William Lacy Clay

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay speaks with Rhonda and John Kiely at the health insurance resource fair at the St. Ann Community Center on Saturday, November 15, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay says he hopes more Missourians sign up for health insurance this year, now that the second year of open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act has begun.

More than 150,000 Missourians signed up for insurance last year—about half of those eligible. 

To mark the first day of open enrollment, the congressman visited a resource fair Saturday at the St. Ann Community Center in north St. Louis County. On-site navigators helped people sign up for health insurance, as vendors sold barbecue and salsa music played.

Senate Democrats return to Washington Wednesday morning knowing that their time in the majority will expire in just a few weeks. 

The lame duck session starts Wednesday and ends before Christmas, with a Thanksgiving holiday in between. The new Congress, with its Senate Republican majority of 52 seats, starts shortly after the New Year. The House remains firmly in Republican hands.

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay and state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, both University City Democrats, were on opposing sides during St. Louis County’s battle for county executive.

But you might not guess it from their post-election assessments.

Both are proclaiming victory.

While Clay’s candidate — fellow Democrat Steve Stenger — won on Nov. 4, Chappelle-Nadal is celebrating victory as well, because the Republican she endorsed,  Rick Stream, came close.

“It was a cool win, it was beautiful,’’ said Chappelle-Nadal, who appeared in a TV ad for Stream.

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay has endorsed Jennifer Florida for St. Louis recorder of deeds, putting the congressman in the middle of a complicated contest.

Florida, a former alderman, was appointed by Mayor Francis Slay this summer to hold the office  after longtime incumbent Sharon Carpenter was forced to step down over nepotism charges.

Carpenter remained in the Aug. 5 Democratic primary and won. Florida was named too late to be in the primary, and filed instead as an independent candidate on next Tuesday’s ballot

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, left, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Attorney General Eric Holder met on Wednesday to talk about the killing of Michael Brown.
Provided by the office of Rep. Clay

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, has asked the Justice Department to investigate municipal courts in St. Louis and St. Louis County.  

In his letter to Acting Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, Clay wrote that “the court system operates mostly as a revenue source for the state and county, with little oversight.”

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis City
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated 5:50 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15)

The region’s most prominent African-American official -- U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay – has announced that he's no longer on the political fence, and now is endorsing fellow Democrat Steve Stenger for St. Louis County executive. 

Clay said on KMOX radio Wednesday morning that fellow African-Americans backing Republican Rick Stream were ignoring their best interests.

“It’s time for us to bring the temperature down and allow for us to make a rational decision,” Clay said.

Wikipedia

Missouri voters will make decisions this fall on who will fill all eight of the state’s congressional districts.

But as it stands, there’s little debate over who likely will win.

All eight of the state’s incumbents in the U.S. House are in seats that – thanks to the 2011 redistricting – heavily favor one party or the other. As a result, none of them faces well-funded challengers this fall.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

It is the black-tie event for prominent African Americans, and this year the parents of Michael Brown Jr., the unarmed black teenager killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, are scheduled to attend the closing gala of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s annual conference in Washington, D.C. 

After facing intense heat from some of his party’s African-American leaders, Gov. Jay Nixon is tapping a former St. Louis-area senator to serve as a liaison to the state’s poor and minority communities. 

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus used an hour of so-called special orders on the House floor Monday night to draw attention to troubles confronting minorities across the U.S. with special attention paid to the recent unrest in Ferguson., Missouri. 

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, opened his comments by saying the pain felt in Ferguson following the shooting death of Michael Brown “has stirred the conscience of the nation and has forced us to confront some very difficult truths.” 

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Although the Missouri Highway Patrol is overseeing the police presence in Ferguson, it quickly has become apparent that neither the patrol nor Gov. Jay Nixon is in control of all law-enforcement actions.

That lack of control already is leading to unwanted surprises that revolve around a central question:  Who is in charge?

That question also applies to St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley and County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch, who are battling over who should control a local probe into the police shooting of teenager Michael Brown. 

Bill Greenblatt, UPI

St. Louis Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed has an idea about what’s driving the frustration about Michael Brown’s death. 

As federal and local investigations into Brown’s shooting death unfold, Reed said more and more people want details and quick action. They want to know what really happened when a Ferguson police officer shot the 18-year-old last Saturday.

“We need to get some information out, some good solid information out,” said Reed on St. Louis on the Air on Monday. “The people need to know what direction we’re taking. Not we, but the department is taking.”

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics.  This week, we dive into last night's election results.

The Politically Speaking crew broke down the results from Tuesday's primary elections. Among other things, the trio examined:

State Rep. Joshua Peters, D-St. Louis, campaigns in the Penrose neighborhood of St. Louis. Peters is running for re-election in the 76th District, which encompasses a portion of north St. Louis City.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a slightly overcast day in St. Louis’ Penrose neighborhood, state Rep. Joshua Peters briskly moved from brick bungalow to brick bungalow to get the word out about his re-election campaign.   

Sporting a sky blue polo and dark-rimmed eyeglasses, the 26-year-old exuded the experience of an old political pro when greeting potential voters. Sophia Hubbard told Peters a member of his campaign staff had already come to her door. Oliver Williams told him something similar – and signaled that Peters had his vote on Aug. 5.

Congressman Lacy Clay
File photo

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, may be at odds with House Budget chairman Paul Ryan when it comes to many issues – notably, federal spending.

But Clay offered up a written invitation to Ryan, R-Wisc., on Wednesday that’s based on one thing the two do have in common. They’re both Catholic.

Clay cited their faith’s strong focus on helping the poor in a personal invitation – hand-delivered to Ryan – that encourages the 2012 GOP vice presidential nominee to come to St. Louis.

Clay also made clear his motive for the invite.

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

Amidst the dual crises of the partial government shutdown and the swiftly approaching debt limit, Congressman Lacy Clay (D - St. Louis) is addressing the inaction and hearing from constituents.

Before traveling back to D.C. for an evening meeting of the House, Clay stopped by St. Louis Public Radio to discuss the latest on Capitol Hill with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Here's what he had to say on the partial government shutdown, the debt ceiling and more.

On the inaction of Congress:

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

Big political weight was behind two NorthSide Regeneration bills that went before a St. Louis aldermanic committee Tuesday morning, but no vote was taken after four aldermen failed to attend.

(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

Members of Missouri and Illinois' Congressional delegations are weighing in on the U.S. House version of the Farm Bill, which could be voted on before week's end.

Illinois Republican Rodney Davis told reporters today via conference call that the bill is a big improvement over the version passed by the Democrat-controlled U.S. Senate.

(Photo by Bill Raack/St. Louis Public Radio)

Congressman Lacy Clay of St. Louis says the federal government may soon be able to help local police as they try to combat crime in some parts of the city.

The St. Louis Police Department has recently reassigned some officers to so-called “hot spots” where violent crime continues to be a problem. Clay says there should be announcements in the next few months about combined federal-and-local crime-fighting efforts.

Gun crimes increasing problem for St. Louis police

Aug 27, 2012
Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

Seeking to reassure the public that St. Louis City is taking action to curb a recent spate of gun-related crime, City Hall announced on Monday several measures designed to target problem neighborhoods.

Police Chief Dan Isom has isolated 12 focus neighborhoods, 8 of which are located in North St. Louis, 2 in central city and 2 in the south.

Starting last weekend Isom says he is also shifting work schedules to move officers from day to evening patrol.

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