Sunshine law

Tony Rothert and Mary Bruntrager on February 25, 2015 after oral arguments on the World Series ticket case
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated with response from Jennifer Joyce.

The Missouri Court of Appeals has ordered the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department to release some of the internal documents of an investigation into the misuse of 2006 World Series tickets.

Tony Rothert and Mary Bruntrager on February 25, 2015 after oral arguments on the World Series ticket case
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Once again, the Missouri Court of Appeals finds itself considering whether or not records generated as part of an internal police probe should be made public.

The question this time: Whether public employees like police officers can claim their right to privacy is being violated by the release of records that a court has said are subject to the Missouri sunshine law.

stl police license
Rachel Heidenry

Can public employees keep records private after a judge has ruled they should be released under Missouri's sunshine law?

That is the question that a panel of the Missouri Court of Appeals will consider Wednesday in a session at the Washington University School of Law.

Logos of the St. Louis County and St. Louis Metropolitan Police.
St. Louis County website / file photo

Footage from police body cameras would be exempt from Missouri’s open records law if a bill moving through the Missouri Senate becomes law.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Ferguson did not use a bidding process to select the company it wanted to handle its open records requests, according to documents obtained by St. Louis Public Radio. Ferguson also apparently made no attempt to negotiate the for-profit company’s fees, which could total thousands of dollars for public records.

Acumen Consulting, a St. Louis-based company, is charging journalists a base fee of $500 a request and then a $135 an hour fee on top – all to search through emails for keywords.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio has filed a formal complaint against the city of Ferguson for violating Missouri’s open records law by attempting to charge unreasonable amounts for public documents. Ferguson wants more than $2,000 before handing over the public records requested.

On Sept. 23, I wrote to Ferguson officials, asking for certain records – most of them emails. State law is explicit that these records requests have to be answered within three business days.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

A second St. Louis judge has ruled that police officers have no right to expect that statements they make during internal investigations won’t be released to the public.

Bill Greenblatt/UPI

Sunday was the start of "Sunshine Week," a time to celebrate the idea of open government and open records. But in Missouri, you might want to hold off on popping the champagne.

Missouri's sunshine law, which allows the public to ask government officials for things like emails, documents and other records, doesn't have much teeth.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

A long-running legal battle over whether records of  internal St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department investigations are subject to Missouri's Sunshine Law will continue for possibly another six months.

Here's a timeline of the case:

gurney
(via Wikimedia Commons/Noahudlis)

Governor Jay Nixon said Missouri will be moving forward with two executions later this year, in spite of objections from the American Civil Liberties Union and the European Union.

The executions could have a very real impact on hospitals throughout the United States, as the European Union considers possible export limits of the drug as part of its anti-capital punishment policies. Most propofol comes from Europe, where its leading manufacturer only wants it used for medical purposes.

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