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STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Left, Sarah “Bricktator” Arnosky and Brooke “Vicious van Gogo” Clark are the co-captains of Arch Rival Roller Derby.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Ranking fifth out of 400 leagues in the world is St. Louis’ own Arch Rival Roller Derby.

Established in 2005 and now reaching numbers near 100, this league has made a name for itself locally, but the skaters are ready to take that to the next level.

“We compete across the state [and country], and now we get an opportunity to compete internationally,” Brooke “Vicious van Gogo” Clark said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Wash U’s Adia Harvey Wingfield is the 2018 recipient of the American Sociological Association’s Public Understanding of Sociology Award.
Sean Garcia

Race, gender, work and inequality form the core of sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield’s research – and her latest study focuses on the intersection of those topics within the medical field.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, in conversation with St. Louis Public Radio contributor John Larson, the Washington University professor of sociology discussed her recent observations of the experiences of black workers in health care.

Michael Kinch is the author of “Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Human immunity – a field of study at the center of Michael Kinch’s career – is a dense subject. But in his new book “Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity,” Kinch aims to sift through the topic’s complexity and reach lay audiences.

“That was really the goal … there’s a lot of science, a lot of medicine that goes into it, but it’s very approachable,” the author said on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “The way we’re trying to do it is to say, ‘How would you talk about this with your grandmother?’”

Jessica Hentoff and Ari Maayan talked about Circus Harmony's trip to Puerto Rico from which they returned earlier this week.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Lions, tigers and … unicyclists, oh my! Circus performers are known for juggling many acts, but the St. Louis Arches can add humanitarian efforts to their repertoire as well.

The City of Clayton has apologized to the 10 black Washington University students involved in the July 7 incident.
File Photo | Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated July 20 at 4:15 p.m. - STLPR journalists Holly Edgell and Chad Davis joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to provide context and analysis about this story.

Original story from 7/19:

Clayton City Manager Craig Owens, Clayton Police Chief Kevin R. Murphy, and other officials met with several black students who were falsely accused of “dining and dashing” at an IHOP in Clayton.

Owens said the meeting was “emotionally powerful.”

“In hindsight, it is clear to us that we mishandled the interaction with these 10 Washington University students and lacked sensitivity about their everyday reality,” he said in a statement.

NPR political commentator Cokie Roberts is in St. Louis for a presentation at the Missouri History Museum.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

For years, radio and television audiences have listened to and watched Cokie Roberts make sense of the news. Currently, as a political commentator for NPR, her analysis is heard on Morning Edition.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Roberts, who will be presenting Thursday night at the Missouri History Museum at an event that’s also presented in collaboration with the Society of the Sacred Heart. The title of the presentation is "Extending America’s Promise: Pioneering Women with Cokie Roberts."

Hosted by St. Louis Public Radio’s Kameel Stanley and Tim Lloyd, the July 10 “I Live Here” event featured five St. Louisans’ stories include one from Chiffontae.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

In an effort to spur more listener engagement, the “We Live Here” team decided early on to host a community storytelling event. Now in its third year, “I Live Here” features the voices of community members related to a specific topic. Five St. Louisans shared their tales at the latest gathering on July 10.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, “We Live Here” co-host/co-producer Kameel Stanley joined host Don Marsh to talk about the most recent episode of the podcast, which samples a few speakers from the event.

Vice President Mike Pence visited St. Louis on Thursday to tout President Donald Trump's tax cuts and campaign for Senate candidate Josh Hawley, at left. July 19, 2018
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated July 20 at 4 p.m. — Analysis from St. Louis on the Air added.

Updated July 19 at 3 p.m. — U.S. Vice President Mike Pence defended President Donald Trump’s record as “18 months of action, 18 months of results, 18 months of promises kept,’’ as he exhorted St. Louis area supporters to get out to vote in November.

In particular, Pence called for help in defeating U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat who the vice president contended is too liberal for the state — and the country.

UMSL’s Title IX coordinator and chief equity officer, Dana Beteet Daniels (at left), and local attorney Nicole Gorovsky, an advocate for victims of sexual abuse, participated in Wednesday’s discussion.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

While the U.S. Department of Education’s Title IX statute has been around since 1972, there’s renewed societal focus on issues related to sexual assault and discrimination – and evolving guidance at the federal level when it comes to addressing them.

“Colleges are kind of on edge right now with respect to these issues,” Chronicle of Higher Education senior reporter Sarah Brown said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Stephen Werner joined host Don Marsh to discuss the life of Daniel Lord.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Daniel Lord was a prominent American Catholic figure in the 20th century. He attended St. Stanislaus Seminary in Florissant before being ordained in 1923. A priest, writer, editor and speaker, Lord shared his message of faith through a variety of media. He even had his hand in movie and theater production, co-writing the controversial Motion Picture Production Code that studios adhered to from 1930 to 1968.

Left, Adelaide Lancaster, Georgie Herz and Aja La’Starr Owens discussed their efforts of dismantling prejudices starting at an early age through literature.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Studies indicate children are aware of gender stereotypes by age 3 and of many racial stereotypes by 4 or 5. Yet only a portion of the population is having conversations with their kids about these topics. Research also shows that white families are less likely to engage in this dialogue.

Jim DeFelice is the author of "West Like Lightning: The Brief, Legendary Ride of the Pony Express."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The Pony Express is an enduring icon of the American West. It was a venture that used horseback riders to transport mail halfway across the continent from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California.

“This book had to be one of the ones that I had the most fun with,” explained Jim DeFelice, author of “West Like Lightning: The Brief, Legendary Ride of the Pony Express."

DeFelice, who was a guest Tuesday on St. Louis on the Air, said his research included following the old trail, much of which is publicly accessible by car or walking.

R. Marie Griffith is the John C. Danforth Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Washington University.
Randall Kahn

A few weeks after the #MeToo movement first gained traction in October 2017, a related hashtag also began appearing on social media: #ChurchToo. It quickly caught the attention of Marie Griffith, a faculty member at Washington University who was raised Southern Baptist.

For Griffith, who leads the university’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, the idea that sexual harassment and assault occur within Christian faith communities wasn’t new. What was different was the growing spotlight on the problem. In some cases, the outcry led to the resignation of powerful pastors who had abused victims for decades.

Left, Lawerence Archer (Bjorn Johnson) watches as Jacqueline Archer (Rachel Ann) rehearses a piece on the violin during a scene in “Parallel Chords.”
Courtesy of Catherine Dudley-Rose

Shot and produced in St. Louis, “Parallel Chords” is a feature-length drama about the dissonance between two musicians – a father and his daughter.

“It’s loosely autobiographical,” Catherine Dudley-Rose said on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “My father was a classical concert pianist … I did grow up performing with him regularly, and it’s a pretty unique bond when you’re practicing with your father from a young age every single night.” Her father’s recordings of piano parts are used throughout the film.

St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies offered analysis in light of the formal complaint filed by state Rep. Jay Barnes (R-Jefferson City).
File photo | Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh got an update from St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies on the latest news concerning former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Mannies reported Tuesday that state Rep. Jay Barnes (R-Jefferson City) had filed a formal complaint with the Missouri Ethics Commission. It accuses Greitens of intentionally skirting election laws.

Author Joe Johnston has several appearances in Jefferson County this weekend as part of the county's bicentennial celebration.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s well known that people eat different foods in different parts of the United States.

The culture and history of one of those areas – the American South – is explored in a new book by St. Louis native Joe Johnston. He’s the author of “Grits to Glory: How Southern Cookin’ Got So Good.”

Jerod Broadbooks (R), a college student from Wildwood, won a contest to perform with 30 Seconds to Mars.
Carrie Zukoski

By day Jerod Broadbooks is a student-athlete at Lindenwood University. He studies music education and is on the track team. On Monday night, however, Broadbooks, who is also a guitarist, got the chance of a lifetime to perform onstage at Hollywood Casino Amphitheater with the rock band 30 Seconds to Mars.

Broadbooks said the experience started when he heard an advertisement on 105.7 The Point while at his summer job as a lifeguard in Wildwood.

Left, Caryn Dugan and Dr. James Loomis discussed plant-based diets with host Don Marsh on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

While in 2014 just 1 percent of U.S. consumers claimed to be vegan, in 2017, about 6 percent made that claim. With a 600 percent increase in just three years, and veg-friendly options becoming more commonplace in St. Louis, it is safe to say that this diet trend is not just a fad – it’s here to stay.

Justin Fisher’s documentary about the evolving recording industry screens at 4 p.m. Saturday as part of the 2018 St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

A treasure trove of St. Louis-based filmmaking talent will be in the spotlight throughout the next two weekends as Cinema St. Louis’ annual Filmmakers Showcase gets underway on Friday.

One of the locally driven films set to screen Saturday is “Gateway Sound,” which was produced and directed by Justin Fisher, an audio engineer and educator. The documentary explores the state of the recording industry in St. Louis and beyond.

Fisher joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh Wednesday for a conversation about the project and how recording professionals are adapting in an age of music streaming, slumping record sales and easily accessible recording technology.

Tom Murray and Ed Reggi joined host Don Marsh to discuss the opening of “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Opening the curtain on themes such as forbidden love and secret identities, Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” opens Thursday in Grand Center.

This classic farcical comedy set in 1890s London follows the lives of two friends using the same alias, “Ernest,” for their clandestine activities. “At the core of this play, it’s really about who are we in public versus who are we in private,” Ed Reggi said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

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