tax credits

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri’s special legislative session may, in effect, be over, following Monday's actions in the Missouri Senate.

First, the Senate rejected the House version of a wide-ranging tax credit bill, voting to send it back to the House and urging passage of the Senate version.  Then Senate leaders chose not to vote on a presidential primary bill, following a failed attempt to swap it out with an alternate version that would have replaced the primary with county-level caucuses.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The full Missouri Senate is set to convene next week, October 17th, to make one last attempt at reaching an agreement on a wide-ranging economic development bill.

The biggest sticking point remains whether to place 7-year expiration dates, or sunsets, on low income and historic preservation tax credits.  The Missouri House removed the sunsets before passing the bill last week, a move opposed by the Senate.

President Pro-tem Rob Mayer (R, Dexter) says he’ll ask the Senate to vote to appoint conferees, who would meet with House leaders and try to hammer out a final version of the bill.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Updated 5:14 p.m.

The Missouri House has passed its version of a wide-ranging tax credit bill.

It does not place expiration dates, or sunsets, on historic preservation and low income housing tax credits, as demanded by the Senate.  Instead, House GOP leaders hope to mollify the Senate with a new proposal:  All tax credit programs would come up for review every four years and be subject to a renewal vote by the General Assembly.  The measure is sponsored by House Budget Chairman Ryan Silvey (R, Kansas City).

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri House leaders have confirmed they’re returning to Jefferson City next week to resume the special legislative session -- but their return doesn’t mean that there’s been any breakthrough on an economic development deal.

The special session ground to a halt last week because House and Senate leaders could not agree on whether to place expiration dates, or sunsets, on historic preservation and low-income housing tax credits, or on how much oversight Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) Economic Development department should have over some incentives.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Lawmakers have left Jefferson City and are not scheduled to return, even though the special session is still officially underway.  House and Senate leaders are still at odds over a wide-ranging tax credit bill.

The only legislative action so far this week was Monday’s technical session in the Missouri Senate, in which two Senators gaveled the chamber in, took no action, then gaveled out about a minute later.  The House is scheduled to hold a similarly brief session on Thursday.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The special legislative session in Missouri did not come to an end today, despite warnings from House and Senate leaders that they would go home if an agreement on a wide-ranging tax credit bill wasn’t reached by today's adjournments.

Instead, both chambers will hold technical sessions, where just a handful of lawmakers gavel in for a few minutes and then adjourn.  Senate President Pro-tem Rob Mayer (R, Dexter) says his chamber will only meet in technical sessions until an agreement is reached on tax credits, or until time runs out in early November, whichever comes first.

(via Flickr/The Cleveland Kid)

The city of St. Louis once again plans to use tax credits to keep the headquarters of a major company in downtown.

Legislation that will be introduced at the Board of Aldermen on Friday gives Ralcorp $20 million in tax credits to upgrade and expand its headquarters at 8th and Market.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 6:29 p.m.

A Missouri House committee has dealt what could be a fatal blow to the passage of the wide-ranging tax credit bill that lawmakers have been battling over throughout the special legislative session.

The House Economic Development Committee adjourned for the day without taking it up for a vote, which means the full House cannot vote on it Friday unless it suspends the rules.  Chairwoman Anne Zerr (R, St. Charles) says the bill is just not ready to be voted on, as House and Senate negotiators are nowhere near an agreement.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The special legislative session called by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) could end as soon as Friday without any legislation being passed.

House and Senate leaders continue to butt heads over what should and should not be included in the wide-ranging tax credit bill, and that includes the compromise version that House leaders announced that they’ve reached with the governor.  Senate President Pro-tem Rob Mayer (R, Dexter) says the chances of reaching a compromise by Friday look very slim.

Missouri House leaders have announced "a compromise proposal" on the tax credit bill that's become stalled during the ongoing special legislative session.

In a press release issued today, State Representatives John Diehl (R, Town and Country) and Anne Zerr (R, St. Charles) said that they had worked with Governor Jay Nixon (D) on crafting an alternate proposal.  However, the press release contains no details on what's in it.  Zerr says she cannot disclose what's in the compromise because it's still being worked on.