Thelonious Monk

William Gottleib / Copyright William Gottleib

Jazz Unlimited for May 3 is “The Career of Pee Wee Russell.”  Clarinetist Pee Wee Russell was born in Maplewood Missouri in 1906.  All of his life, he was a contrarian who went his own way.  Even though he was a very original voice, Pee Wee was very shy and people laughed at him because he looked like a clown.  Whitney Balliet remarked that, “even his feet look sad.”  During his career, Balliet noted that he worked with the wrong musicians most of his life and during the last seven or eight years worked with musicians he should have been working with his entire life.  He also became a very

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Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, March 1 will be “Remembering Clark Terry.”  One of our national treasures, St. Louis trumpeter and jazz educator Clark Terry died February 21 at the age of 94.  We will hear approximately 28 minutes of his voice, telling stories about his life.  The music will include Clark with Count Basie, Oscar Peterson, Benny Carter, Duke Ellington, his own Big B-A-D Band, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, the Gerry Mulligan Concert Jazz Band, St. Louisan Chris Woods, Abbey Lincoln, Tubby Hayes, J.J. Johnson and Lee Konitz.

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, December 14 will be “The Career of Coleman Hawkins: the Father of the Tenor Saxophone."  Coleman Hawkins was the first to recognize the beauty and utility of the tenor saxophone.  Before he came along, it was a novelty instrument.  Since his first recording in 1921, Hawkins has paved the way for a lot of tenor players and influenced many.  He is known as the “father of the tenor saxophone.” We will listen to his 47-year career that includes music with Fletcher Henderson, St.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

The September 12 Jazz Unlimited show will present “The Music of Thelonious Monk.”  By his early teens, Thelonious Monk was a promising classical pianist.  However, he left this music for jazz because of the freedom of expression it brought him.  This show will present his idiosyncratic piano playing along with 22 of his compositions, all of which are played today by many musicians.  He will be heard with big bands, piano trios and his own quartet.  His music will also be played and sung by others such as the Monk’s Music Trio, The Pocket Brass Band, Danilo Perez, Carmen McRae, Abbey Lincoln

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for March 2, 2014 will be “Live Jazz from Other New York Venues, Part 1.”  Jazz played live is a different animal from jazz recorded in the emotionally sterile confines of a studio.  The energy and emotion reflected back from an audience to the performers brings about better performances.  We continue our survey of New York venues with smaller clubs and Lincoln Center as well as presenting music from clubs that we did not have time for on earlier shows.  We will feature duets between Dick Wellstood and Kenny Davern, Dick Hyman and Roger Kellaway and Joe Lovano and Hank Jones

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for February 23 will be “The Guitar of Jim Hall, A Tribute to Rich McDonnell and New Music.” Jim Hall will be featured on the first hour, the “Keys and Strings Hour,” bringing you the quieter side of jazz.  Rich McDonnell, founder of the Max Jazz label died recently and we will honor him with some of recordings from the Max Jazz catalog.  The third hour will be new music for February.  Artists heard on the show will be: the Jim Hall trio, the Red Mitchell quintet, duos between Jim Hall and Pat Metheny, Bill Evans and Ron Carter and the Hampton Hawes quartet.  Music in the sec

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, December 1st will be “Live Jazz from Town Hall, New York City.”  We continue playing live music from the jazz capital of the world with concerts from Town Hall that span the years 1944 to 1990.  The artists featured are Eddie Condon and His All-Stars, Louis Armstrong and the All-Stars, the Dizzy Gillespie-Charlie Parker Quintet, four pieces from a Baron Timmie Rosenkranz concert in 1945, which includes the classic “I Got Rhythm” duet of Don Byas and Slam Stewart, Mary Lou Williams’ “Zodiac Suite,” Benny Carter, Red Norvo and Teddy Wilson, Thelonious Monk, the Chic

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited Sunday, November 10  will be “Live Jazz From Carnegie Hall-Part 1.”  While Carnegie Hall opened in 1881, jazz was not heard there until 1938, when Benny Goodman had the first jazz concert.  Since then many jazz concerts have been held there and some were recorded.  In the years since 1938, Carnegie Hall has hosted three of John Hammond’s “Spiritual to Swing” concerts with Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Charlie Christian, Big Joe Turner and Lester Young; Jazz at the Philharmonic concerts with Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Flip Phillips and Oscar P

Dennis C. Ows;ey / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited on Sunday evening, September 15 will feature “John Coltrane in His Own Words and Music.”   During his career, John Coltrane gave only a few interviews to jazz journalists.  He was a quiet, humble man who was very guarded.  Until now, only transcripts existed of these interviews.  Two well-known interviews with August Blume (1958) and Frank Kofsky (1966) have recently been issued in audio form.  These interviews, along with a short 1960 audio interview from Stockholm and a short 1966 interview from Japan will provide a different look at this jazz giant.  In addition, we will p

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited Sunday evening, July 14 will have “Music from the Newport and Monterey Jazz Festivals-Part One”   The Newport and Monterey Jazz Festivals are the longest running jazz festivals in history.  Newport was founded in 1954 and Monterey in 1957.  Newport was wracked by riots in 1960, 1970 and 1974, was canceled for a time and moved to New York City for a time in the 1970’s.  The riots were caused by drunken young people who were attracted to the festivals when they added popular rock groups to boost attendance.  Monterey has run uninterrupted for 55 years with its make-up of mainly

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Due to music recording copyright laws, the music from this show is no longer available. Music is posted for two weeks after a show airs.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

On Sunday, November 4, Jazz Unlimited will present part 4 of our series on frequently recorded jazz originals.  The time period of the recordings spans 80 years  from 1926 to 2006.  Some of the music includes Benny Moten's "South," the Original Dixieland Jazz Band's "Tiger Rag," Duke Ellington's "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart," Billy Strayhorn's "Chelsea Bridge," Nat Adderley's "Work Song," and Miles Davis's "Milestones."  Photos of some of the artists heard on this show can be found on the accompanying slide show.  Some of the other artists heard on the show will be Horace Tapscott, Thel

The Left Coast over the years has been the host to many great jazz clubs.  The October 21 show presents jazz recorded in clubs in San Francisco, Oakland, Santa Cruz and Seattle.  Some of the clubs are The Jazz Workshop, Yoshi's, Keystone Corner and the Blackhawk in the San Francisco Bay area and Jazz Alley and The Penthouse in Seattle.  We feature such musicians as the Ray Brown Trio, the Yerba Buena Jazz Band, Shelly Manne, Cannonball Adderley, Thelonious Monk, Henry Threadgill, John Coltrane and Pharoah Sanders.