tax amnesty

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation designed to aid some delinquent taxpayers in Missouri is on its way to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk.

The House on Thursday overwhelmingly passed HB 384, the "tax amnesty" bill, which would allow people behind on their state income taxes to pay them off without additional penalties or interest.

(Associated Press Data/compiled by Kelsey Proud/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri General Assembly has passed and sent next year’s state budget to Governor Jay Nixon (D).

The $24 billion spending plan passed both chambers with little difficulty, but not without some complaints.  State Senator Jim Lembke (R, Lemay) was not happy with language restoring a health care program for blind Missourians.  He says he’ll file a constitutional objection.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

 The Missouri House of Representatives today gave both first-round approval AND passage to several pieces of notable legislation, after suspending its rules to allow for both to take place in the same day:

  • Local control of the St. Louis Police Department endorsed

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would end the state's oversight of the St. Louis police department.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updating you on a story about the first vote yesterday, the Missouri House has, with their second vote today, approved legislation to allow for a tax amnesty period.

Delinquent Missouri taxpayers would get a chance to pay off their debts without owing penalties or interest under the legislation.

(via Flickr/JD Hancock)

Missouri House members have endorsed legislation to offer amnesty to delinquent taxpayers.

The measure would waive interest and penalties for those who pay their tax bills between Aug. 1 and Oct. 31. Supporters estimate the measure could bring in as much as $74 million to the state. Plus, they say it would give individuals and companies an opportunity to wipe their slate clean.

The legislation gained first-round approval Wednesday and needs another vote before moving to the Senate.

via Flickr/alancleaver_2000

Reporting from Illinois Public Radio's Luke Runyon also used in this report.

A plan to collect money from Illinois tax deadbeats produced more than expected.

Gov. Pat Quinn's office said Monday that offering delinquent taxpayers a chance to pay up without punishment brought in $314 million. It was originally expected to produce about $250 million.

Experts believe much of that overdue tax money would have been collected eventually. The amnesty program simply brought it in faster.

Bill Greenblatt/UPI

Missouri lawmakers are considering two different options for enticing people to pay overdue taxes.

A tax amnesty proposal presented Thursday to a House committee by Republican Rep. Tom Flanigan, of Carthage, would waive all interest and penalties for delinquent taxpayers who pay up between Aug. 1 and Oct. 31.

  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that business groups are happy about Missouri Governor Jay Nixon's proposal to grant partial tax amnesty to those who owe back taxes. Nixon wants the state to waive half the interest and 100 percent of the penalties on delinquent taxes for those who pay during a designated amnesty period.