Washington University

St. Louis on the Air
6:45 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Wash U Has Four Of The World’s Top Researchers

Professor Richard K. Wilson, Director of the Genomics Institute at Washington University in St. Louis
(Courtesy: Washington University in St. Louis)

Four of the top twenty-one influential researchers in the world live in the St. Louis area.

The researchers are from Washington University in St. Louis and all are in the field of genomics.  The findings come from Thomson Reuters ScienceWatch, an open web resource for science metrics and analysis.

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Global Health
5:40 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Wash U To Engineer Bacteria To Kill Intestinal Parasites

An adult female roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) can reach over a foot in length.
Credit U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

A Washington University researcher has received a $100,000 global health grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support research focused on preventing the transmission of parasitic diseases in developing countries.

Although there are drugs to help kill parasitic worms and their eggs in the human body, stopping their transmission in the environment is challenging.

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Business - Technology
5:40 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Major Boston-Area Startup Incubator To Join Wash U In New Cortex Facility

The new Cortex facility on Duncan Avenue will be known as @4240.
Credit HOK

One of the country’s largest startup incubators will soon be moving into the Cortex bioscience district in St. Louis.

The move marks Cambridge Innovation Center’s first expansion out of the Boston area, where it houses more than 500 small to mid-sized companies.

CIC’s president and CEO, Ranch Kimball, says he expects the new St. Louis facility to attract mostly technology startups, but says CIC will be open to a variety of businesses.

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Urban Development
4:42 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Land Lab Aims To Find New Use for Vacant Lots

Future site of the chess "pocket park."
Adam Allington St. Louis Public Radio

If you live in any big city in the Midwest, and St. Louis in particular, you’re probably all too familiar with the site of vacant, empty land where homes and businesses used to be. 

This issue of vacant land in an otherwise urban environment presents tough challenges for cities.  This weekend ground will be broken on several projects which aim to change the way neighborhoods and cities deal with vacant property.

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Features
5:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

'The Muslim Guy' And Wash. U. Alum Arsalan Iftikhar On Marathon Bombings And Muslims In Daily Life

Iftikhar was in town to receive a Distinguished Young Law Alumni Award from Washington University. He received his Bachelors degree in 1999 and his Jurius Doctorate in 2003.
Credit Erin Williams

Since his days as a student in the classrooms of Washington University, Arsalan Iftikhar has made a career out of educating others on the myths and realities in the Muslim world.        

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Global Health
4:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Wash U Center Aims To Increase Collaboration On Global Health

Technicians test blood for filariasis, a parasitic infection, in a field laboratory in the town of Madingou in the Republic of Congo. Their work is part of project led by Dr. Gary Weil of the Washington University Center for Global Health and Infectious Disease.
Credit Gary Weil/Washington University School of Medicine

Researchers from all over the world are gathering today at Washington University for a conference on global health.

The event is the first to be organized by the university’s recently-created Center for Global Health and Infectious Disease. St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra spoke with the Center’s director Bill Powderly about its mission.

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Engineering - Neuroscience
3:50 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Tiny Implantable LED Devices Help Shed Light On The Brain

These miniaturized LED devices are small enough to safely implant in a mouse brain.
Credit University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign and Washington University-St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed miniaturized electronic devices small enough to safely insert into the brains of live mice. The tiny wireless devices can target specific brain cells and influence behavior.

University of Illinois materials scientist John Rogers co-led the study and helped design the devices. He says they’re on the same size-scale as cells, so they can penetrate far down into the brain.

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Genetic Engineering
5:49 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Wash U Researchers Trick Cells Into Moving Toward Light

Opsin (red dots) in an immune cell prompts it to move toward a light beam (blue bar).
Credit (via WashU/copyright PNAS)

Researchers at Washington University have genetically-engineered cells to react to light.

By taking light-sensing receptors from the eye — called opsins — and inserting them into immune cells, the researchers were able to trick the cells into moving toward a laser beam, in the same way they would move toward a bacterial infection.

Washington University molecular biologist N. Gautam led the research.

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St. Louis on the Air
2:19 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Engaging The Next Generation Of Leaders: Clinton Global Initiative University Comes To St. Louis

President Bill Clinton
UPI

In 2005, President Bill Clinton established the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI).  The goal of the ongoing project is to “create and implement innovative solutions to the world's most pressing challenges.”

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St. Louis on the Air
1:55 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson Unravels The Mysteries of Stonehenge

Photo of Stonehenge taken in 2003
(via Flickr/Rhubarble)

For many years, it’s been thought that Stonehenge, the ancient monolith in southwestern England, was created by Druids around 460 B.C.  

New research shows that is incorrect.  “Even today, a lot of people think Stonehenge is connected to Druids.  We are very certain from radon carbon dating that it happened before,” said British archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson, Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and leader of the Stonehenge Riverside Project.

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