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Washington University

This year produced promising medical advances in the battle against Alzheimer's disease. First came word that scientists had come up with a new test for making more precise diagnoses of the disease. That news was followed this month by the announcement of a discovery of a relationship between an abnormal level of a plaque-forming substance in the brain and Alzheimer's.

Both developments are said to be important to long-term efforts to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's with new drugs even before the disease's symptoms become apparent in patients.

New 2010 U.S. Census figures will be released tomorrow.  And that could be bad news for the St. Louis region.

Curran | Flickr

Ventilation systems failed to remove nicotine from smoke-filled air in restaurants and bars in the area, according to a study released Wednesday by Washington University researchers.

University representatives used the results of the study on Wednesday to argue that ventilation systems are ineffective at removing nicotine, putting customers and workers at risk for health problems that include cancer and cardiovascular disease. And they cited the research as the first objective study in St. Louis lending support to comprehensive smoking ban legislation.

Although as a kid it was anathema to proclaim my delight in the first day of school, I was thrilled when Labor Day finally rolled around. It meant summer vacation was finally over.

A federal judge's ruling striking down the Obama administration's policy on embryonic stem cell research could result in an immediate halt for now in this kind of medical work in Missouri and nationally, according to some local and national proponents of the research.

That view was reinforced late yesterday by news that the National Institutes of Health has imposed a nationwide freeze on grants in the pipeline. That decision could affect research underway at both Washington University and the University of Missouri at Columbia.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 7, 2008 - The assault on the corporate independence of Anheuser-Busch calls to mind the shifting winds of power and influence in the metropolitan area and its possible connection to articulating a future vision and mission for St. Louis.

The era in which August Busch partnered with downtown bankers and other corporate moguls to organize Civic Progress as the priority setter and weathervane for St. Louis appears to be waning. In addition to the absence of home-owned big banks, the corporate stage is less local and more national or even global. Thus the erstwhile focus on the local community among the large corporate chiefs is far less intense.

A dom for the Wash U lawschool courtyard - 33 pxls, 2008
David Kilper | WUSTL Photo Services | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: You might think an injunction would be required to shut down a major American law school for a day. But Monday, the locks were thrown and faculty and students were told to go home not because of legal action but because of the installation of a two-part, 60-ton framework atop the Washington University School of Law’s Anheuser-Busch Hall.

These tiny books are less than one inch.
Provided by Washington University

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Most people are well aware that size has nothing to do with worth. Treasure can be made up of small, but precious objects. For all too many St. Louisans, it will take a bit of a treasure hunt to find a marvelous new exhibit that shows off tiny masterpieces.

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