We Live Here | St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here

“We Live Here,” a popular podcast from St. Louis Public Radio exploring race and class in the St. Louis region, is back on Tuesday with the first episode in its third season. The style of the show has changed over the course of its first two seasons, but season three marks the most dramatic shift.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and PRX announce the third season of the awarding-winning podcast We Live Here, highlighted by a relaunch party Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 7-9 p.m.

Normandy Superintendent Charles Pearson agreed to a list of principles to reduce suspensions on Saturday, May 23, 2015.
File photo | Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Nov. 14 9:45 a.m. with results of the assembly — By the 2018-2019 school year at least four school districts in the St. Louis area could have policies banning out of school suspensions for their youngest students.

At a regional assembly on suspensions Sunday evening, the Maplewood Richmond Heights School District pledged to ban out of school suspensions for pre-K through 3rd grade next school year. Ladue and Normandy committed to doing the same the following year. St. Louis Public Schools enacted their own ban this school year.

A slide from a presentation during an April 2015  fair housing conference shows how Section 8 vouchers are concentrated in north St. Louis and north St. Louis County, and that most voucher holders are black.
courtesy Poverty & Race Research Action Council

Housing officials have spent months educating renters and landlords about a new St. Louis ordinance — one designed to protects those using government rental vouchers.

But, according to the Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council, some landlords are still ignoring the rule and denying homes to people who get the government's help to pay their bills.

New UM diversity officer Kevin McDonald
University of Missouri

Monday’s St. Louis on the Air featured two exciting segments. First, we aired the season two premiere of the St. Louis Public Radio podcast We Live Here. Want to stay up-to-date on the podcast? Check out its new website here.

Following the premiere, the University of Missouri System’s newly named, first-ever chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer, Kevin McDonald, joined us to discuss some of the issues that We Live Here delves into as well as his plans for the new role. You can read about McDonald’s background here.

Graphic of woman on crutches overlooking treacherous landscpe
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

In this rerun of We Live Here, we examine the concept of toxic stress and learn how managing patients who experience it is challenging for doctors and for the patients themselves.

Emanuele Berry
Provided by Emanuele Berry

We originally aired this podcast on what its like to be multi-racial about six months ago. The project was the brainchild of Emanuele Berry, one of the founding producers of We Live Here, and it's still one of our favorite episodes — not just because we miss Emanuele (who is on a Fulbright in Macau, China), but also because the stories and interactions in this podcast are poignant and thought provoking.

Will Rivers and Brandon King on the scene at the race summit
Courtesy Jane Bannester / Ritneour High School.

We're getting close to launching our next season of We Live Here with more episodes about education, housing, economics and a host of other topics.

But we're still needing a little more time, so we're reminding you of a show we did early on -- about kids and the way they learn to talk to each other about race. 

 

On Oct. 10, students blocked a car carrying former University of Missouri system president Tim Wolfe during Mizzou's homecoming parade
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

We first aired this podcast about race at Mizzou last November, just after a series of protests at the University of Missouri's flagship campus led to the resignation of its system president, Tim Wolfe. 

North Side community school classroom
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio | file photo

The We Live Here team is still on hiatus, creating new episodes for our second season. Meanwhile, we revisit one of our favorites from season one

A single school can tell us a lot about the health of the community in which it exists. It can also tell us a lot about how systemic problems with transportation, food, housing and crime adversely impact impoverished communities and the health of the people who live there.   

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

You know Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley from their work as hosts of the “We Live Here” podcast that covers race and culture for St. Louis Public Radio. On Monday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” we recapped some of the most memorable moments of the podcast’s first season. We also looked ahead at what is to come and how Stanley is settling into St. Louis (she moved here from Florida in September).

"So far, St. Louis has been really good to me," Stanley said.

A cartoon rendering that explains the concept of collateral consequences.
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

First a definition: Hiatus, noun, a break or interruption in the continutity of a work, series, action., etc. 

We aren't giving you this definition to insult your intelligence. Rather, we are defining the word to let you know that the We Live Here crew is taking a hiatus. And it really will be a short break, so that we can bring you fresh, informative and thought-provoking shows in our second season starting in March.

Askia Hameed, resident imam at Al-Muminoon Masjid in St. Louis: "'’Oh you who believe, stand out firmly for Allah as witnesses to fair dealing.  And let not the hatred of others to you make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. '"
Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio

For our holiday episode, we talked to faith leaders about their experiences addressing race with their congregations.

 

We wanted to know if they felt obligated to address race (many said yes); whether parishioners were receptive (sometimes); and why it was or was not an important part of their ministry (you’ll have to listen to the show to find out).

 

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s the holiday season, and like many of you, we’re taking stock.  

Taking stock of what we accomplished with this We Live Here project; the stories and topics we’ve covered; and where we hope to go in the future.   

As homicides continue to tick up in St. Louis, many officials say gun violence should be approached as a public health issue.
Tony Webster | Flickr

The nationwide debate about gun control, mass shootings, and violent crime was once again jump-started in the wake of recent massacres at a county center in California and at a Planned Parenthood in Colorado that left several people dead.

But here in St. Louis, officials are concerned with a different type of gun violence — the kind that happens almost routinely and usually takes one life at a time.

On Oct. 10, students blocked a car carrying former University of Missouri system president Tim Wolfe during Mizzou's homecoming parade
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

This week’s show started with a simple question we could not get out of our heads as we followed the recent shakeups at Mizzou.

University of Missouri-Columbia

The activist group Concerned Student 1950 has vowed to keep pushing for change in the wake of resignations by both the University of Missouri system President, Tim Wolfe, and chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin.

Nine Network of Public Media

Updated 12:15 p.m., Nov. 5 with audio from the town hall—More than 100 educators, parents and students came together Wednesday, Oct. 28, to talk about the longstanding racial disparities in school suspensions in Missouri.

The state has grappled with the issue for several years, earning headlines in recent years for having the nation’s highest suspension rates.


Robert Dillon, director of innovation for the Affton School District
courtesy photo

Racial disparities are a huge topic in education. And Missouri schools — specifically those in the St. Louis area — have been singled out as having some of the nation’s highest rates of suspensions that are disproportionately allocated to African Americans. 

Over the next few weeks we’ll be bringing you stories of people directly participating in that system. This week, we spoke to educators, who shared their own journeys of grappling with issues of race, poverty and discipline in local schools. 

Jennings Superintendent Tiffany Anderson takes her turn as a crossing guard.
Jennings School District

The arcane world of school finance in Missouri can be harder to understand than the most obscure poem or the most difficult calculus problem. But clear away all of the acronyms and calculations and modifications, and it comes down to two simple questions:

Should the quality of children’s education depend on where they live? And how important is money to education anyway?

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This is Kameel Stanley's inaugural article for St. Louis Public Radio's We Live Here project. We asked her to introduce herself. Here is what she wrote:

Two things have consistently come up since I moved to St. Louis a few weeks ago.

Namely, my roots and my race.

Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

It’s Labor Day, and like many of you, we’re taking the day off to enjoy some extra time with friends and family.

As we settle in for our backyard barbecues, we can't help but think about a major theme that’s run through almost all the episodes of We Live Here: Because of the way St. Louis is structured, black, white, rich and poor people rarely live next to each other.

Emanuele Berry
Provided by Emanuele Berry

This week's We Live Here podcast is something a little different.

Recently, we've been looking at health and the way that toxic stress can impact someone's ability to succeed and even to be healthy. We'll be transitioning to a new area soon, but we wanted to take a step back this week to allow Emanuele Berry to produce her own, unique show.

Willis Arnold / St. Louis Public Radio

This isn’t the Ferguson show.

It’s a mantra we adopted when we launched We Live Here back in February.  Now, to be clear, Ferguson is what prompted St. Louis Public Radio to start this show in the first place.  No doubt about it. But racial and economic fault lines stretch far beyond a north St. Louis County municipality with 21,000 residents.   Peering into — and exploring ways to bridge — those deep, historic divides is what this show is all about. 

Little boy trying spinach.
Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

A single school is like an entire community.

You've got the mayor, or principal. There is the general population, the students and their parents. There's a grocery store in the form of a cafeteria. And the teachers are kind of like doctors and police officers rolled into one. Within that batch of characters, there are gossips and scofflaws; actors and judges; even engineers and critics.

A farewell to St. Louis Public Radio’s Emanuele Berry

Jul 27, 2015
Emanuele Berry
Provided by Emanuele Berry

During her St. Louis Public Radio Race, Culture and Diversity Fellowship, Emanuele Berry has reported in this city at a dynamic and critical time. As her year-long fellowship comes to a close, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh spoke with Berry about her work in St. Louis and her next steps.

Reporting on Ferguson

Graphic of woman on crutches overlooking treacherous landscpe
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

There are a few things we know about health care that are true for everyone. For one thing, it's expensive. It's a nearly $3 trillion industry in the U.S. Also, it's not easy to do well.

Karen Aroesty of the Anti-Defamation League leads a diversity awareness training for police cadets.
Nancy Fowler

A year of unrest and turmoil has yielded the beginnings of change in St. Louis — along with a whole lot of questions.

How do we untangle the deep, gnarly roots of racism? What is this thing called privilege? How do people of different races talk to each other about this stuff?

Local organizations that help people think through these issues report a significant increase in requests for diversity training since the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer.

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

Imagine you're looking at a map of the St. Louis region. Now fold that map in half horizontally.

Below the fold, you'd mostly see healthy people living long lives, having no trouble finding doctors or hospitals or fresh fruit and vegetables. Above the fold, you'd see a different, starker picture. Above the fold, there are fewer healthy people, higher rates of infant mortality and few hospitals.   

Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City was closed in 2004.
Dustin Holmes | Flickr

There are about 1.5 million people in federal and state prisons in the United States, according to a U.S. Department of Justice 2013 count. That is more than the population of St. Louis County and city combined.

They are locked up for burglary, assault, murder or numerous other crimes. A sliver of that population will remain in prison for life. But the vast majority are released at some point. How does someone adjust to life outside after spending years behind bars?

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