tuition

Field of students at a graduation
(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

A four-year pilot initiative in Quincy hopes to develop a pipeline of skilled workers to fill technical jobs at local businesses.

Karissa Anderson (left) of the Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis and DACA student Naomi Carranza (right) joined host Don Marsh in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

A small but critical addition to a Missouri budget bill may keep the children of undocumented immigrants from attending state public universities by raising their tuition to the amounts international students pay. Now, those students are fighting the law by asking Governor Jay Nixon for help.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

More than a dozen college students whose parents illegally entered the United States years ago are asking Gov. Jay Nixon for help with suddenly higher tuition rates.

Lawmakers added language to the preamble of a budget bill stating that students who are "unlawfully in the United States" don't qualify for in-state tuition rates and cannot receive scholarships.

Millennium Student Center at UMSL
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

Students who have lived in Missouri for nearly all of their lives and graduated from Missouri schools are no longer considered Missourians when it comes to the tuition they must pay at public colleges and universities.

Millennium Student Center at UMSL
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 4:04 p.m. with more on the tuition debate:

Students at the University of Missouri will pay just 0.8 percent more in tuition and fees at the four-campus university system for the coming school year, but the school’s leaders say they need to get more money from the state so they can charge students less.

UMSL website

Despite financial concerns that threatened to derail its approval, a $17 million building for the optometry program at the University of Missouri-St. Louis won passage Friday, but not without reservations over how it will be paid for.

Updated at 10:12 p.m. with investigator hired for Courey case:

Tuition for resident undergraduate students at the four campuses of the University of Missouri will remain flat for the coming school year after a unanimous vote by the Board of Curators Wednesday.

Meeting in Columbia, the curators went along unanimously with a recommendation by university President Tim Wolfe. He in turn was agreeing with a wish expressed by Gov. Jay Nixon last week in his State of the State address.

UM website

The president of the University of Missouri says he will go along with Gov. Jay Nixon’s request and recommend that tuition for the system’s four campuses not go up next year.

Tim Wolfe, who visited with junior and senior high school students in the Bayless School District in south St. Louis County Friday morning, said that the additional revenue proposed by Nixon in his State of the State address earlier this week should provide the four-campus system with the money it needs without raising tuition.

(File images)

During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

(via Flickr/Adam Procter)

Updated at 5 p.m. following the presentation to the Board of Curators.

Students at the four campuses of the University of Missouri system are likely to face tuition and fee increases again next year as the school struggles to cope with an ongoing decrease in state funding.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Mo. General Assembly sends probation and parole reforms to Gov. Nixon

The Missouri General Assembly has sent Gov. Jay Nixon a measure that could reduce the amount of time some non-violent felons in the state spend on probation and parole.

The state Senate approved the measure yesterday 24-3, shortly after the state House did the same thing without opposition.

(via Flickr/Adam Procter)

University of Missouri Curators to consider raising tuition today

The special meeting comes after the governing board postponed consideration of a tuition increase three weeks ago at its regular meeting in Kansas City. This time, the curators will meet by video teleconference along with new university president Tim Wolfe.  

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis Archbishop Robert Carlson says some schools in the archdiocese will have to close in the years ahead to sustain Missouri's oldest and largest school system.

"I just think it's inevitable when you look at the number of children families are having," he said.

The Archbishop said school consolidations are also likely to play a bigger part in addressing shrinking enrollment and tuition revenue, as when three south county elementary schools consolidated last year to create Holy Cross Academy. 

(via Flickr/ilovebutter)

Reporting by WILL's Sean Powers was used in this story.

The trustees of the University of Illinois system have approved a 4.8 percent tuition hike for incoming freshmen at the system's three campuses.

The vote today means incoming freshmen will pay $532 more a year at the main campus in Champaign-Urbana, $468 more in Chicago, and $420 more in Springfield.

(Flickr/Brian Hillegas)
  • Missouri officials say freight has started moving again on the Missouri River – even before the official start of the shipping season. The Missouri Department of Transportation says that cement, fertilizer and other freight was being transported on the river this week. The U.S. Coast Guard is to place navigational buoys on the waterway April 1. State transportation officials say their goal is to boost the amount of products moved by barge on the Missouri River. About 334,000 tons of freight was transported on the river last year, up about 24 percent from 2009.

  • Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says the federal health care law's legal fate is still uncertain. Koster's statement comes in response to three Republican officials who asked him whether he thought the law could be enforced in Missouri. Two federal judges upheld the health care overhaul. A third struck down the insurance requirement, and a fourth ruled the entire law is unconstitutional. Appeals courts will consider those rulings. Koster says Missouri risks possible sanctions by not complying with the law while waiting for a definitive ruling. Koster says lawmakers and the governor will have to weigh the risks of possible sanctions against costs for complying with the law. The GOP officials who requested the legal analysis criticized Koster's response for not being sufficiently specific.

  • Trustees at the University of Illinois are scheduled to vote on a plan to increase tuition by 6.9 percent for  students who start this fall. That means new students at the university's Urbana-Champaign campus would pay $11,104 a year in tuition. Students at the Chicago campus would pay $9,764, while students in Springfield would pay $8,670. Those figures don't include fees, room and board. Last year, trustees raised tuition by 9.5 percent. University spokesman Thomas Hardy calls the increase trustees are scheduled to consider today "a conservative proposal." Hardy says it keeps in mind the concerns of families and the financial needs of the university.

Updated at 3:08 p.m. Jan. 28, 2011 with comment from Erdman and Krawitz.

Reporting from KBIA's Courtney Flatt also used in this report.

Krawitz says 20 percent of the revenue generated form the tuition increase will be put into financial aid.

Tuition at the four University of Missouri campuses will increase for the first time in two years after a vote by the systems' Board of Curators.

The University of Missouri system board of curators voted today on their recommendations for tuition increases for each of the system's campuses.

KMOV reports the recommended increases for in-state undergraduate tuition as follows:

University of Missouri leaders met by teleconference today to discuss tuition and fee increases across the four-campus system.

Curators looked at figures and possible scenarios prepared by the UM vice president Nikke Krawitz.

A 10 percent increase in tuition - the highest increase scenario on the table - would contribute about $44 million to the coffers.

That doesn't even come close, Krawitz says, to meeting an estimated $64 million gap.

But what's the bottom line for Krawitz?

(Flickr Creative Commons User Adam Procter)

Updated with results of the Board of Curators Meeting:

A tuition increase at the four University of Missouri campuses appears likely in the coming academic year. But how much?

Documents released Thursday say the university will "strive to keep (any) increase to single digit(s)," subject to state support.

A budget overview provided to the board was grim, projecting a $105 million state funding gap.

From Earlier: