Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

It was a much different scene than 11 months ago at 9420 West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.

The parking lot of the former QuikTrip was ground zero for protests in the days following Michael Brown’s death on August 9. The burned-out shell of the store and graffiti was a reminder of the looting and violence that descended on the street.

A rendering of the planned jobs center was unveiled by the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis on Monday.
Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio

What became a symbol of the unrest in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9 will become a "phoenix rising."

That's the hope of officials with the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis who are planning a $500,000 jobs center on the site of the burned-out QuikTrip at 9240 W. Florissant Ave. 

The QuikTrip on West Florissant Ave. was looted and burned on Aug. 10, the day after Michael Brown's death.
Jason Rosenbaum|St. Louis Public Radio

The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis will build a new center on the site of a burned-out QuikTrip in Ferguson.

National Urban League Young Professional President Brandi Richard encourages a group of teenage girls to be supportive in their comments to each other.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Mutual respect. Mentorship. Giving back. Knowing your rights and the best way to act on them. These are a few of the solutions decided on during a town hall in St. Louis on Saturday seeking ways to improve social justice outcomes for African Americans.

Mike McMillan, president and CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on Jan. 28, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

The Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson changed everything.

Save Our Sons, Urban League, Mike McMillan
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis has launched a job training and placement program in north St. Louis County called Save Our Sons. The effort is getting serious corporate support — and a dash of Hollywood.

At a news conference Tuesday, Urban League CEO Michael McMillan announced $1.25 million in corporate donations toward the project:

Job seekers attend a job held on Sept. 13
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

A large crowd of eager job-seekers lined up at St. Louis Community College - Florissant Valley  Saturday for the Urban League’s Job and Resource Fair. At least 90 companies, many with positions to fill, joined the fair, including BJC Healthcare, the Missouri Highway Patrol and St. Louis Community Credit Union.

Available jobs ranged across the spectrum of careers and education levels, from law enforcement to health care. BJC alone had a thousand jobs to fill.

Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Dozens were arrested Wednesday afternoon during an attempted act of civil disobedience in north St. Louis County. Prior to the demonstration, protest organizers said they wanted a special prosecutor appointed for the county’s investigation into the death of Michael Brown. The goal was to shut down Interstate 70 at Hanley Road, but a strong police presence prevented demonstrators from reaching their goal.

Robert Joiner

Five months after settling in as the new CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, Michael McMillan has been busy putting his imprint on the community service and civil rights organization. It’s a big responsibility, given the accomplishments of his predecessor, James Buford, who built the local group into the most successful affiliate of the National Urban League.

With a $23 million annual budget, the organization offers a range of services, from job training to utility assistance, to about 60,000 people.

Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis

A year ago, James Buford announced that he intended to retire after almost three decades as President and CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis.  He just celebrated his 69th birthday and May 31 was to have been his last day. But instead, he was asked to stay on another month while the agency completes the process of hiring his successor. He will then serve in a consulting capacity to help the new CEO get acclimated to the position.