STLPR Talk Shows | St. Louis Public Radio

STLPR Talk Shows

Content from St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

Percy Green and Cori Bush, two activists of different generations, sat down to talk to each other about what has changed - and what hasn't - in the movement.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis on the Air

Here in St. Louis, we’re well into the second week of protests following the acquittal of Jason Stockley. It’s a scene we’ve seen as recently in 2014, when protests erupted in response to the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr.

Barry Lynn, the outgoing director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State.
Americans United for Separation of Church and State

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Rev. Barry Lynn, the outgoing executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, joined host Don Marsh to discuss where the organization stands today. Lynn has served in the role for 25 years.

Lynn will be in St. Louis this weekend to be honored by local chapters of his organization, the Anti-Defamation League and the National Council of Jewish Women. 

On the set of a documentary shot in Ireland in 2016, featuring SLU professor Thomas Finnan.
HEC-TV

Time has a way of erasing what came before, often pushing lived history underground. A new documentary from HEC-TV that will premiere this fall follows the effort of one Saint Louis University professor and archaeologist as he and his team aim to uncover a specific piece of Irish history: the remnants of Gaelic lordship from the Middle Ages.

Gaelic Ireland refers to the era from around 1200 to 1700, or the late medieval period.

LIndsey Noblott and Lisa Greening joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss a new St. Louis-wide literacy initiative launching this week.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Tomorrow, the first-ever St. Louis city and county-wide literacy initiative launches. The program is a collaboration between Ready Readers and the St. Louis Regional Early Childhood Council and it is called “Turn the Page STL.”

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, we discussed tips and trends of drinking in St. Louis in 2017.
Sauce Magazine

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our partners at Sauce Magazine joined the program to discuss their annual “Guide to Drinking,” and how St. Louisans can get the best of their drinking experience in St. Louis.

Joining the program to discuss:

  • Matt Sorrell, Staff Writer, Sauce Magazine
  • Heather Hughes, Managing Editor, Sauce Magazine
  • Catherine Klene, Managing Editor, Sauce Magazine

Listen to the full conversation:

A wind turbine.
Provided by Ameren Missouri

Missouri's largest utility company announced plans today that could dramatically reduce its impact on the environment. 

Ameren Missouri released multiple goals it hopes to achieve, which include adding 700 megawatts of wind power generation by 2020, along with 100 megawatts of solar power by 2027. Company leaders are speaking to developers about a potential wind farm project and hope to provide more details by the end of this year.

Bill Freivogel, Greg Magarian and Mark Smith joined St. Louis on the Air's Legal Roundtable today.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable reconvened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

This month, we focused on St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson’s decision to find Jason Stockley, who is white, not guilty of murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man.

Sherman Alexie, a Spokane-Coeur d'Alene-American novelist, short story writer, poet, and keynote speaker of BookFest St. Louis joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Sherman Alexie, acclaimed novelist, memoirist, poet and filmmaker, joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday. The author is keynoting the inaugural BookFest St. Louis, which will take place in the Central West End this weekend.

Alexie is also in the midst of promoting his recent memoir, “You Don't Have to Say You Love Me,” which was published earlier this year.

Protesters sit at the intersection of Maryland and Euclid for a moment of silence on Friday night.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Throughout the week, St. Louis on the Air has been hearing from listeners about their thoughts on the Stockley verdict and protests following it. Many have expressed disagreement with the verdict, but we’ve also heard from those who agreed with the verdict or who disagree with protesters’ tactics.

SLSO Music Director David Robertson in an interview with St. Louis Public Radio
Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

The acoustics of Powell Hall. The musicians. The audience.

David Robertson acknowledges that embarking on his final season as music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra is “bittersweet.” Robertson, however, who’s been with the SLSO since 2005, isn’t looking back just yet. He’s focused on the orchestra’s upcoming season, its 138th.

A St. Louis County police officer advances toward protesters blocking Brentwood Blvd. in front of Galleria mall Wednesday evening.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis Public Radio editor Erica Hunzinger to discuss protests and response to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Some of the latest stories our newsroom has produced are:

Protesters faced off with police Friday afternoon just hours after ex-St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley was found not guilty in the 2011 shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

 

Originally published on September 20, 2017. Updated with audio from Don Marsh's discussion with Jeffrey Mittman on "St. Louis on the Air."

This past week, hundreds of people took to the streets to express outrage at a judge’s decision to find former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

The protests largely have been peaceful. But police have made numerous arrests since the demonstrations began. On Sunday alone, police made 123 arrests — largely on a charge of failure to disperse. They also charged a few people with the destruction of property or assault. 

Laura Solsten, 60, of Creve Coeur, prays during a vigil Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, in downtown St. Louis.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman to discuss protests and responses to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Some of the latest stories our newsroom has produced include:

Flickr

Missouri leads the country when it comes to the prevalence of injuries due to falls among older adults. The injuries can cause lost independence and mobility, and result in considerable medical bills.

One in four adults age 65-plus will fall this year. Why this problem is most acute in Missouri is not exactly known.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed risk factors and how to prevent falls.

Joining him for the discussion were:

Author Margaret Atwood will recieve this year's St. Louis Literary Award on Tuesday, September 19.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, iconic author Margaret Atwood joined the program to discuss her career and legacy with contributing host Steve Potter.

Justin Daniels, Tiana Berry-Jones and Ria Van Ryn are three of four St. Louis-based podcasters behind "Mayday: The Handmaid's Tale Podcast."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s been a documented rise in popularity of dystopian novels this past year and “The Handmaid’s Tale” is no exception. As Margaret Atwood makes a visit to St. Louis to accept the St. Louis Literary Award, we speak with three local podcasters who were so inspired by the work that they made a podcast about it and the television show inspired by it this year (which won an Emmy on Sunday).

As the crowd gathered outside the City Justice Center Monday night, protesters shouted "They think it's a game. They think it's a joke."
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, contributing host Steve Potter was joined by St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman to discuss protests and response to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Neuman said Tuesday was declared a "self-care day" by protest organizers, with no planned protests but for an afternoon interfaith prayer service in the works. 

Fred Pestello, president of Saint Louis University, joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss the school's bicentennial and issues facing institutions of higher education.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In November 2018, Saint Louis University, the oldest university west of the Mississippi, will mark its 200th year in higher education. It is the second oldest Jesuit university in the United States. SLU is kicking off celebrations a little bit early, starting this Saturday

White allies of African-Americans upset by a judge's decision to acquit Jason Stockley of murder protested in downtown St. Louis
Brit Hanson | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh checked in with St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman and Reporter Ryan Delaney on protests around St. Louis in response to Friday’s not guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith. Later in the hour, he spoke with two representatives of the Ethical Society of Police, which strongly opposed the verdict.

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

This weekend, Cherokee Street between Gravois and Jefferson will be officially designated as a Hispanic/Latino cultural district known as “La Calle Cherokee.”

The area, known for a proliferation of Latino-owned businesses and street festivals, will be unveiled as such during the annual Fiestas Patrias celebration observing Mexican Independence Day.

Joining St. Louis on the Air to discuss the importance of the designation and the celebration were:

Protesters linked arms on Sept. 15, 2017 in downtown St. Louis on Tucker St.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Programming note: St. Louis on the Air will return at 10 p.m. with a special live check-in with St. Louis Public Radio reporters and editors covering the community's response to the Stockley verdict. You can listen live and follow updates from our Twitter account at @STLonAir.

The audio embedded below is from an earlier version of the program, which aired at 12 p.m.

"A Small Band," Glenn Ligon's work inspired by the Harlem Six and Steve Reich's composition, sits in the Pulitzer Art Foundation's main hall.
Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Fifty-four works. Forty-two artists. A meditation on the colors blue and black. 

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation’s current leading exhibition “Blue Black,” curated by acclaimed Brooklyn-based artist Glenn Ligon, is on display until Oct. 7 and asks the viewer to contemplate identity, power and race.

airpix | Flickr

The words “Alcoholics Anonymous” are synonymous with addiction treatment, but the people behind an alternative therapy hope that those dealing with addiction know there are other forms of treatment out there.

Arthur Shenker, a St. Louis-based facilitator who was at one time addicted to cocaine, and Dr. Joseph Gerstein, the founder and president of SMART Recovery, joined St. Louis on the Air on Thursday to discuss their program’s approach to treating addiction with cognitive behavioral therapy.

Ron Himes, Beverly Foster and Dr. John Morris discussed how Alzheimer's disease impacts African-American patients and families.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

African-Americans over the age of 70 are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white people. While there are no answers, said Dr. John Morris, director of the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University, there are some factors that might be contributing to this gap.

Dogs and cats acting strangely? On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, an animal behaviorist stepped in to answer your questions about animal behavior.
tohu | Flickr

Dr. Debra Horwitz, DVM, a St. Louis-based veterinary behaviorist and veterinarian joined St. Louis on the Air again on Tuesday to share her pet wisdom and answer listeners’ questions about their dogs and cats. 

Here are some of the most pressing questions posed to Horwitz, of Veterinary Behavior Consultations, during the noon hour along with her answers.

Does tone matter when it comes to addressing dogs and cats?

Nine acts were invited by the St. Louis Blues to perform at a game this season.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Blues have invited nine acts to perform the national anthem at a game this upcoming season.

The invitations are the result of a partnership between the Blues and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, an audition process that took place on a recent Saturday at Powell Hall. The Blues and SLSO selected more than one winner after being impressed by the abundance of local talent.

Open to solo singers, groups and instrumentalists, more than 650 contestants sent in video applications. Thirty-four were invited to participate.

Annie Malone, Josephine Baker, King Baggot, Ginger Rogers and Jane Darwell are just a few people with St. Louis and Missouri ties who have made significant contributions to film.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jason Rosenbaum
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum about the ongoing fallout and what might happen after controversial comments made by a Democratic and Republican state legislator.

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal made a Facebook comment wishing for President Donald Trump’s assassination.

State Rep. Warren Love commented that people who damage Confederate statues should be found and hanged from a tree.

Agnes Wilcox and Freeman Word
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on September 8, 2017:

A re-mix of “Then, and Now Again, a Workers’ Opera" will be performed on Sunday, September 10 at 1:00 p.m. at the Missouri History Museum in memory of Agnes Wilcox who passed away on August 28. The production will be directed by Freeman Word and is free and open to the public.

Famed author Salman Rushdie, visiting St. Louis this weekend to discuss his most recent novel, “The Golden House,” says that if you want to be a good writer, “you need to get into a lot of different kinds of rooms.”

He was referencing his knowledge of and imagination with the setting of his latest novel: a secluded garden in New York only accessible by the people whose homes abut the property. 

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