Protesters are greeted by lines of state and county police during a demonstration march on the Ferguson police station on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

An upcoming conference on Ferguson has promised “not to re-litigate the past,” but organizers instead hope to draw lessons for the future on both the rights of protesters and the difficult job that police officers face when they put on their uniforms each day. “The Ethics of Ferguson – Policing, Prosecuting, and Protesting” is the name of the conference, which will take place at Harris-Stowe State University on Friday, Nov. 20.

Mark Regester

When Temple Grandin, famed autism activist and professor of animal science at Colorado State University, was 13 she was employed by a freelance seamstress to do sewing projects. When she was 15, she cleaned 8 horse stalls every day. By the time she finished college, she had carpentry work, sign painting, and farm management under her belt.

Millennium Student Center at UMSL
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 3:17 p.m. Nov. 2, with reaction: Just four months after announcing the creation of a new School of Public Policy and Administration, the University of Missouri-St. Louis has abruptly decided to dissolve the school because of budget problems.

Word came early Monday from Provost Glen Cope in a campus-wide email, hours before a candidate for permanent dean of the school was to be interviewed.

Tom George, Chancellor of UMSL
Alex Heuer

Despite a 10 percent decline in state funding since 2010, the University of Missouri-St. Louis continues to excel in offering top-tier educational opportunities for its students, UMSL Chancellor Tom George says.

He told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh that the university is undergoing a slew of capital constructions including:

Alla Voskoboynikova grew up in a small town in Russia near Moscow. She received both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in piano performance before moving to St. Louis in 1996.

Since 2004, Voskoboynikova, the director of Keyboard Studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, has seen many of her former students go on to graduate school and successful careers as performers and teachers.

“This is probably the greatest reward for all the hours of hard work,” Voskoboynikova told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

As a girl growing up in Bel-Nor, Melanie Ziebatree recalls riding her bicycle around the neighborhood and taking in the majestic view of the Incarnate Word convent on Normandy Drive, across from the Normandie golf course.

(Via University of Missouri-St. Louis)

The University of Missouri-St. Louis is announcing Wednesday that it raised a record-setting $31 million in the fiscal year ending June 30. This year’s total was $10 million more than last year and included nine gifts of more than $1 million each.

In a statement, Martin Leifeld, the vice chancellor for university advancement, praised alumni and friends for their commitment to UMSL.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

The unveiling of Catherine Magel’s “Changing Identities” sculpture as a poignant moment for Normandy Mayor Patrick Green. 

The unveiling showcases a community development organization for the municipalities surrounding the University of Missouri-St. Louis. But it was also a tribute to four people who died in a 1997 bus crash in north St. Louis County.

Dan Younger

On display now at the Sheldon Art Galleries is “Dan Younger: Travel Places,” a collection of photographs by University of Missouri-St. Louis Art Professor Dan Younger.  

The photographs were taken at U.S. tourist destinations over the span of ten years, the result of Younger’s habit of carrying two cameras – one for his family and one for art. Taken in public spaces, they fall under the category of “street photography.”

(Courtesy United Designs International Biennial Design Exhibition)

Posters are designed to be functional, usually to get a message out quickly. This often means they are here today and gone tomorrow. But an exhibit currently on display at the University of Missouri - St. Louis gives a little more longevity and exposure to the art form by displaying 100 posters by graphic designers from 40 countries.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Charles Darwin revolutionized science. His theory of evolution was based on careful observations of birds and other wildlife in places like the Galapagos Islands.

One thing that has been really slow to evolve is the gender mix in science. Men still dominate many scientific fields, just like they did in Darwin’s day, more than 150 years ago.

But gradually, more women are breaking in.

I met up with two young women scientists in ― where else? ― the Galapagos. Here are their stories.

Maricruz Jaramillo fulfills a dream

(Sarah Skiöld-Hanlin/St. Louis Public Radio)

It has been just over three months since the federal spending cuts known as sequestration first took effect.

A handful of programs were spared — but not scientific research, which amounts to about $140 billion in annual government spending.

As St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra found out, at universities here in St. Louis, some scientists are worried about what the budget cuts will mean for their research — and for their students.

"I had to let go of some science."

Marianne Leach

When a symphony orchestra performs Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana,” it’s always something of a spectacle.  The stage is packed to the brim with a large orchestra including two pianos and celeste, vocal soloists, a chorus and children’s chorus.  But Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling’s vision of “Carmina Burana” employing 120 singers, 60 orchestral musicians and 40 dancers takes the work to new proportions. 

(via Flickr/jtbrennan)

Synesthesia is a complex and rare condition in which input from one sense is perceived through another sense.

The abilities of people to see what they hear or hear what they see are just two examples.

A significant amount of research into the condition is being conducted at the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh spoke with UMSL philosophy professor Brit Brogaard and with UMSL philosophy graduate student Kristian Marlow, who participated in the research.

Also joining the program were two synesthetes:

The University of Missouri – St. Louis kicks off its Golden Jubilee year with a celebration on February 1.  Chancellor Tom George was Don Marsh’s guest on “St. Louis on the Air” to reflect on the university’s growth in its first half-century as well as to discuss trends and challenges in higher education.

Photograph by August Jennewein/UMSL

When a family has 10 children who all study music, it’s natural that some of them might form an ensemble.  In the case of the Dickson family, 4 of them not only formed a string quartet, but all entered college at the same time, halfway across the country.  

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom announced on Monday that he will be stepping down as chief by the end of the year.  Isom will join the faculty of the Department of Criminology at the University of Missouri—St. Louis.

Isom, 45, took over as chief four years ago following the resignation of Joe Mokwa, who was linked to an illegal tow-lot scandal.

Speaking on UMSL’s campus, Isom said it was hard to move on after 24 years in the department, but the opportunity to teach at his alma mater was too good to ignore.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Civil disobedience in Nazi Germany was a difficult task. Those who did push back against the right-wing extremism of Adolf Hitler risked their limited freedom, or even their lives.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

St. Louis to demolish plywood shacks near Mississippi River

Demolition will begin Friday at a row of plywood shacks near the Mississippi River in St. Louis where 10 homeless people have been evacuated. 

It is the first of three riverfront encampments the city ordered shut down. St. Louis Human Services Director Bill Siedhoff has said that he hopes to have all three encampments cleared out by May 18 after reports of violent crime and rat infestation.

(Jerry Bauer)

The University of Missouri-Saint Louis is hosting a conference on “consilience.”

UMSL evolutionary ecologist Patty Parker says consilience is the idea that certain universal concepts hold true across disciplines, from biology to the social sciences to the humanities.