Washington University

biology
3:00 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Daylight Saving Time: More Trouble Than It's Worth?

Credit (via Flickr/the Italian voice)

If you’re feeling tired due to the daylight savings shift, you’re not alone. One researcher at Washington University says the time change may cause more problems than it solves.

Erik Herzog studies the biological clocks of mammals. He says several studies have shown that daylight saving is hard on us humans, especially the “spring ahead.” Effects like sleep deprivation result in increased traffic accidents for three days after the time change.

Herzog says the effect in the fall is the opposite – there are fewer traffic accidents – but that effect lasts only one day.

Read more
Medical Ethics - Genetics
2:17 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Whole Genome Sequencing Is Here To Stay. What Does That Mean For Genetic Privacy?

Adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine (abbreviated ATCG) are the four nucleotide bases that make up DNA.
Credit Jane Ades, NHGRI

Originally published on Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Updated to include audio from St. Louis on the Air.

Read more
Washington U. provost
10:36 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

New Washington U. Provost Likes Being 'Mr. Inside'

Holden Thorp
Credit Washington University website

Seated in his office on the second floor of Brookings Hall on the eastern edge of the Washington University campus, Provost Holden Thorp has a pretty good metaphor for what his job entails compared with that of university Chancellor Mark Wrighton.

“You can see the chancellor’s office is across the hall,” Thorp said in a recent interview. “His office faces the park and the Arch and downtown. My office is on this side and faces out to the old quad.

Read more
Childhood Obesity
5:00 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Preventing Childhood Obesity: A Conversation With Wash U's Debra Haire-Joshu

(Via Flickr/InspiredHomeFitness)

Obesity has increased dramatically in the United States over the past several decades.

In Missouri, almost two-thirds of adults ― and more than a quarter of children and teens ― are either overweight or obese.

Read more
Stroke Care
8:01 am
Sat October 26, 2013

Wash U Study Confirms Medication, Lifestyle Changes Safer Than Surgery For Some Stroke Patients

(via Wikimedia Commons/Blausen Medical)

Research led by Washington University confirms that medication and lifestyle changes are safer and more effective at preventing certain strokes than surgery.

Most strokes are caused by a reduction in blood flow to the brain ― usually from a blocked artery in the heart or neck. In about a tenth of cases, a narrowed brain artery is to blame.

Read more
Education
3:44 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Wash U., SLU Study Finds Physical, Mental Health Play 'Surprising' Role In High School Dropout Rates

(via Flickr/NWABR)

A multi-disciplinary study released today finds that in relation to school dropout rates, health plays a bigger role than one might think.

The study is part of ‘For The Sake of All,’ a five part series from Washington University and Saint Louis University that focuses on the health of African Americans in the St. Louis region.

Read more
Breast Cancer
3:24 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

For Young Women, Drinking Alcohol Increases The Risk Of Breast Cancer

Young women who average a drink per day have a 13 percent higher risk of developing breast cancer than non-drinkers, according to researchers at Wash U.
Washington University

Updated on August 29 to change 13% to 11% after further clarification from study co-author Graham Colditz.

A new study out of Washington University suggests that young women who drink regularly are at increased risk for developing breast cancer.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
5:03 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

New Cybersecurity Education Programs Offered By St. Louis Area Universities

(via Flickr/espensorvik)

Employment in the field of information security, web development and computer networks—cybersecurity—is expected to increase 22 percent by 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. Washington University and Fontbonne University are offering new cybersecurity programs this Fall in response to the growing demand in the workforce for people in this field. 

Read more
Washington University
3:02 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

Washington University To Build New Research Facility

The new research facility will be positioned along McKinley Avenue, west of Taylor Avenue in St. Louis' Central West End neighborhood. The building design is by Goody Clancy, in association with Christner Inc.
Credit (Rendering courtesy of Washington University)

This summer, the Washington University School of Medicine intends to break ground on a new research facility.

The six-story, 138,000 square-foot facility is part of an ongoing effort by the university to encourage interdisciplinary research in biology and medicine.

The $75 million project is slated to house researchers involved in genetics, genomics and biological regeneration.

Washington University says the new facility will help replace aging laboratories with energy-efficient, flexible and open research space.

Read more
Science Research
4:30 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Sequestration Budget Cuts Hit St. Louis Scientists

Rachel Delston works with cancer cells in the lab at Confluence Life Sciences.
(Sarah Skiöld-Hanlin/St. Louis Public Radio)

It has been just over three months since the federal spending cuts known as sequestration first took effect.

A handful of programs were spared — but not scientific research, which amounts to about $140 billion in annual government spending.

As St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra found out, at universities here in St. Louis, some scientists are worried about what the budget cuts will mean for their research — and for their students.

"I had to let go of some science."

Read more

Pages