat as county executive.

St. Louis Public Radio political reporters Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talked about issues in the run-up to the primary election on Tuesday.
Kelly Moffitt and Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Public Radio political reporters Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum in the run-up to the primary election in Missouri on Tuesday.

They discussed a variety of issues in advance of the election including:

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay is seeking to serve a 10th term in the House of Representatives.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay (D-University City) joined host Don Marsh to discuss his campaign to serve another term in Congress. St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum also participated in the conversation.

Clay, who was first elected to national office in 2000, currently faces a primary challenge from Cori Bush to represent Missouri’s 1st Congressional District. Both Bush and Clay’s names will appear on next week’s Democratic primary ballot.

Clay fielded a wide variety of questions from Marsh, Rosenbaum and listeners during the show. Here are 10 of those exchanges.

Democratic candidate for St. Louis County executive Mark Mantovani is looking to replace incumbent Steve Stenger.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Democratic candidate for St. Louis County executive Mark Mantovani is a former businessman turned politician. His name will appear next to incumbent County Executive Steve Stenger’s on the Aug. 7 ballot for Missouri voters.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Mantovani joined host Don Marsh, St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies and listeners to discuss his campaign for county executive.

Florissant resident Cori Bush is an ordained pastor and registered nurse – and is currently running to become a congresswoman.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Cori Bush joined host Don Marsh to discuss her campaign for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum also participated in the conversation.

Bush, who lives in Florissant, is challenging incumbent Rep. Lacy Clay (D-University City) in Missouri’s 1st Congressional District. Both Bush and Clay’s names will appear on next week’s Democratic primary ballot.

Bush fielded a wide variety of questions from Marsh, Rosenbaum and listeners during the show. Here are 10 of those exchanges.

Mow to Own
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Vacant properties are abundant in St. Louis. But one local millennial is on a mission to reduce that number.

“Eltorean [Hawkins] is a young twenty-something who grew up in the Walnut Park neighborhood, and he’s just decided to take it upon himself,” Kameel Stanley said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Lomo Soltado is a Peruvian beef tenderloin stir fry available at Mango Peruvian Cuisine in downtown St. Louis.
Carmen Troesser | Sauce Magazine

“[Peru has] an incredibly diverse cuisine, and not just because of the geography of the region, but also because of the immigrant culture and colonization history that Peru has,” Catherine Klene said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air. “It’s a really excellent mix of flavors and cuisines.”

From Incan staples like corn and ancient grains to varieties of peppers and potatoes, Peruvian food has been also influenced by regions including Europe, Asia and Africa, according to Klene, the digital managing editor at Sauce Magazine.

Left, Bill Freivogel, Blake Strode and Dan Epps participated in the Legal Roundtable discussion on Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt and Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, news broke that two St. Louisans were denied housing in a senior community because of their sexual orientation. Now the case is headed to the U.S. District Court.

Floodwaters climb up the steps in front of the Gateway Arch during the Great Flood of 1993.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

On Aug. 1, 1993, the Mississippi River crested at 49.58 feet in St. Louis, nearly 20 feet above flood stage, breaking previous records. At the flood’s peak, more than a million cubic feet of water passed the Gateway Arch each second.

In west St. Louis County, the entire Chesterfield valley, then known as Gumbo Flats, was under water as the Missouri River overflowed its levees. On the east side of the Mississippi, the entire town of Valmeyer, Illinois, was destroyed, and rather than rebuilding, the citizens moved to a new location.

As a result of the Great Flood of ’93, residents were evacuated, homes and businesses were lost, and people all over the region joined in the sandbagging efforts to prevent further devastation.

Joining Friday’s show via phone, state Sen. Bob Onder (R-Lake Saint Louis), at left, spoke in favor of Proposition A. Jack Cardetti, who was in studio for the conversation, spoke in opposition.
Courtesy of Bob Onder & St. Louis Public Radio

“Do the people of the state of Missouri want to adopt Senate Bill 19 ("Right-to-Work") … ?”

So begins Proposition A, which if passed would make Missouri the 28th right-to-work state in the country, prohibiting labor organizations from mandating union membership or union fees as a condition of employment.

Voters will decide the hotly contested matter during the Aug. 7 primary election. On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh examined both sides of the ballot issue.

President Donald Trump speaks at a Granite City Works warehouse on July 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated July 27 at 2:37 p.m. - STLPR journalist Jason Rosenbaum joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to provide further analysis and a behind-the-scenes look at the president's visit.

Original story from July 26:

President Donald Trump offered up a passionate defense of his trade policy during a visit Thursday to Granite City, and predicted that Friday’s economic numbers will back him up.

“The days of plundering American jobs and wealth, those days are over,’’ Trump said, touching off cheers from an enthusiastic crowd of about 500 invited guests gathered in a warehouse that’s part of a steel mill complex being reopened by US Steel.

Entertainer Jenifer Lewis will be in St. Louis Saturday, July 28, promoting her book "The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir."
Courtesy of Julia Walker

She’s been dubbed the “Mother of Black Hollywood” for playing a number of maternal characters in film and on TV screens for more than two decades. From “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” and “Poetic Justice” to “Cast Away” and more recently “Black-ish,” Jenifer Lewis has made herself a well-known name in American households.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with the St. Louis native about her career highlights that have led to the release of “The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir.”

“I gave my entire heart and soul,” Lewis said about writing the book. “I have never known how to half-ass do anything. I do it with 2,000 percent, now mind you, that could’ve bounced off the bipolar mania, but some parts of that, it worked for me.”

Dail Chambers, Jenna Budreau and Marissa Southards discussed how body image is influenced by social media on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

As social media becomes increasingly pervasive in our society, so does the notion that our bodies are not what they should be. While such platforms are only one factor that influences body image, a study by Common Sense Media found that more than one in four teens on social media stress about how they look when they post a picture online. 

St. Louis-area kidney donor Jane Beckman (center) shared her recent experience giving one of her organs to another person alongside leading nephrologist Krista Lentine (at left) and SSM Saint Louis University Hospital’s transplant coordinator, Cody Wooley
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Back in January of this year, St. Louis-area resident Jane Beckman came across a newspaper article about a man in need of a new kidney – and another man who came to his aid.

“I could do that,” Beckman thought to herself. And soon, she did. At the end of May 2018, she donated her left kidney “to a complete stranger.”

The Cortex MetroLink Station is the 38th station to come to fruition within the light-rail system, which first began service in 1993. The grand opening is set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, July 31.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

MetroLink riders along the central corridor will soon have a new spot to hop aboard both red- and blue-line trains.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what the new Cortex MetroLink Station and other plans in the works could mean for the future of transit in the region.

Joining him to talk about it were Jessica Mefford-Miller, interim executive director of Metro Transit, and June McAllister Fowler, the newly announced board chair for Citizens for Modern Transit.

Cultural Leadership’s 12th class surrounds a vandalized historic marker commemorating Emmett Till in Money, Mississippi, in 2017.
Cultural Leadership

In 1955, Emmett Till, a black teenager from Chicago, was murdered after whistling at a white woman in Mississippi. Though court proceedings took place, no one was convicted of the crime. However, the U.S.

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