Washington University

(via Washington University in St. Louis/Shyam Kavuri, Ph. D.)

The findings of new breast cancer research from Washington University could result in effective treatment for 4,000 additional patients in the United States each year. Scientists made the discovery after analyzing DNA sequencing data from 1,500 patients.

The research appears in the latest edition of Cancer Discovery.

So what does this research mean?

Washington University School of Medicine

Washington University School of Medicine has received a $50 million federal grant aimed at turning research findings into improvements in human health.

The grant is the renewal of an award from the National Institutes of Health. It will support Wash U's Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS), one of 60 such centers in the U.S.

Jane Ades, NHGRI

An international consortium of researchers has sequenced the genomes of more than 1000 people, creating the largest catalog yet of human genetic variation.

Richard Wilson directs the Washington University Genome Institute, one of four major research institutions involved in the 1000 Genomes Project.

He says researchers identified rare genetic variants that may eventually explain why some people are more susceptible to certain diseases like cancer or Alzheimer’s.

Robert Boston/Washington University

A popular supplement made from a component of red wine may not be beneficial after all – at least if you’re healthy to start with.

That’s according to a new study out of Washington University – the first to test the potential benefits of resveratrol in healthy people.

(via Flickr/kennedy22)

Clinical depression is called the world’s number one mental disorder and ranks only behind heart disease as the country’s most disabling condition.  It is also dangerous because it can all too often lead to suicide.  Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation have committed $20 million to Washington University to fund research on mental illness, with a sharp focus on depression.

(Courtesy Ian Nichols)

For more than a decade, Washington University anthropologist Crickette Sanz and Lincoln Park Zoo research conservationist David Morgan have lived and worked in a remote stretch of forest in Africa’s Congo Basin, studying chimpanzees and gorillas.

Together with local Congolese, they founded the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project, whose mission is to study and protect great apes and their habitat.

Sanz and Morgan are giving a talk about their work tonight at the St. Louis Zoo — they spoke with St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra.

Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Tyler Blazey/Washington University

Washington University will soon lead a clinical trial aimed at preventing people with Alzheimer’s disease from developing dementia.

The international trial will involve 160 patients in the U.S., Europe, and Australia who have a very rare, inherited form of Alzheimer’s, which typically causes dementia before age 50.

Washington University neurologist and study lead Dr. Randall Bateman says this is one of the first clinical trials to try to treat Alzheimer’s patients before they have any symptoms.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Washington University is hosting a conference tomorrow afternoon on public health challenges in the 21st century.

Melissa Jonson-Reid directs Wash U's Brown Center for Violence and Injury Prevention.

She says one challenge the conference will take on is the problem of violence in St. Louis, and the role local public health professionals can play in addressing it.

Washington University School of Medicine

Washington University School of Medicine has received a $20 million donation to establish a new center for psychiatric research.

The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research will focus on developing new and more effective therapies for psychiatric disorders. Researchers will start by studying neurosteroids, chemicals in the brain that help regulate thinking and emotion. Changes in levels of neurosteroids can be linked to mood disorders, chronic pain, epilepsy, or Alzheimer’s disease.

US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Finding effective treatments and a cure for Alzheimer’s disease is elusive.  While most of what we hear about the disease is depressing, we may be on the threshold of some exciting discoveries concerning prevention.  Washington University’s School of Medicine is in the middle of this new research and this hour, host Don Marsh is joined by Dr. John Morris, Director of Washington University’s Alzheimer’s Research Center, to talk about clinical trials aimed at preventing Alzheimer’s disease.