Todd Swanstrom

Professors Robin Hambleton (L) and Todd Swanstrom (R) joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh on April 22, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

What happened in Ferguson following the shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing protests has garnered worldwide attention.

Robin Hambleton works at developing innovative polices and leadership in cities throughout the world. He’s a professor at the University of West England in Bristol and the author of a new book, “Leading the Inclusive City: Place Based Innovation for a Bounded Planet.”

(Flickr, Paul Sableman)

Closing economic disparities in the St. Louis region is one key to moving past Ferguson.

That was the message at a panel discussion Thursday called "Eight Months Post-Ferguson: The Journey from Recovery to Rebuilding." Several of the panelists said sharp economic contrasts contributed to issues in Ferguson, but are even more stark in other communities.

Jeniece Andrews, left, prays with a woman who pulled over her car to embrace her by the rubble of her business, Hidden Treasures. Andrews sank her life savings into her store, which was burned down after a grand jury decided not to indict former Ferguson
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Jeniece Andrews invested her life savings — and her family’s money — into an upscale boutique in Ferguson called Hidden Treasures. Attached to a Little Caesar’s restaurant, the store sold jewelry, clothing and accessories to a diverse clientele throughout Ferguson.

Chuck Wexler, the executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, is leading a study for Better Together about how the region's policing agencies should be structured.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

When Better Together formed last year, it was already planning to examine how the region polices itself — especially because St. Louis County has so many different departments that patrol towns and cities.

But the review became more than just a theoretical exercise after the shooting death of Michael Brown. The roughly 60 police departments throughout St. Louis County underwent intense scrutiny for aggressive ticketing, little racial diversity and the targeting of African Americans. There have been widespread calls for substantial changes.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Chesterfield received plenty of attention recently when it snagged two high-profile festivals away from the city of St. Louis. But the hubbub over the Taste of St. Louis and Bluesweek’s exodus may be part of a larger story. 

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Monday, March 3, 2014 to include audio from St. Louis on the Air.

Former U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar remembers a time when his home city was described by travel writers as “Indianapolis No Place.” 

When the Indiana Republican became mayor of Indianapolis in the 1960s, the city was mired in a “mediocre, flat situation.” He said it received “very little interest to anybody outside who was not involved parochially.”