U.S. Census | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Census

The U.S. Census Bureau hired more than 600,000 temporary workers for the 2010 census.
U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau officially announced its recruiting drive for the 2020 census on Monday. The bureau may face challenges finding enough qualified candidates to fill thousands of openings, including positions in Missouri and Illinois.

There is concern that there won’t be enough people looking to work on the census. In July, the U.S. Census Bureau published a blog post that sounded the alarm about the pool of candidates for 2020 jobs. Officials worry that the current low unemployment rate, around 4 percent, means the bureau won’t get the millions of applications it needs to fill the temporary positions.

All states experienced an increase in the percentage of interracial and interethnic married-couple households from 2000 to 2012-2016.
U.S. Census Bureau

The rate of interracial marriages in Missouri is increasing at a rate slower than other states, according to a recent U.S. Census Bureau report.

Results from the American Community Survey show the percentage of interracial married-couple households increased from 7.4 to 10.2 percent between 2000 and 2012-2016 nationwide.

The St. Louis region grew slightly in 2014, but the city dropped by about 1,000 people, according to new Census data.
U.S. Marine Corps Flickr page

Black residents are leaving the city of St. Louis in greater numbers than ever, according to 2017 estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau released on Thursday. The statistics show more than 4,000 black St. Louis residents chose to live elsewhere between 2016 and 2017.

"Part of what’s driving this is that in parts of the city the quality of life has declined, where residents have decided that they are looking for other homes," said Onesimo Sandoval, a demographer at Saint Louis University. "Better access to schools, better access to opportunities such as jobs, resources."

For African-Americans and people from Africa and the African diaspora, the 2020 census is already raising questions.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The 2020 census is still two years away, but there is plenty of buzz about what the federal survey will ask, including questions about citizenship and country of origin.

For the first time, people will be able to write in their origins in a blank box on the census instead of just checking a race.

The survey, which happens every ten years, is designed to count the population so federal funds can be allocated across the country. But the new questions about where people come from can generate confusion or suspicion — especially from African-Americans, who may not know where their ancestors originated, or immigrants who believe their responses might be used against them in the future.

The region actually grew slightly from 2016 to 2017, but Baltimore and other cities gained more residents in the same period.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show that the St. Louis metropolitan area continues to lose ground compared to other cities.

Data released Thursday show the area, which includes St. Louis City and 14 neighboring Missouri and Illinois counties, dropped to the 21st most populous metropolitan area in 2017. Baltimore replaced St. Louis in the 20th position.

This fall, U.S. Census Bureau workers will come to St. Louis to verify, using in part smartphones, the agency's address lists, compiled using a new method. Those lists will help the Bureau conduct the 2020 Census.
U.S. Census Bureau

Illinois got smaller. Missouri got bigger (slightly). And western states seem to have a pull on people looking to relocate. That’s according to the U.S. Census Bureau's annual population estimates that were released on December 20.

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The number three
Tom Huesing | Flickr

According to estimates released by the U.S. Census, three local cities are among 10 in Illinois and Missouri that gained the most people between 2015 and 2016. The  numbers are estimates of the population for cities and towns across the United States.  

Wentzville, in St. Charles County, grew by more than 1,800 people, second only to Kansas City. O'Fallon, Missouri was 4th on the list, gaining about 1,400, and Clayton, in St. Louis County came in 8th, with an increase of around 750.

A silver number 5 on a grey background.
Flickr | Stephan Mosel

St. Louis continues to lose population, according to current city population estimates for 2015 released by the U.S. Census. Between 2014 and 2015, more than 1,500 residents are estimated to have left the city.

Here are five takeaways from the data released today.

1. Cities in our area are part of the national picture, both positively and negatively.

St. Louis' loss of population was the 7th largest in the country. Detroit and Chicago were No. 1 and No. 2.

Flickr | DIGITIZEDCHAOS

St. Charles County remains the fastest growing county in the St. Louis region, according to U.S. census data released Thursday.

New numbers from the 2014 American Community Survey show that the population of St. Charles County has grown by about 5 percent since 2010, from an estimated 361,602 to an estimated 379,493.

Demographics analyst and Saint Louis University professor Ness Sandoval points to the county’s relatively low cost of living as the cause of the growth.

Trial court rejects challenge to state House districts

Feb 14, 2012
(Missouri State Redistricting Office)

It's been a busy day in Missouri courts today.

Earlier on Tuesday, the Missouri Supreme Court struck down an ethics law because the measure originally dealt with state procurement.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 2, 2011 - Census Bureau data released this fall highlight the increase in poverty and the plight of Missouri's middle class following the economic recession. Unemployment and poverty have risen, while median household income has fallen. Fortunately, as Missouri families struggle to make ends meet and provide for their children, public services are preventing even more Missourians from falling into poverty. But budget cuts in Washington, mandated by the budget deal and failure of the "super" committee threaten those services.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 2, 2011 -  According to the Census, "People who reported their race as both black and white more than doubled from about 785,000 in 2000 to 1.8 million in 2010."

On Thursday night, Tracy Overton took her two children to see "The Addams Family" at the Fox. While there, she saw something she doesn't often see -- another biracial family.

New Census Bureau report: 15 percent of Missourians are poor

Sep 13, 2011
(via Flickr/LarimdaME)

Updated 2:46 p.m. with additional contextual information

A newly released report shows that nearly 15 percent of people in Missouri are poor.

The Census Bureau's annual report released Tuesday offers a snapshot of the economic well-being of U.S. households for 2010, when joblessness hovered above 9 percent for a second year.

Nationally, nearly 1 in 6 people were classified as poor.

Meanwhile, the share of Americans without health coverage rose from 16.1 percent to 16.3 percent - or 49.9 million people - after the Census Bureau made revisions to numbers of the uninsured. That is due mostly to continued losses of employer-provided health insurance in the weakened economy.

In Missouri, 14 percent of residents lacked insurance.

But how does today's data compare with the numbers in years prior?

Census shows jump in Illinois same-sex households

Aug 4, 2011
(via Flickr/lacylouwho)

New U.S. Census Bureau figures show the number of Illinois households run by same-sex couples has jumped nearly 42 percent in the last decade.

That's from 22,887 in 2000 to 32,469 last year.

The trend in Illinois mirrors those nationwide and that of the data released recently on neighboring state Missouri. Experts and advocates say social attitudes toward same-sex couples are changing.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 28, 2011 - The 2010 census data began coming out in February, giving us a big picture sense of what's happening in our region.

On Thursday, the first wave of data was released to the public with the most detailed findings yet, including information about household types and age on a block by block level. While the St. Louis Beacon will be analyzing that data in our ongoing series Countdown, here's a quick glance at what's happening in Missouri. 

Census shows increase in Mo. same-sex households

Jul 28, 2011
(via Flickr/lacylouwho)

The number of Missouri households led by same-sex partners has increased by more than 60 percent over the past decade.

New figures from the U.S. Census Bureau show Missouri had more than 15,000 households led by someone living with a same-sex partner. Of those, slightly more than 7,000 involved male partners and 8,200 were female partners. There were children in about one-quarter of those households.

The latest round of population information was released late Wednesday.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A unanimous vote today by the legislation committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen kicked off the public part of the city's redistricting process.

Morning headlines: Thursday, May 19, 2011

May 19, 2011
SLPRnews

Missouri Census Figures Show Increase in Retirement Age Population

The U.S. Census Bureau released the latest round of population figures last night. They show Missourian's median age is now 37.9. That's up nearly two years from the 36.1 median in 2000. Missouri's retirement-age population of people at least 65 years old grew by more than 10 percent since 2000. And residents 85 years and older grew by 15 percent - though they still account for less than 2 percent of the nearly 6 million people living in Missouri. At the same time, the number of school-aged children between 5 and 14 years old declined over the decade.

Mo. House Communications

A State House committee’s plan to redraw Missouri’s congressional districts is drawing fire from both urban and rural residents and from both political parties.

The state is losing a seat in Congress based on the latest U.S. Census figures.

Plato, Mo., sits at center of nation's population

Mar 24, 2011

View Mean Center of U.S. Population 2010 in a larger map

It's official: The new center of the U.S. population is in Missouri, about 2.7 miles northeast of the village of Plato (see above for location).

The Census Bureau said Thursday that steady migration to the Sun Belt had pushed the site roughly 30 miles southwest of the previous location near Edgar Springs, Mo.

It is the fourth Missouri town to hold the distinction. Plato, located in Texas County, had a 2010 population of 109 people.

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