Washington University

Politics
7:53 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Clinton To Visit St. Louis In April

Credit Credit: Adam Schultz / Clinton Global Initiative

Former President Bill Clinton will be in St. Louis next month as part of his Clinton Global Initiative.

The sixth annual Clinton Global Initiative University will be April 5-7 at Washington University. Among the featured speakers will be Clinton's daughter, Chelsea, and comedian Stephen Colbert.
 
The event is expected to include more than 1,000 college students and celebrities discussing things such as education, the environment, human rights and climate change.
 

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Neuroscience Research
2:27 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

First Results From Brain Mapping Project Ready For Download

A map of brain regions associated with language processing in the human cerebral cortex. Yellow and red regions are activated by listening to stories, whereas green and blue regions are more strongly activated by doing mathematical calculations.
Credit D. Barch, M. Harms, G. Burgess for the WU-Minn HCP consortium.

An international brain mapping project led by Washington University has released its first set of results.

The Human Connectome Project is a five-year effort to study brain circuits and how the wiring of the brain relates to human behavior.

Project researchers are working to obtain high-resolution brain scans of 1,200 healthy adults, along with information about their cognitive abilities, personalities, and other characteristics.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:52 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Brain On Fire: Wash U. Alum Describes Encounter With Rare Autoimmune Disease

Author and Washington University graduate Susannah Cahalan
Julie Stapen

In 2009, Susannah Cahalan, a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, was a healthy 24-year old journalist at the New York Post.

One day that year, she found herself alone in a hospital room, strapped to her bed and unable to speak.

Cahalan had no memory, at the time, of her month long hospital stay, hallucinations and violent actions.

“(The doctors) became convinced I had bi-polar disorder,” she told host Don Marsh.

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Cancer Research
11:52 am
Tue February 19, 2013

St. Louis To Participate In National Cancer Study

This image shows the 3-D structure of a melanoma (skin cancer) cell.
National Cancer Institute/Sriram Subramaniam

The American Cancer Society is launching a nationwide study to try to better understand the genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to causing cancer.

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Film / Wash. U.
4:30 am
Tue February 19, 2013

After 60 Years, Guggenheim Film Unearthed At Washington University

(via Flickr/Teemu008)

Nearly 60 years ago this week, Washington University launched a 3-year, $20 million capital campaign – at the time, the second-largest by an American university.         

The fundraising effort included a short film called "The Second Century." Its director was Charles Guggenheim, who would later gain fame as a documentarian.

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Other News
9:31 am
Mon February 18, 2013

UNC Chancellor To Become WUSTL Provost

Credit (via Flickr/kennedy22)

The chancellor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill is leaving to become provost of Washington University in St. Louis.

Holden Thorp said in an email Monday to students, faculty and staff, that the new job would allow him to teach and do research while serving as chief academic officer of Washington University.

Forty-eight-year-old Thorp announced in September he would step down as chancellor at the end of the academic year. He said he would return to the classroom.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Missour-ee Or Missour-uh? Talking About Talking In St. Louis And Beyond

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Is it Missour-ee or Missour-uh?

Those two pronunciations of the state, according to linguist John Baugh of Washington University in St. Louis, peacefully co-exist and are “indicative of all of the linguistic collisions from the rest of the country that happen in our wonderful city.”

Baugh and linguist Cindy Brantmeier of Washington University joined host Don Marsh to talk about how language forms, evolves, and is spoken differently throughout the United States.

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Breast Cancer
2:31 pm
Fri December 7, 2012

Wash U. Research Findings Could Be Good News To Some Breast Cancer Patients

The top image shows untreated breast cancer cells with HER2 mutations. The bottom image shows how much these cells shrink after treatment with neratinib, an anti-HER2 drug currently in clinical trials.
(via Washington University in St. Louis/Shyam Kavuri, Ph. D.)

The findings of new breast cancer research from Washington University could result in effective treatment for 4,000 additional patients in the United States each year. Scientists made the discovery after analyzing DNA sequencing data from 1,500 patients.

The research appears in the latest edition of Cancer Discovery.

So what does this research mean?

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Translational Medicine
12:41 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Wash U. Gets $50M To Help Turn Research Findings Into Better Health

Washington University School of Medicine

Washington University School of Medicine has received a $50 million federal grant aimed at turning research findings into improvements in human health.

The grant is the renewal of an award from the National Institutes of Health. It will support Wash U's Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS), one of 60 such centers in the U.S.

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Human Genetics
5:55 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

International Consortium Sequences 1000 Human Genomes

Adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine (abbreviated ATCG) are the four nucleotide bases that make up DNA.
Jane Ades, NHGRI

An international consortium of researchers has sequenced the genomes of more than 1000 people, creating the largest catalog yet of human genetic variation.

Richard Wilson directs the Washington University Genome Institute, one of four major research institutions involved in the 1000 Genomes Project.

He says researchers identified rare genetic variants that may eventually explain why some people are more susceptible to certain diseases like cancer or Alzheimer’s.

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