Vehicle Stops Report | St. Louis Public Radio

Vehicle Stops Report

Redditt Hudson, of the Urban League of St. Louis, was one of several local advocates responding to the 2017 Vehicle Stops Report on June 4, 2018.
Ashley Lisenby | St. Louis Public Radio

Black drivers are more likely to be stopped by police than other groups in Missouri. That’s what a report from Attorney General Josh Hawley’s office shows from data collected in 2017.

The annual Vehicle Stops Report shows black drivers were stopped at a rate of 85 percent higher than white drivers throughout the state. Black and Hispanic drivers were searched at higher rates than average as well. In cases of searches, white drivers were reportedly found with contraband more often.

Photo of police car
Jason Rojas | Flickr

Updated 6:20 p.m. June 2

Missouri state officials are under pressure to respond to a report that shows disparities between blacks and whites in traffic stops are the worst they've been since the state began collecting data 15 years ago.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Police stopped more than a million drivers in Missouri in 2013, statistics released Friday show, with African Americans still more likely to be pulled over than whites.

The Missouri Attorney General's office released the annual Vehicle Stops Report (VSR) Friday. In a statement, Attorney General Chris Koster said that the disproportionate number of stops of African American is less than ideal, but should serve as a way to start talking about how to remediate the trend.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: African-American drivers in Missouri are more likely to be pulled over by police although subsequent vehicle searches show that white drivers are more likely to be carrying something illegal.

And Hispanic drivers -- while the least likely to be pulled over -- are the most likely of the three groups to be searched. While they were the least likely to be carrying anything illegal, Hispanic drivers were the most likely to get arrested.