On the Trail

On The Trail
6:01 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

Dooley Vs. St. Louis County Council: Will Schism Last Beyond August Primary?

Councilwoman Colleen Wasinger, R-Town and Country, Councilman Greg Quinn, R-Ballwin, and Councilman Steve Stenger, D-Affton, are part of a five-person coalition blocking some of St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley's agenda.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

The few long-time regulars at  St. Louis County Council meetings may be longing for the legislative body's customary 10-minute meetings after the past few weeks.

That’s because in recent weeks, the meetings have turned into lengthy – and often bitterly hostile – clashes between St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley and most of the council. But it's more than just legislative melodrama; a coalition of five council members (out of seven) have managed to block quite a bit of Dooley’s agenda.

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On The Trail
12:24 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Ronnie White's Nomination Recalls Past Battles — And Hard Feelings

Judge Ronnie White
Credit Missouri Supreme Court

Updated 12:22 p.m., Thurs., June 19: On June 19, the Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Ronnie White's nomination to the U.S. Senate floor. The committee's 10-7 affirmative vote makes it highly likely that White's nomination to the federal bench will be approved.

Here's the original story about White's nomination from April:

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On The Trail
8:03 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

Dooley Once Again Embroiled In Debate Over County Parks

The 2011 battle over proposed cuts to St. Louis County Parks is receiving attention again thanks to ads from Councilman Steve Stenger.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley has claimed in recent weeks that he never proposed shutting down county parks in 2011. But now, as the issue begins to heat up again, Dooley is, in his own words, "walking back" from his comments.

Dooley told St. Louis Public Radio that he “never proposed shutting down anything,” adding that “people will be saying things every election cycle about Charlie Dooley. Just because they say it doesn’t make it so.”

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On The Trail
10:39 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Analysis: Roads Far Outweigh Bikes In Transportation Tax List

Most of transportation tax project requests from the five East-West Gateway jurisdictions would go to road, highway and bridge projects.
Credit Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis area leaders squelched any doubts last week about how they want to spend money from a transportation sales tax. 

Sure, some of the regional projects funded with the .75 percent sales tax increase would bolster mass transit service or bike trails. But that's the exception rather than the rule: Most of the roughly $1.5 billion worth of requested projects would go toward roads, highways and bridges.

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On The Trail
11:17 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Agencies Scramble To Decide Projects For Early Transportation Tax Vote

Policymakers have until the end of the month to decide which transportation projects would be funded if a sales tax increase passes in August.
Credit (via Flickr/KOMUnews)

If you had $1.49 billion for transportation projects, how would you spend it? Would you repair highways? Bolster mass transit service? Enhance bike lanes?

This isn’t some academic exercise. The St. Louis region’s political leaders are considering how to divide the potential proceeds from a 0.75 percent sales tax increase for transportation. These decisions could have a transformative impact on how St. Louis area residents get around.

But here’s the twist: You have to make this decision very, very quickly.

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On the Trail
1:04 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

McCaskill And Nixon May Sing Different Tunes On Transportation Tax

Gov. Jay Nixon isn't exactly chomping at the bit to support a sales tax increase for transportation projects.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

When it comes to a proposal to raise the state’s sales tax to pay for transportation projects, two of Missouri’s top Democratic officials appear to be on opposing sides of the fence.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill favors the proposal, which – if approved by voters in August – would enact a 10-year, 0.75 percent sales tax for transportation projects. And even though he’s sent signals that he opposes the proposal, Gov. Jay Nixon is withholding statements about the tax increase for now.

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On The Trail
10:20 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

We Asked Five Questions About Missouri's Legislative Session; Here Are The Answers

This year's legislative session is in the books. But it's possible that a veto of the school transfer bill could put this year's session in to overtime.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Few could accuse the Missouri General Assembly of languishing during its last few days of session.

In fact, the legislature’s last dash was something of a whirlwind: It featured fierce debates over bills about student transfers and abortion restrictions. Lawmakers also sent proposals on a transportation tax and early voting procedures to the November ballot. Other efforts fizzled out, including last-minute pushes to expand and reconfigure the state’s Medicaid system.

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On the Trail
10:19 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

As City-County Merger Study Unfolds, Some Municipal Leaders Are Speaking Out

Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul is one of numerous municipal officials who are speaking out against a city-county merger.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul is no stranger to fighting city hall.

At this point last year, Paul was clawing his way back into office after a high-profile – and at-times bizarre – impeachment saga. Despite an intense and expensive effort from his political adversaries to remove him, Paul eventually kept his job as mayor. His town has generally been out of the headlines ever since.

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On the Trail
9:16 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

A Missouri Power Broker's Fall: Rod Jetton's New Book Raises Questions About Politics

Former House Speaker Rod Jetton's personal and political fortunes floundered amid intra-party conflict and personal turmoil. He has written a book detailing his downfall.
Tim Bommel, House Communications

Rod Jetton was once the most powerful lawmaker in Missouri.

As speaker of the Missouri House, he had the power to exalt or kill any bill that flowed through the General Assembly. From all appearances, he had a bright political future.

Behind the scenes, however, Jetton was on a course for self-destruction. 

By the time he left office, the FBI was investigating him for bribery. He was facing serious jail time after being accused of felony assault. Just months after being one of the most powerful men in Missouri politics, Jetton was broke and without a job.

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On the Trail
11:54 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Is Smaller Better? Multitude Of Municipalities Plays Into City-County Merger Debate

Charlie Giraud moved to Greendale, Missouri, in the mid-2000s. While town's tiny size wasn't a factor in his decision, he says there's plenty to like about the north St. Louis County village.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Greendale is home to about 700 people in north St. Louis County. The primarily residential community features stately brick houses along seven, well-maintained streets. The town’s city hall consists of two rooms inside an office building. It contracts with nearby Normandy for police service. Its big-ticket expenditures include cleaning streets and trimming trees.

Charlie Giraud found a lot to like. He’s lived in bigger St. Louis County municipalities like Ballwin and University City. He appreciated Greendale’s friendly neighbors, racial diversity and close-knit community.

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