Tax Breaks | St. Louis Public Radio

Tax Breaks

Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri is doing a poor job of tracking the economic impact of tax breaks, according to an audit released on Wednesday.

Missouri state Auditor Nicole Galloway said state government has no idea if incentives, exemptions, and newer tax laws changes are working as intended. She said the state isn’t accurately measuring how much revenue it’s losing.

Stones used by the St. Louis Curling Club during matches at the Creve Coeur Ice Arena. Each could weigh as much as 44 pounds.
St. Louis Curling Club

The first stand-alone curling facility in Missouri could be operating by the end of the year. Members of the St. Louis Curling Club have made an offer on property at the St. Louis Mills outlet mall. They are also having preliminary discussions with the city of Hazelwood about a possible tax abatement.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

It wasn't that long ago that Republican leaders in the Missouri House and Senate were deeply divided and nearly at each other's throats over tax credits.

In 2011, an entire special legislative session was devoted to approving a wide-ranging tax credit bill that centered around incentives designed to transform Lambert-St. Louis International Airport into an international cargo hub. But differing opinions over the role of tax breaks and concerns that they were getting out of hand sabotaged the special session, and there have been no major attempts since then to give the system a makeover.

Enter Gov. Eric Greitens in 2017.

Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio
Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Jay Nixon's preparation for the annual veto session included telling reporters Wednesday why several of the vetoed bills should remain dead.

He spent time discussing bills that have gotten less publicity, which includes HB 1870. It contains language that would allow some businesses to ignore the federal E-Verify program if using it would "result in a substantial difficulty or expense.

Gov. Jay Nixon defends several vetoes in anticipation of the legislature's attempts to override them. at state fair, aug 18 2016
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Jay Nixon is speaking out against plans by lawmakers to override several vetoes he made earlier this year.

He told reporters Thursday at the Missouri State Fair that tax breaks sought by GOP leaders could deprive the state of much-needed revenue.

Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio

It was a busy day for Gov. Jay Nixon, as his final year in office heads toward the halfway point.

He told reporters Tuesday that he signed seven more bills into law while vetoing eight others. Several of those approved and shot down are composed of tax breaks.

He specifically singled out three bills for criticism Tuesday: SB 641, HB 2030, and SB 1025.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The St. Louis Election Board has certified a proposed St. Louis charter amendment to bar tax breaks for Peabody Energy or any other firm involved in “unsustainable energy production.”

(via Flickr/ChrisEaves.com)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has signed legislation that extends the life span of a popular economic development tool in the state.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would expand tax breaks for auto parts manufacturers.

Ford and General Motors already have access to the incentives.  State Rep. Chuck Gatschenberger (R, Lake St. Louis), the bill’s sponsor, says it would expand the benefit to smaller auto parts builders.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Legislation that's aimed at helping poor Illinois families keep more of what they earn is now law.

Gov. Pat Quinn on Tuesday signed the legislation that expands the state's earned-income tax credit. It's now 5 percent of the federal credit, would climb to 7.5 percent next year and 10 percent the year after.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has approved legislation designed to keep key companies from leaving the state.

The Democrat's office announced Friday that Quinn signed tax-break legislation directed at Sears and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

He did not take action on companion legislation that would provide tax relief for individuals and his office did not immediately say when he would.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Will be updated.

Illinois lawmakers have approved a $330 million package of tax relief to businesses and individuals.

The state Senate approved the business measure 44-9 on Tuesday. The individual tax relief passed 48-4. Both now go to Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, a supporter.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Will be updated. For the latest updates on this story, follow Illinois Public Radio reporter @AmandaVinicky on Twitter.

Updated 2:58 p.m. with input of Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn.

Updated 2:29 p.m. - replaces story on passage of bill for working poor with version encompassing passage of both bills.

The Illinois House has approved tax breaks for businesses, including some big names that are threatening to leave the state.