Technology | St. Louis Public Radio

Technology

Virtual reality is here to stay.St. Louis on the Air discussed the technology trend on Monday's program. Host Don Marsh tried a VR headset on firsthand.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

From the outskirts of Shanghai to the Wisconsin Dells, companies are creating entire arenas for the worlds of virtual reality. St. Louis is no different with a score of virtual reality (VR) companies cropping up to capitalize on the futuristic technology trend that allows you to experience another world through a headset and gaming technology.

Dan Chace | Flickr

Rumors of an executive order about cybersecurity from President Donald Trump have been swirling for the last week, and improving our national cybersecurity has been a political issue for the last couple of years.

On a personal level, hacking, data collection and recording by personal devices all pose threats to personal information security.

ARS screen in a helicopter
Provided by Churchill Navigation

The Missouri State Highway Patrol is using new technology that can be described as Google Maps on steroids. It helps pilots search for missing persons and better track possible suspects.

Sister Marysia Weber  discussed the psychological impacts of the internet and technology on children and adults alike.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

August 23rd marked the 25th anniversary of the launch of the World Wide Web. Much has changed in that time, including how much of the day humans spend with screens, the internet and technology.

Sister  Marysia Weber, the director of the Office of Consecrated Life with the Archdiocese of St. Louis and clinical instructor in the Department of Psychiatry with Washington University, said that she’s seen a big difference in patients with behaviors that she did not anticipate.

Provided by Baranidharan Raman/Washington University in St. Louis

Imagine a day when law enforcement could rely on a tiny tool to scope out bombs hidden underground in potentially dangerous places.

That day could come soon, if scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have success with tapping the potential of locusts. Relying on locusts' keen sense of smell, researchers are building devices that use the insects' olfactory system to improve homeland security.

North Tech senior Charles Wyatt helps remove the red bumper off his team's robot after competing Friday, April 29, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 2:30 p.m. May 1 with information of fourth school — Four local high schools scored well enough in district and regional robotics competitions to participate in the FIRST robotics championship held in St. Louis this weekend: North Technical, University City, Ladue Horton Watkins and Westminster Christian Academy.

North Tech, a high school in Florissant that’s part of St. Louis County’s Special School District, is in its rookie year and competed with just three members.

A portrait of St. Louis, by drone

Mar 24, 2016
Musem-goers view  Andrea Stanislav's "Convergence Infinité" at the St. Louis Art Museum
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Have you ever wondered what St. Louis looks from the perspective of a hawk or eagle?

The St. Louis Art Museum will offer you a chance to find out, starting this weekend. Artist Andrea Stansislav’s new exhibit "Convergence Infinité" focuses on video captured by flying a drone equipped with a camera over the city.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This past June, 33 Veterans Court Technology Clinic students and supporters watched as seven of their colleagues took part in the clinic’s first formal graduation ceremony. The clinic is part of a special drug court in St. Louis that provides an alternative to incarceration for veterans. It provides job skills for participants in the program.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/14392295267/in/photolist-nVNgXR-c7jAtm-fxPfLi-fXrr1c-nYKqui-hu3AXE-gx93Fp-brrrRT-eJtM1J-iKcF6H-ykxNun-rJcTW2-bBCwDK-o6i8H9-q7rUDB-y3xDQe-oouEuF-cpWKK1-byPx8H-c5b9eN-pFbVwn-cDqdQW-dexsfb-yTiBwq-aDdhzD-6vBKZZ-cTKi8W-
Thomas Hawk, Flickr, Creative Commons | http://bit.ly/1kZL9nS

One of the most charming parts of St. Louis is the vast swath of unique neighborhoods scattered across the metropolitan area. This quality makes for some lovely day-explorations for people who’ve lived here forever and want to discover something new—but it is also one of the most difficult parts of moving here for the first time. Now, there’s an app for that.

St. Louis educator Julie Smith joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh to talk about her new book on media literacy.
Alex Heuer

Earlier this week President Barack Obama announced his decision to change the name of North America’s tallest peak from Mt. McKinley to Denali, the native Alaskan name.

Vicki Sauter holds her book, "You're Never Too Old to Surf."
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Recent data collected by the Pew Research Center shows that while the proportion of Internet-using senior citizens is increasing, older Americans lag far behind their younger counterparts in adopting technology that seems inextricably tied to modern life.

Teen-curated exhibit examines miscommunication in technology

Jul 30, 2015
CAM Teen Museum Studies participants plan the final stages of thier exhibit
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Your cell phone. Skype. Email. Imagine each device as an impediment to communication, not an aid. That’s the idea behind Cole Lu’s exhibit SMELLS LIKE CONTENT at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

“Most people use text messages and that’s one of those things where you don’t get a voice intonation and you don’t read body language,” said one of the show’s curators, 18-year-old Scout Sale.

World Wide Technology acquires Asynchrony

Jun 5, 2015

St. Louis-based World Wide Technology has acquired local software company Asynchrony.

WWT is a systems integrator that has 3,500 employees and had nearly $7 billion in revenue last year. Asynchrony, which is based in downtown St. Louis, has about 250 employees and will do about $40 million in revenue this year.

WWT Chief Financial Officer Tom Strunk says over the last five years his company has been investing to help simplify customers’ technology infrastructure.

Telemedicine is changing the health care industry

May 12, 2015
(Via Flickr/Rosemary)

In recent years, advancing technology has changed the way we go about our daily lives. From reading books on tablet devices to video chatting with a friend from afar, technology has ushered in new eras in our way of life.

But, how is technology shaping the world of health care? Health care experts joined “St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh to discuss how telemedicine- virtual patient-doctor interaction- is changing the industry.

How to build a child's heart … with a 3-D printer

Mar 10, 2015
A model of the heart of a patient with complex congenital heart disease, created at St. Louis University.
Dr. Wilson King

The development of 3-D printers, which use computer designs to create solid objects, are revolutionizing the way engineers make prototypes, models and even some consumer goods. The practical applications for the health-care industry are huge — and they’re starting to happen in St. Louis.

teacher with two young children
U.S. Department of Education

Wednesday on “St. Louis on the Air,” we learned about a St. Louis Science Center program that helps teens learn science, technology, engineering and math skills. Ahead of that segment, we asked listeners about memorable STEM experiments, classes and learning moments. Here’s what they told us. (Responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

St. Louis Science Center
St. Louis Science Center

Like most kids, Diamond Williams toyed with several potential careers. Cosmetology had potential. So did following in the footsteps of her father, a dialysis technician, but her squeamishness cut short those dreams. Instead, Williams is now an engineer, a career path she discovered through a St. Louis Science Center youth program.

Youth Exploring Science works with St. Louis teens to create projects centered around science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.

Ferguson activist Ebony Williams (left) has been a regular at area protests calling for police reform. She says she wants to learn coding and other tech skills to bring them back to the community. Danie Banks (right) of Thoughtworks is her mentor for the
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

For the next six weeks, 10 young people, many with ties to Ferguson demonstrations, will spend three days a week learning web coding, business technology and how to protect themselves from cyber-attacks.

Activist group Hands Up United organized the program through the help of Abby Bobé with the IT consulting firm ThoughtWorks. Other ThoughtWorks employees also are involved.

Bobé said the goal of the six-week workshop is to give more people of color in the St. Louis area an opportunity to learn about technology.

Washington University's Lihong Wang led the research team that invented a camera that can take up to 100 billion frames per second. Their work made the cover of the Dec. 4, 2014, issue of the journal Nature, where this image appeared.
Lihong Wang | Washington University

What if we could design a camera that could take a hundred billion pictures in a second ― enough to record the fastest phenomena in the universe.

Sounds like science fiction, right?

But it’s not: a new ultrafast imaging system developed at Washington University can do just that.

St. Louis Employers Seeking STEM Talent

Oct 8, 2014

Last month’s State of St. Louis Workforce report examined St. Louis’ economy and labor market, and the local demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics talent.

Pages