Stockley Verdict | St. Louis Public Radio

Stockley Verdict

On Sept. 15, a judge ruled that former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley was not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith. 

Credit Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Prosecutors alleged Stockley, who is white, executed Smith, a black man, after a car chase and then planted a gun in his car. Stockley maintained that Smith reached for the gun and that he shot Smith in self-defense.

The verdict immediately touched off protests in downtown St. Louis, which spread throughout the city, St. Louis County and St. Charles County in the following days.

Protesters have promised weeks of action and have made demands for changes, including the resignation of the interim St. Louis police chief and bringing in outside investigators to examine police-involved killings.

Already, three lawsuits have been filed against the city of St. Louis over allegations of excessive police use of force and violations of First Amendment rights at protests.

Find all of St. Louis Public Radio's coverage of the Stockley verdict and ongoing protests below:

Kris Kleindienst, co-owner of Left Bank Books, stand next to the ResiSTL display table.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The protests in St. Louis over the last three weeks have topped the news almost daily.

Even for those who stay up on what’s happening, there may be questions about how this came to pass again, just three years after race-related protests in Ferguson.

Delving into St. Louis’ history of racial division and relations between police and black people can seem overwhelming. St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman set out to make a reading list with recommendations from people who are used to being asked.

Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed how protests over the Stockley verdict have evolved.

Earlier this week, St. Louis police arrested 143 demonstrators after Interstate 64 was blocked for a time.

The Rev. Starsky Wilson former co-chair of the Ferguson Commission
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

After the demonstrations that followed a Ferguson police officer’s fatal shooting of Michael Brown in 2014, the 16-member Ferguson Commission came up with a list of recommendations to address policing and the region’s disparities in jobs, education and policing. But many African-Americans say elected leaders have yet to adopt those proposals —and that has helped fuel a new wave of protests.

In the three weeks that followed a judge’s decision to acquit former St. Louis officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith, people have again taken to the streets. The Rev. Starsky Wilson and others say the latest protests — including Tuesday night’s shutdown of Interstate 64 — are acts of social disruption aimed at compelling regional leaders to act.

Police arrested dozens of people on Oct. 3, 2017, after they blocked part of Interstate 64.
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Oct. 4 at 9:55 a.m. with the number of arrests — The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department arrested 143 people protesting Jason Stockley’s acquittal  Tuesday night after they blocked a section of Interstate 64 in St. Louis.

It’s the latest demonstration after a judge found Stockley not guilty of first-degree murder in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, on Sept. 15. Demonstrators aredemanding police officers stop killing black people throughout St. Louis.

Stockley protesters turn their eyes to political action

Oct 2, 2017
Protester Nicole Greer helps Penrose resident Antoine Jones register to vote Oct. 1, 2017 in St. Louis.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

After more than two weeks of protesting the Jason Stockley verdict in the streets, in malls and in business districts, protest organizers implemented a different tactic Sunday. They’re encouraging political engagement as well.

Demonstrators gathered at Wohl Community Center in north St. Louis Sunday afternoon to register voters.

State Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. told a crowd of a few hundred people that the protests won’t end, but it’s time to put a new tool in place.

Demonstrators march through the St. Louis Galleria on Saturday evening as they continue protests against the acquittal of Jason Stockley and police violence against black people. Sept. 30, 2017
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A week after St. Louis County police arrested 22 people following a peaceful demonstration at the Galleria mall, protesters returned to the shopping center in a short and tightly executed display of resistance they vowed to continue.

Dozens of protesters went to the mall at about 6 p.m. to let police, business leaders and others know that they would not be deterred in their fight to end police violence against black people. They gained a diverse group of followers inside the mall before heading to the intersection of Brentwood Boulevard and Galleria Parkway.

“If people are a little uncomfortable, cool. If people are stuck in traffic, cool. If they’re mad because they can’t buy something, cool,” Democratic state Rep. Bruce Franks said. “We’re going to keep affecting the economy. We’re going to keep disrupting.”

Rasheen Aldridge, activist and democratic committeeman for the 5th Ward, wipes his eyes after police officers sprayed chemicals at protesters near Busch Stadium. Sept. 29, 2017
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A three-hour protest late Friday in downtown St. Louis ended in a tense confrontation between police and demonstrators.

People in the crowd of protesters said police used chemical agents on some protesters and shot one person with a Taser. Police confirmed they made at least two arrests.

The turmoil followed a night of peaceful demonstrations that took protesters from Kiener Plaza to Busch Stadium, where they chanted at police behind barricades. The protesters demanded that police stop using deadly force on black people.

Protesters and small business owners march to City Hall to attend a Board of Alderman meeting a hold a press conference on Sept. 29, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Alderman Joe Vaccaro on Friday asked his Board of Aldermen colleagues to honor the city’s police officers, one week after they did the same for a black man killed by a white former police officer in 2011.

Vaccaro, D-23rd Ward, introduced a resolution that thanks the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department for working long hours to protect citizens and businesses during two weeks of protests since the Sept. 15 acquittal of Jason Stockley.

File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went “Behind the Headlines” with updates from the second week of protests in response to the Jason Stockley acquittal.

Reporter Willis Ryder Arnold and Executive Editor Shula Neuman, from the St. Louis Public Radio newsroom, joined the program to help bring us up to speed.

Protesters stood silently with hands raised in the middle of Market Street near St. Louis City Hall.
File photo | Brit Hanson | St. Louis Public Radio

A simple concept underpins the American legal system: equal treatment.

But the ideal more often is missed than met — at least that’s what protesters argue during the near-daily demonstrations since the Sept. 15 acquittal of a white former St. Louis police officer in the 2011 shooting death of a black man.

The recent events once again have some local attorneys trying to square their faith in a system they’re supposed to respect despite its flaws.

Michelle Higgins clarifies protesters' main demand – "stop killing us" – at the People's Town Hall at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown St. Louis. Sept. 28, 2017
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 9:25 p.m. with details from protest — Activists put forth an updated list of demands Thursday, including that new St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson resign. But Thomas Harvey, the head of ArchCity Defenders, told St. Louis Public Radio that the main thing protesters want is simple: “Stop killing us.”

Later in the evening, a group of protesters returned to Washington Avenue, close to where mass arrests were made on Sept. 17, sparking three lawsuits against the city. After protesters surrounded a police car for a few minutes, yelling at the officers inside, a line of police in riot gear showed up. The group eventually moved on, and the protest ended after about two hours, with no arrests.

St. Louis Police face off with protesters on September 15, 2017, the day a judge acquitted Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Police departments are standing by their officers’ response to protesters after days of civil disobedience throughout the St. Louis region.

Although three lawsuits have been filed against the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, officials are confident the majority of their officers complied with the department's use-of-force policy, which establishes guidelines, though one area law professor argues those guidelines are up for interpretation.

State police block protesters from continuing down Brentwood Blvd. toward Interstate 64 on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017 during a march in Richmond Heights.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

In the weeks since a judge found former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith, protesters have taken to the streets nearly every night.

While most of the people involved acted peacefully, in several incidents police have arrested demonstrators, and in some cases used tactics that are coming under scrutiny for their legality.

As a result, the city of St. Louis and the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department are the targets of several lawsuits.

Percy Green and Cori Bush, two activists of different generations, sat down to talk to each other about what has changed - and what hasn't - in the movement.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis on the Air

Here in St. Louis, we’re well into the second week of protests following the acquittal of Jason Stockley. It’s a scene we’ve seen as recently in 2014, when protests erupted in response to the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr.

September 22, 2017 photo. Some Oktoberfest revelers in St. Charles' Frontier Park weren't happy to see protesters in a Sept. 22 demonstration.
Ryan Delaney| St. Louis Public Radio

People protesting daily against what they see as systemic police violence against African-Americans aren’t the only St. Louis-area residents who say they want to be heard.

Many white residents don’t support the protests. They can’t understand why demonstrators are pinning their protests to the not-guilty verdict for Jason Stockley, a white, former St. Louis police officer who shot and killed Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man, in 2011. Smith was 24.

Police dressed in riot gear gathered on Tucker Boulevard on Sept. 15, the day Jason Stockley was acquitted of first-degree murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

 

Updated Sept. 27 with response from St. Louis officials — The City of St. Louis has asked the federal government to help with an independent investigation into two lawsuits and several complaints stemming from police response to protests that followed the acquittal of Jason Stockley, Mayor Lyda Krewson and interim Police Chief Larry O’Toole said Wednesday.

In a statement, the two said the investigation would focus on police conduct during the protests since the Sept. 15 decision, the dozen “grievances” filed with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department’s Internal Affairs Division and the two federal lawsuits.

A protester stands in front of a line of St. Louis Police officers on Sept. 15, 2017.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As the days of demonstrations over Jason Stockley’s acquittal go on, protesters in St. Louis are outlining the policy changes they say will help create a more equitable justice system and police department.

The main demands involve giving St. Louis and St. Louis County police additional training, equipment and oversight — things that were proposed after a Ferguson officer shot Michael Brown in 2014 but never enacted. That’s because most bills required changes to state law, and the GOP-controlled General Assembly didn’t go for it.

University City resident Kristine Hendrix speaks at a meeting of the St. Louis County Council. Sept. 26, 2017
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Some members of the St. Louis County Council want an outside agency to investigate how police handled protests on Saturday at the Saint Louis Galleria.

That was the conclusion after hearing the concerns of nearly 30 speakers at Tuesday’s council meeting in Clayton. It comes as protests continued on Tuesday over Jason Stockley’s acquittal of first-degree murder charges in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

Protesters marched through downtown St. Louis silently on Monday night. They wore blue tape over their mouths to represent "blue silence." Sept 25, 2017
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Protesters introduced a new demand Monday night: that St. Louis’ interim police chief step down immediately.

Their call for Interim Chief Larry O’Toole to leave the department’s head post comes more than a week into daily protests against a judge’s decision to acquit former officer Jason Stockley, who is white, in the 2011 fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man.

Marjorie Theodore on Monday gives her account of the police response to protests at the St. Louis Galleria, where er son was among 22 arrested on Saturday. (Sept. 25, 2017)
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Marjorie Theodore and her son were among protesters at the St. Louis Galleria on Saturday.

She said the protest was just wrapping up and they were celebrating with chants and clapping when she said she heard something garbled. Within seconds Theodore said a whistle blew and police moved in on the protesters. Her 33-year-old son was among the first arrested.

“Clearly the police took a peaceful situation and committed violence on it,” she said. “That would be called a police riot and the violence continued and continued.”

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