tuition

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Reporting by WILL's Sean Powers was used in this story.

The trustees of the University of Illinois system have approved a 4.8 percent tuition hike for incoming freshmen at the system's three campuses.

The vote today means incoming freshmen will pay $532 more a year at the main campus in Champaign-Urbana, $468 more in Chicago, and $420 more in Springfield.

(Flickr/Brian Hillegas)
  • Missouri officials say freight has started moving again on the Missouri River – even before the official start of the shipping season. The Missouri Department of Transportation says that cement, fertilizer and other freight was being transported on the river this week. The U.S. Coast Guard is to place navigational buoys on the waterway April 1. State transportation officials say their goal is to boost the amount of products moved by barge on the Missouri River. About 334,000 tons of freight was transported on the river last year, up about 24 percent from 2009.

  • Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says the federal health care law's legal fate is still uncertain. Koster's statement comes in response to three Republican officials who asked him whether he thought the law could be enforced in Missouri. Two federal judges upheld the health care overhaul. A third struck down the insurance requirement, and a fourth ruled the entire law is unconstitutional. Appeals courts will consider those rulings. Koster says Missouri risks possible sanctions by not complying with the law while waiting for a definitive ruling. Koster says lawmakers and the governor will have to weigh the risks of possible sanctions against costs for complying with the law. The GOP officials who requested the legal analysis criticized Koster's response for not being sufficiently specific.

  • Trustees at the University of Illinois are scheduled to vote on a plan to increase tuition by 6.9 percent for  students who start this fall. That means new students at the university's Urbana-Champaign campus would pay $11,104 a year in tuition. Students at the Chicago campus would pay $9,764, while students in Springfield would pay $8,670. Those figures don't include fees, room and board. Last year, trustees raised tuition by 9.5 percent. University spokesman Thomas Hardy calls the increase trustees are scheduled to consider today "a conservative proposal." Hardy says it keeps in mind the concerns of families and the financial needs of the university.

Updated at 3:08 p.m. Jan. 28, 2011 with comment from Erdman and Krawitz.

Reporting from KBIA's Courtney Flatt also used in this report.

Krawitz says 20 percent of the revenue generated form the tuition increase will be put into financial aid.

Tuition at the four University of Missouri campuses will increase for the first time in two years after a vote by the systems' Board of Curators.

The University of Missouri system board of curators voted today on their recommendations for tuition increases for each of the system's campuses.

KMOV reports the recommended increases for in-state undergraduate tuition as follows:

University of Missouri leaders met by teleconference today to discuss tuition and fee increases across the four-campus system.

Curators looked at figures and possible scenarios prepared by the UM vice president Nikke Krawitz.

A 10 percent increase in tuition - the highest increase scenario on the table - would contribute about $44 million to the coffers.

That doesn't even come close, Krawitz says, to meeting an estimated $64 million gap.

But what's the bottom line for Krawitz?

(Flickr Creative Commons User Adam Procter)

Updated with results of the Board of Curators Meeting:

A tuition increase at the four University of Missouri campuses appears likely in the coming academic year. But how much?

Documents released Thursday say the university will "strive to keep (any) increase to single digit(s)," subject to state support.

A budget overview provided to the board was grim, projecting a $105 million state funding gap.

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