StoryCorps

StoryCorps

StoryCorps St. Louis brings you a conversation with Eddie Foxx, 18, and his foster grandfather Clyde Trucks, 56.

Foxx wound up in foster care at the age of 12 after his biological father was arrested several times for DUI (driving under the influence), leaving his family without the means to support Eddie. He spent the next few years in the foster care system, until Trucks' daughter adopted him in to their "forever family."  

StoryCorps, the nonprofit project which works to collect oral stories from everyday Americans, is beckoning people to “listen to their elders” this Thanksgiving weekend and record a story through their new mobile app. The project is called “The Great Thanksgiving Listen.”

StoryCorps: Listen to your elders this Thanksgiving

Nov 20, 2015
StoryCorps

StoryCorps, the oral history project program that makes you laugh or cry every Friday during Morning Edition, has an assignment for you this Thanksgiving.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen is your chance to record stories from your grandparents, great aunts and uncles, or any important elder in your life. 

StoryCorps

In honor of Veterans Day, StoryCorps St. Louis brings you a conversation with friends Sherry Echohawk Taluc and Molly Tovar. Taluc is Native American. She joined the Army in 1971. Many members of her family also served the United States, including her grandfather, who was an American Indian “code talker,” soldiers who used their native language to communicate encrypted information. Tovar spoke with Taluc about her Army experience along with her family’s service heritage.

This photograph was published by the Kansas City Star. Jamell Spann, center, at a protest following the Aug. 9, 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown. Elizabeth Vega, right, and several of his friends try to comfort him.
Photo by Robert Cohen of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, distributed by the Associated Press and then published online by the Kansas City Star.

Following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Aug. 9, 2014, the world watched the aftermath of the shooting and the subsequent demonstrations and police actions through news coverage, including many stirring photographs. 

One of those photos was taken by St. Louis Post Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen. It was part of a portfolio of work that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. The picture shows  a young man, body tensed in anguish, his face in a scream of sorrow, anger, frustration and fear. He is surrounded by other young people and one adult woman, her face grimaced with sadness, her hand on his shoulder in an attempt to comfort him. 

(Courtesy: Missouri History Museum)

Today’s edition of StoryCorps, which aired during “Morning Edition,” was a remembrance of Max Starkloff, a pioneer in the disability rights movement who was quadriplegic. He died in 2010.

The StoryCorps conversation featured Starkloff’s wife, Colleen Starkloff, and their daughter, Meaghan Starkloff Breitenstein.

For David Isay, who founded StoryCorps more than 10 years ago, the project isn’t about telling stories. It’s about listening.

“I think that what listening is about is remembering that it’s really not about you,” Isay said. “Just be present with another person, and concentrate and listen to them with respect. Any of us are capable of it.”

(Courtesy: The Grannie Annie)

Public radio listeners are familiar with weekly Friday segments from StoryCorps in which family members and close friends talk with one another, sharing memorable stories.

And as we head into the holiday season and families begin to gather, we’re reminded of opportunities to take full advantage of documenting and preserving family histories and stories.