stroke

DePaul Health Center

Women are both more likely to suffer a stroke, and less likely to be treated in a timely manner when they experience one. May is Stroke Awareness Month, and today on St. Louis on the Air Dr. Amer Alshekhlee of the SSM Neurosciences Institute outlined five risk factors that increase the likelihood a woman will have a stroke.

(via Wikimedia Commons/Blausen Medical)

Research led by Washington University confirms that medication and lifestyle changes are safer and more effective at preventing certain strokes than surgery.

Most strokes are caused by a reduction in blood flow to the brain ― usually from a blocked artery in the heart or neck. In about a tenth of cases, a narrowed brain artery is to blame.

Jin-Moo Lee, Washington University

A new study out today from Washington University suggests that Toyota’s process for maximizing efficiency in manufacturing cars can also help hospitals improve their care of stroke patients.

Study lead Washington University stroke neurologist Jin-Moo Lee says with input from doctors, lab technicians, and other hospital staff, Barnes-Jewish Hospital was able to eliminate inefficiencies and cut the average time it took evaluate and treat stroke patients from an hour down to 37 minutes.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Missouri is fourth-worst in the nation for strokes

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show the number of adults suffering a stroke in Missouri has jumped in the last six years.

(via YouTube/SenatorKirk)

U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk has issued his first public remarks since suffering a stroke.

In a video released Tuesday, Kirk says he can't wait to get back to work and is walking again. The 52-year-old senator suffered a major stroke in January and underwent emergency surgery. He entered a rehabilitation center in February and was discharged last week.

Here's that video statement:

For patients with heart failure, but normal heart rhythm, aspirin may be just as good as a heavy duty blood-thinner.

That’s the finding of a new study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Washington University chief of cardiology Douglas Mann was on the study’s steering committee.

Senator Mark Kirk (R-Illinois).
(via Wikimedia Commons/United States Senate)

Mark Kirk's doctor says he is pleased with the Illinois senator's progress in recovering from a stroke in January.

Dr. Richard Harvey said Friday that Kirk continues to improve his "mobility for day-to-day activities." He adds that Kirk has been meeting regularly with his staff and has been getting visits from close friends and family.

Harvey is the medical director of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago's Center for Stroke Rehabilitation.

(Sean Powers/WILL)

Doctors say Illinois Sen. Mark Kirk has been upgraded to good condition and is continuing to improve after a major stroke.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital neurosurgeon Richard Fessler says Kirk is visiting with family and watched the Super Bowl.

In a Monday statement, Fessler says Kirk will be able to start rehabilitation soon.

The 52-year-old Republican was in good health when he was stricken last month.

Illinois Sen. Mark Kirk is continuing to improve after a major stroke and has been upgraded to fair condition.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital neurosurgeon Richard Fessler says Kirk is alert, talking and responding well to questions.

The Chicago hospital released a statement Monday about Kirk's progress, a little more than a week after he suffered a stroke that's affected his left side.

A new analysis suggests racial and ethnic minorities are not getting equal treatment when it comes to strokes.

At the request of the American Heart Association, a group of stroke experts led by Saint Louis University neurologist Dr. Salvador Cruz-Flores examined the scientific literature for racial and ethnic disparities in stroke care.