teacher tenure

File photo

Early voting. Teacher Tenure. Sex Crime Trial Rules. Gubernatorial Budgetary Power.

Those are some of the topics before Missouri voters on Nov. 4.

“St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Public Radio reporters Marshall Griffin and Tim Lloyd about the proposed constitutional amendments.

Here’s a recap of Amendments 2, 3 and 6.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri voters have four constitutional amendments on the November ballot. The amendments cover a wide array of issues, ranging from early voting to the admissibility of prior sex crimes, teacher tenure and the governor's power over the state budget.

Amendment 2

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

In November, voters in Missouri will decide whether to change the way teachers are evaluated and retained by school districts.

Under Amendment 3, teachers would be dismissed, retained, demoted, promoted and paid primarily using student data. It also would put a three-year limit on teacher contracts and prevent teachers from organizing or collectively bargaining on the design of teacher evaluations or how they’re used.  

St. Louis Public Radio File Photo

Even though a campaign to institute tougher evaluation and tenure rules for Missouri teachers is stopping its efforts, opponents of a constitutional amendment on the November ballot say they’re going ahead with their efforts to defeat it.

“We’re going to be campaigning full steam ahead,” Mike Sherman, spokesman for the group Protect Our Local Schools, said in an interview Wednesday. “We still need everyone in the state to vote no.”

comedy nose | Flickr

(Updated 10:55 a.m., Tues., Aug. 5, with certification for the ballot)

As Missourians prepared to vote on a variety of issues at the August primary Tuesday, the secretary of state's office announced that a constitutional amendment changing how teachers are evaluated will be on the November ballot.

Secretary of State Jason Kander said petitions submitted in May by the organization known as Teach Great have been certified and the issue will appear on the Nov. 4 general election ballot as Amendment 3.

St. Louis Public Schools

A group seeking to revamp teacher-hiring in Missouri, including the elimination of tenure, turned in more than 275,000 signatures Sunday to get its proposal on the November statewide ballot.

Called “Teach Great,” the group’s initiative-petition effort has largely been financed by financier Rex Sinquefield.

Among other things, the ballot proposal seeks to base teacher retention on performance-based evaluations and "quantifiable student performance data." It also would end the use of tenure and seniority in determining teacher retention or layoffs.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

As soon as the snow melts, Missourians may find themselves confronting a horde of people stopping them outside stores, on the streets or at their front doors.

The object: to get their signatures on petitions that would put a variety of issues – such as early voting, income taxes and teacher tenure – on the August or November ballot.

(UPI file photo, Bill Greenblatt)

Financier Rex Sinquefield, Missouri’s largest political donor, has given $750,000 to jumpstart the initiative petition drive for a ballot measure to end teacher tenure.

According to the Missouri Ethics Commission, the money was donated on Christmas Eve to “Teachgreat.org,” the campaign committee set up to oversee the effort.