Tom Schweich

Conservatives Rally At CPAC St. Louis

Sep 28, 2013
via Flickr/Gage Skidmore

Thousands of conservatives attended CPAC St. Louis on Saturday to listen to more than 40 conservative leaders and rising stars. There were a number of last-minute speaking cancellations for the conference. Members of the US House had to stay in DC to work on a fix to avoid a partial government shutdown.

Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri also cancelled, saying he was working on a deal even though the Senate wasn’t in session. That decision drew the ire of many conservatives.

comedy_nose / Flickr

Updated 1:20 p.m.

The Missouri state auditor gave the St. Louis Public Schools a “fair” rating in an audit of the district released Wednesday.

Auditor Tom Schweich, a Republican, said the district was not initially cooperative with his office.

Superintendent Kelvin Adams, who also attended Wednesday’s press conference, said the audit got off to a “rocky” start because the district did not initially believe Schweich had the authority to do the performance audit.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

Following a critical state audit of the Rockwood School District back in February, Missouri Auditor Tim Schweich said Wednesday that the district has made tremendous progress.  His previous audit found the district overpaid a construction company $1.2 million, which is one of   the few issues still unresolved. Schweich recommended a variety of reforms for Rockwood, from fuel usage and inventory policies to program management services. 

(Courtesy Hawker Beechcraft)

A state audit released today sharply criticizes the Missouri State Highway Patrol (MSHP) for spending $5.6 million on a new airplane.

According to the audit, the state of Missouri operated 23 aircraft prior to the purchase of the King Air 250.  State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) says that included five passenger airplanes. 

"There were 113 days in which none of the five existing planes flew, and there were no days in which all five of them flew," Schweich said.  "So that leads to the question about why do you need to spend $5.6 million on a new plane?"

State Auditor's office

The management of an early childhood fund by the Missouri Department of Social Services (DSS) has received a "poor" rating in a state audit released Monday.

State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) said the Early Childhood Development, Education and Care Fund provided more than $170,000 to three child care facilities that failed to open or expand their facilities as planned.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

A new audit of the Missouri state House and Senate knocks both chambers for their failure to comply with portions of the state Sunshine law.

Steakpinball | Flickr

The Missouri state auditor released a report Wednesday on the state’s Public Defender system.

Among the findings: public defenders need to better track the hours they spend on each case and update the standards they use to determine what’s the appropriate caseload.

Auditor Tom Schweich says Public Defenders have relied on national standards that are out-of-date.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

A state audit released today says that the Missouri Department of Economic Development (DED) could have done a better job of screening applicants for tax credits for the failed Mamtek project in Moberly.

Two years ago the small northeast Missouri town issued $39 million in bonds to get the company to build an artificial sweetener plant.  Mamtek later missed a bond payment and construction halted, and Moberly’s bond rating was downgraded as a result.  State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) said the due diligence procedures used by the DED were woefully inadequate.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:37 p.m. with additional reporting.

Missouri State Auditor Tom Schweich released an audit of Governor Jay Nixon on Wednesday accusing Nixon of overspending his appropriation by $1.7 million and thumbing his nose at the budget appropriation process.

Mo. State Auditor's office

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich (R) has released a letter he sent this week to Governor Jay Nixon (D) expressing concerns over his administration’s handling of a contract for a St. Louis County license fee office.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Supreme Court has rejected a challenge to the authority of the state auditor to write financial summaries for ballot initiatives.

(Mo. Atty. General's Office)

Will be updated.

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich is questioning the process for awarding contracts to private attorneys representing the state in lawsuits.

The attorney general's office can award contingency fee contracts by requesting bids or asking the state Office of Administration to request bids and establish an independent panel to choose the winner.

The State Auditor’s Office is pleased overall with efforts by the Monarch Fire Protection District in Chesterfield to implement changes recommended in a recent audit.

In February, Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich (R) gave the Monarch Fire District a “C,” in part for its early retirement incentives package that violated the State Constitution.  Spokesman for the Auditor’s office, Spence Jackson, says their recommendations there have yet to be implemented.

“They told us that that’s not something that they’re going to have to deal with again for another couple of years," Jackson said.  "But they did indicate that they would apply more due diligence with how future retirement incentives are handled, and we’re pleased with that.”

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich has instructed his staff to stop doing financial estimates for ballot initiatives because of several recent court decisions.

Schweich says the court rulings have made it impossible to conduct financial estimates that can withstand legal challenges.

The memo telling staff to temporarily stop providing financial analyses for initiatives was obtained by The Associated Press under an open-records request.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Court approves $1.5 million settlement with former US Fidelis employees

More than 550 former employees of the auto services contract giant US  Fidelis will share in a nearly one point five million dollar settlement reached in bankruptcycourt.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Wednesday’s deal settles claims by the workers that they were not properly warned before being laid off.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

A pair of audits examining fee offices for driver’s licenses and motor vehicles was released today by Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich (R).

He told reporters the purpose of the audits was to see if the process of awarding bids to run the offices has been de-politicized.  One of the audits turned up at least one case of a not-for-profit group using a subcontractor to run 10 license fee offices, which Schweich says is against regulations.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Mo. National Guardsmen safe after insurgent attack

All 55 members of a Missouri National Guard agriculture team are safe following an insurgent attack on the forward operating base where they are stationed in Afghanistan.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) has announced an agreement with the Missouri Bankers Association over access to bank records.

The state of Missouri has stayed within a constitutional revenue limit for the 12th budget year in a row.

State auditor Tom Schweich released the yearly report on the Hancock amendment today. That amendment, passed in 1980, uses a mathematical formula to set a limit on the amount of personal income that can be used to fund the operations of state government. Any amount above that limit must be refunded to Missouri residents.

Jane Cunningham official website

St. Louis County Senator will not seek re-election

Jane Cunningham had initially filed to run for the 7th District seat, even though the new Senate map places that district in the Kansas City area.

The Republican from Chesterfield had hoped that the new map would be overturned and that the district she represents would not be moved to the other side of the state.  But that didn’t happen.  Cunningham says she most likely won’t run for a different office, but admits she hasn’t made up her mind yet:

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