Washington University

Sept. 11: a decade later
6:35 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Wash U: research against bioterrorism progressing, ten years after 9/11

U.S. Navy personnel take samples from a mock anthrax pile during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological (CBR) decontamination drill aboard an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf in 2007.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kyle Steckler)

Soon after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, letters laced with anthrax started appearing in the U.S. mail, killing five people and sickening 17 others.

The incidents triggered a surge in research dedicated to preventing future bioterrorism attacks.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra spoke with Washington University virologist David Wang about his research on emerging infectious diseases, and how his work is helping to combat bioterrorism.

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Wash. U. / Health / Obesity
10:22 am
Thu September 1, 2011

Website on obesity policy launched by Wash. U., Missouri Foundation for Health

(via Flickr/Dani Lurie)

Washington University's Center for Obesity Prevention and Policy Research and the Missouri Foundation for Health have launched a "first-of-its-kind" website with information on obesity-related policy for organizations across the state.

The site, named "Policy Lift" has a variety of different functions, as an announcement about the site describes:

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Health - lead paint
11:02 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Washington University cited for lead paint violation

(Image courtesy of the Environmental Protection Agency)

The Environmental Protection Agency is fining Washington University for failing to tell tenants about lead paint hazards in some of its married student housing units. The violation will cost the university close to $28,000.

The civil settlement involves three rental apartments northeast of Washington University’s Danforth campus.

The consent agreement says that between 2008 and 2010, the university failed to tell student tenants about previous citations for lead paint violations from the City of St. Louis Health Department.

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Morning round-up
9:28 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Morning headlines: Tuesday, August 23, 2011

A car remains on its top, three days after a tornado devistated the area of Bridgeton, Missouri on April 25, 2011.
UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Mo. state senators meet today to examine natural disasters

A special Senate committee that was created this summer is scheduled to meet today in the state Capitol building. So far in 2011, Missouri has been hit by a historic blizzard, powerful tornadoes in Joplin, St. Louis and Sedalia and heavy flooding along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. The Senate committee was created to recommend ways the Legislature can help with local recovery efforts.

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Medical research
3:05 pm
Sat May 28, 2011

Wash U zebrafish facility opens doors to large-scale genetic research, collaboration

The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a tropical freshwater fish belonging to the minnow family.
(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Washington University is now home to one of the largest zebrafish research facilities in the world.

The one-inch long, striped tropical fish serve as models for studying human development and disease, from birth defects to heart disease to cancer.

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Breast Cancer Study
5:27 pm
Mon May 9, 2011

Wash U. study: estrogen-reducing drugs may reduce need for mastectomy in breast cancer patients

Mammograms of estrogen-receptor positive breast tumors before and after 16 weeks of aromatase inhibitor therapy. The top images: a tumor that responded to the treatment and regressed. The lower images: a resistant tumor that stayed about the same size.
(Washington University School of Medicine/ Matthew J. Ellis)

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have shown that estrogen-lowering drugs can help reduce the need for mastectomy in some breast cancer patients.

Estrogen is known to increase tumor growth in the majority of breast cancer patients.

In a new study, post-menopausal women with large breast cancer tumors were given one of three estrogen-lowering drugs before surgery.

Study lead Dr. Matthew Ellis says all three drugs were equally effective in shrinking tumors and reducing the need for complete breast removal.

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Brain Health
3:00 pm
Wed April 6, 2011

Exposure to welding fumes may lead to impaired brain function

Brain scans from a control subject (left), a welder (center), and a subject with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (right), in a study by researchers at Washington University comparing brains of apparently healthy welders to those of Parkinson's patients.
(via Neurology ®)

Workers exposed to the metal manganese in welding fumes may be at increased risk of developing Parkinson’s-like symptoms, including loss of motor control and tremors.

That’s the finding of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine, who compared brain scans of apparently healthy welders to those of Parkinson’s patients.

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Juan Williams
11:50 pm
Mon April 4, 2011

Williams continues to push for federal defunding of NPR

Juan Williams, shown here speaking at the Chautauqua Institute in 2007, repeated his call during an availability with reporters in St. Louis yesterday for the federal defunding of NPR.
(via Flickr/Pete Wright)

Former NPR contributor Juan Williams used an availability with reports before a Monday event at Washington University to repeat his claim that the network would better serve its journalistic values if it gave up government funding.

NPR may be selective in the voices it uses to tell stories, Williams said, often excluding those with a more conservative point of view. But with the voices it uses, it produces quality journalism.

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Thomas Jefferson's Books at Washington University
11:45 am
Mon February 21, 2011

Books from Thomas Jefferson's personal collection found in Wash. U. library

A scrap of paper with Greek notes in Thomas Jefferson’s hand was found tucked in a volume of Plutarch’s Lives. (Joe Angeles, Washington University in St. Louis)

Washington University in St. Louis, named for the first American president, announced this President’s Day, the discovery of a tie to another president.

The university recently learned that its libraries have a collection of books originally owned by Thomas Jefferson.

The 28 titles, including 74 volumes, were donated to Washington University in 1880, with no mention of their provenance.

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Morning round-up
8:37 am
Fri January 28, 2011

Morning headlines: Jim Talent will not challenge McCaskill in 2012, Bristol Palin will not speak at WUSTL, Coleman will try to keep video statements from jury

Former U. S. Senator Jim Talent announced that he will not challenge Claire McCaskill in 2012. (Jim Talent for U.S. Senate Web site)

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