term limits

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Term limits were approved by Missouri voters back in 1992 and took full effect after 2002. A new study finds that those changes have not had much of an impact on the demographic makeup of the General Assembly. St. Louis Public Radio's State Capitol reporter Marshall Griffin spoke with the author of the report, Dr. David Valentine with the University of Missouri's Institute of Public Policy.

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Term limits have been in effect in Missouri’s General Assembly for 20 years.

Tomorrow a public conference held in St. Louis will explore how the limits have changed Missouri politics for both good and bad.

Representative Chris Kelly, a Democrat from Columbia, served in the state house for 12 years before voters passed the term limits and two terms since then.

Kelly says the General Assembly still attracts smart, hard-working people, but he says they don’t have as much time to learn the ropes.

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Term limits are a controversial topic in Missouri and there are persuasive cases both for and against them.  Currently, the Missouri constitution limits state senators to two four-year terms and state representatives to four two-year terms.

Host Don Marsh’s guests are:

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A new measure passed in the Missouri Senate would limit statewide officials to eight years in office.

Missouri currently limits the governor and treasurer to two four year terms each. Members of the state House and Senate are also subject to term limits.

A proposed constitutional amendment would extend the two-term limits to the lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general and auditor.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri voters could get to decide whether to impose term limits on all executive officeholders under a proposal endorsed by the state Senate.

The proposed constitutional amendment would limit the lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general and auditor to serving two, four-year terms. A similar limit already is in place for Missouri's governor and treasurer. State lawmakers also are subject to term limits.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

All statewide officeholders in Missouri would be limited to eight years in office, under legislation pre-filed in the State Senate.

The Governor and State Treasurer are the only statewide office holders in Missouri limited to two four-year terms.  The rest – Lt. GovernorAttorney GeneralSecretary of State and State Auditor – can run for re-election as often as they want.  The measure is sponsored by State Senator Brad Lager (R, Savannah), who is also running for Lt. Governor.

(Official Photo via Office of the Lt. Governor)

Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder says the House should not pass legislation that would allow changes to the state's term limits for lawmakers.

Lawmakers currently are allowed to serve about eight years in the House and eight years in the Senate. A proposed constitutional amendment passed by the Senate last month would allow lawmakers to serve 16 years total, with all that time either spent in one chamber or split among the two.

(Missouri Senate Website)

The Missouri Senate has passed a proposed constitutional amendment that would alter term limits for state lawmakers.

Currently, House and Senate members can serve no more than eight years in their respective chambers, although they can switch chambers and serve another eight years across the Rotunda.

Bill Greenblatt / UPI

Missouri lawmakers have been pre-filing bills this week in preparation for the legislative session that begins next month. Here's the lowdown on these early ventures: