Tim Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Tim Jones

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s plan called for a meeting this week with legislators to discuss Medicaid expansion as part of an apparent focus on health care as the General Assembly prepares to go back into session in six weeks.

The meeting now appears dead, the casualty of a dispute between the governor and two legislative committees over who would control the proceedings.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has issued an executive order directing the Missouri Department of Revenue (DOR) to accept jointly filed state income tax returns from same-sex married couples living in the Show-Me State.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri House’s two top Democrats have sent a joint letter to Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, to say that they no longer have any questions regarding his soon-to-be defunct LLC, the Missouri Freedom Alliance.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: More than 600 people packed the auditorium Tuesday night at Maryville University to hear Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones and others lay out, in general, their opposition to Obamacare and their frustration that the federal health insurance law has yet to be killed.

“The effort to defund Obamacare will continue,” Jones said at an event billed as an Obamacare Townhall. It was co-hosted by Americans for Prosperity, a fiscally conservative group, and local radio station 97.1 FM Talk.

House Speaker Tim Jones
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With the legislative veto session over, Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones is hoping to put to rest another controversy he admits was largely self-inflicted.

To that end, he said he literally is putting all of his cards on the table.

(Official Portrait, Missouri Attorney General's office)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is siding with fellow Democrat, Governor Jay Nixon, in opposition to legislation that would challenge the federal government's ability to enforce federal gun laws in Show-Me State.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

 

via Kristi Luther and Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications.

The income tax bill that would eventually reduce income tax rates by about a half of a percent is likely to not be brought up in veto session next month, according to Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones (R-Eureka).

Appearing on St. Louis Public Radio's and the St. Louis Beacon's Politically Speaking podcast, Jones said he currently doesn't have the votes necessary for an override of the governor's veto.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Missouri's top House official has dropped an attempt to subpoena members of Gov. Jay Nixon's administration to testify before a committee he created.

House Speaker Tim Jones had subpoenaed five current Nixon staffers and his former Revenue Department director to testify about changes that were made in Missouri's procedures for issuing driver's licenses.

The six people all declined to appear as directed by the subpoenas last month, and a Cole County judge temporarily blocked the subpoenas from being enforced.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones on Thursday formally announced the creation of two interim committees that will look at ways to reform the state's Medicaid system.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Governor Jay Nixon has launched a major public effort to support his veto last week of a bill that would have cut Missouri's individual and corporate income taxes.

The Democratic Governor appeared before college and university officials Tuesday morning in Jefferson City, telling them that the GOP-backed proposal is the single greatest threat to public education he's seen in his career.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Governor Jay Nixon (D) strongly denied allegations Monday that his administration had a role in the language of a bill that would inadvertently cause a sales tax hike on prescription drugs in Missouri.

Last week, Nixon sent out a press release condemning an income tax bill passed by Republicans that would have accidentally caused a sales tax increase due to an accidental bracket.

Tim Jones converses with supporters of Medicaid expansion.
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones contends that Gov. Jay Nixon’s latest objection to the tax-cut measure sitting on his desk is “a red herring” that the governor is using to make his expected veto more palatable.

Jones, R-Eureka, was referring to the discovery by Nixon and his staff that the tax-cut bill, HB253, would eliminate the state’s longstanding sales tax exemption on prescription drugs.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

In a new report Wednesday, Missouri received a lackluster grade on its infrastructure. Citing “pressing issues,” the American Society of Civil Engineers graded Missouri as a C- overall.

Missouri’s Speaker of the House, Republican Tim Jones of Eureka, said it proves several goals of the just-ended legislative session were worth focusing on.

Missouri House Communications

A Missouri lawmaker who threatened to resign unless one or both of his key bills survived the last day of the 2013 legislative session is staying put, even though both bills failed to make it out by Friday's deadline.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a move years in the making, the Missouri House has sent to Gov. Jay Nixon a bill to revamp the state’s workers compensation system and repair Missouri’s financially troubled Second Injury Fund.

The House voted 135-23 this morning to pass SB1, which House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, called “one of the crowning successes of this legislative session,” although he acknowledged that the bill wasn’t perfect.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) has formed a committee he says will thoroughly investigate the Department of Revenue's scanning of source documents for driver's license and conceal carry applicants, and the release of the state's conceal carry weapons (CCW) holder list to the federal government.

Jones says the committee is necessary because the Nixon administration has not fully cooperated with lawmakers' efforts to get answers to everything that's happened and why.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has formally rejected the Senate version of the state budget, setting the stage for final negotiations over the state’s spending plan for next year.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Republican supermajority in the Missouri House inched up this week with the election of Republican Mike Moon of Lawrence County to the vacant House District 157 seat from southwestern Missouri.  Moon defeated Democrat and former House Member Charlie "Doc" Dake in what Republican Speaker Tim Jones described as a hotly-contested race.

(via Flickr/hjl)

Missouri Secretary of State  Jason Kander is urging House Speaker Tim Jones to take up early voting initiatives.

Kander wrote a letter today in response to an interview Jones gave earlier this month in which Jones questioned the importance of early voting.

Kander asked Jones to assign a Republican early voting bill to a committee, saying the issue has had bipartisan support over the years.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House will begin debate Tuesday on the 13 bills that make up next year’s state budget.

The three bills that encompass the state’s Medicaid program don’t include Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) proposed expansion, although House Democrats may try to offer amendments to change that.  Budget chairman Rick Stream (R, Kirkwood) says the state should have more of a say in how Medicaid dollars are handled.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, is calling on state Attorney General Chris Koster to appeal last week’s court ruling that blocks provisions of a new state law that allows employers to exclude contraception, abortion or sterilization from insurance coverage.

Jones said in a statement Wednesday that Koster, a Democrat, must “immediately appeal this case and defend the rights of Missouri citizens by challenging the contraception mandate as unconstitutional. Missourians need to be protected from mandates that violate their religious beliefs.”

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Republican leaders in the Missouri House are promising to fast track legislation that would forbid the state from scanning and storing documents of residents who apply for conceal-carry endorsements.

Some GOP lawmakers have accused the state agency of forwarding copies of conceal-carry applications and other documents to the federal Homeland Security department.  House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) says he’s disturbed by the allegations.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

House Democrats are sponsoring legislation to expand Medicaid in Missouri, despite the fact that the state budget filed by Republicans leaves out the proposed expansion.

House Bill 627 would expand Medicaid to an additional 300,000 Missourians, and House Democrats say not passing it would cost the state 5,000 jobs and could force some rural hospitals to close their doors.  Kerry Noble is CEO of Pemiscot Memorial Health Systems in the Missouri Boot-heal.

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Governor Jay Nixon, on Monday night, delivered the first State of the State Address of his second term.

He discussed a broad range of topics which included education, Medicaid, mental health and domestic violence.  An in-depth breakdown of his speech as well as reaction from House Speaker Tim Jones is available here.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

 

Updated at 5:45 a.m. to include feature story on the Governor's State of the State Address by Marshall Griffin.

Governor Jay Nixon (D) pitched a $25.7 billion budget to the state of Missouri during Monday’s State of the State Address.  It includes spending increases for K-12 schools, Higher Education, and the proposed Medicaid expansion he’s been calling for since late November.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at the Governor’s speech and his proposed spending plan for next year:

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House members are proposing a statewide bond issue they say could launch a building boom across the Show-Me State.

House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) has created a special committee to examine several bonding proposals that could fund new buildings, repairs and upgrades on state property and college campuses.  The effort is bipartisan, as the Republican speaker has appointed Democrat Chris Kelly of Columbia to chair the committee.  Kelly says the proposal can be done without raising taxes, unless transportation needs are included.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Lawmakers have returned to Jefferson City and begun the new year’s regular Missouri legislative session. 

So, what do they want to get done?

Senate Republicans are focused on:

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A panel appointed by the Missouri House to study the state’s transportation needs released its final report today, one day before the start of the 2013 legislative session.

It states that Missouri needs an additional $600 million to $1 billion a year – for several years – to maintain roads, bridges, and other transportation infrastructure.  The report lays out several options for meeting that gap, but doesn’t recommend any specific funding methods.  Retired Democratic State Senator Bill McKenna co-chaired the Blue Ribbon Citizens Committee on Missouri's Transportation Needs.  He says some of the options won’t appeal to the Republican majority.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers return to Jefferson City this week for the start of the 2013 regular session.  So far it appears that this year’s dominating issue will be the expansion of Medicaid, which Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has called for and which Republican leaders in both chambers say won’t happen.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at that looming battle and other issues facing Missouri lawmakers this year.

Medicaid Expansion

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