Tim Jones

Gov. Jay Nixon is calling a special session to pay for the Missouri National Guard and Missouri Highway Patrol's operations in Ferguson and the St. Louis region.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Gov. Jay Nixon plans to call a special session of the Missouri General Assembly to pay for the Missouri National Guard and Missouri Highway Patrol’s operations in Ferguson and the St. Louis region. 

It’s a move that comes amid immense disapproval of how the governor handled the aftermath of a grand jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson Police officer Darren Wilson for shooting and killing Michael Brown.

Outgoing Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones announced Wednesday that he has formed the House Oversight Committee on Public Officials and Government Accountability “to conduct a thorough investigation of the numerous alleged improprieties and political shakedowns as outlined in a recent extensive investigatory piece in The New York Times.”

Tim Bommel, Missouri House Communications

Tim Jones is done … at least for now.

The soon-to-be departing speaker of the Missouri House announced Thursday that he won't be seeking election to any statewide office in 2016. 

It was widely speculated that the long-time Republican lawmaker would run for attorney general, or possibly secretary of state, as he had expressed interest in both jobs at various times. But in a letter to his supporters, he says that he wants to spend more time with his family.  Here's an excerpt:

(via Flickr/evmaiden)

Depending on whose opinion you get, this week’s initial meetings to draw up new school standards for Missouri students were a “Common Core cheerleading session” or a strong-arm attempt that was “hijacked by political extremists” on the right.

Either way, the eight committees impaneled under a law passed earlier this year appear to have a long way to go to meet a deadline of having the new standards ready for approval a year from now.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri General Assembly’s veto-override session, which gets underway next Wednesday, once again is touching on familiar ground: abortion, guns, schools and state spending.

State House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, is particularly optimistic that legislators will override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of a bill to extend the waiting period for an abortion to 72 hours, making Missouri only the third state in the country to do so.

But overshadowing all of that – and possibly upsetting predictions – is Ferguson.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Outgoing Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones is encouraging St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch to reconsider and step down as head of the investigation into the Ferguson police shooting that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Jones, R-Eureka, is the first Republican to call for McCulloch’s removal. 

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers are sounding off on proposed Environmental Protection Agency rules aimed at reducing carbon emissions.  

The proposed rules effectively provide individual states with options to reduce carbon emissions by 2030. These options include making facilities more energy efficient, investing in alternative energy sources like solar and wind power, or joining other states in “cap and trade” programs.

Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House and Senate each spent the waning minutes of the legislative session embroiled in debate over a bill to nullify most federal gun laws.

But afterward, it was Gov. Jay Nixon who fired off the first post-session shots. His target was the General Assembly’s final-day spending spree.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

This week, the Politically Speaking podcast team – Chris McDaniel, Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies – host state House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, who is completing his final legislative session.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes.

Rosenbaum joined Jones in Jefferson City, while McDaniel and Mannies were in St. Louis.

Jones offered his assessment of the session’s final days, leading up to Friday’s adjournment.

Among his observations:

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House acted quickly Tuesday to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a tax-cut bill that is estimated to cut the state's revenue by about $620 million a year when fully implemented.

The House obtained the exact number of votes needed — 109 — with the help of one Democrat, Rep. Keith English of Florissant.  He joined all of the chamber's 108 Republicans.

The House joined the Senate, which voted 23-8 on Monday to override the governor's veto, which he issued last week.

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