Washington University in St. Louis

A still frame of Avik Som working in a lab, taken from a promotional video shot by Washington University in St. Louis.
provided by Washington University

A Ph.D. student at Washington University’s School of Medicine has published the results of a surprising discovery: Calcium carbonate, the common compound found in antacids like Tums, can be used to stop tumor growth in mice.

Here’s how it works: Cancer tumors need an acidic environment to survive. Calcium carbonate, on the other hand, is a base. In a swimming pool, bases can counteract acidity to neutralize the pH of the water and make it safe to swim. 

A researcher in a neurology clinic at Washington University in St. Louis.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Researchers at Washington University's McDonnell Genome Institute in St. Louis will expand their work into common illnesses like Type 1 diabetes, stroke and arthritis, thanks to a $60 million federal grant.