William Lacy Clay

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Clay beats Carnahan

In a battle of political dynasties, Congressman William Lacy Clay emerged victorious over fellow incumbent Russ Carnahan Tuesday.

Clay won the Democratic primary to represent the party in the new 1st Congressional District. In a campaign that was often bitter, Clay repeatedly accused Carnahan of going negative with a string of attack ads, but says the strategy didn't work.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Missouri primaries are today

Eight U.S. House members are asking voters for a chance at two more years in Washington. Thanks to new congressional district boundaries, at least one of those incumbents won't prevail. St. Louis Democrats Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay Jr. lead a three-way race for their party's nomination in Missouri's 1st District.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

One of the biggest match-ups in next Tuesday’s primary will pit Congressman Russ Carnahan against fellow Democrat William ‘Lacy’ Clay to represent the party in the 1st Congressional District.

The two incumbents are have waged heated, and at times spiteful campaigns. The upshot is one less Democrat in Washington for Missouri, and city voters will choose between two well-established political dynasties.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The two Democrats battling for the U.S. House seat in the city of St. Louis say they'll put their differences behind them for the good of the party following the primary election next week.

Congressmen Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay appeared together on Newsradio 1120 KMOX on Monday for their only debate of the primary season.

The debate covered very little new ground, with Carnahan continuing his claims that Clay actively worked against him to eliminate the 3rd District, the seat Carnahan currently holds.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

In the remaining days before the August primary St. Louis City Democrats remain divided between two candidates from well-established political pedigrees.

Democrat Russ Carnahan is challenging William Lacy Clay to represent the 1st Congressional District, which now comprises the entire city of St. Louis.

Carnahan says Clay sold out Democrats by passively endorsing Republican redistricting maps which erased Carnahan’s 3rd District and preserved Clays.

via Clay campaign

Updated 4:35 p.m. with Carnahan response

Missouri Congressman Lacy Clay continues to hurl a number of criticisms at Congressman Russ Carnahan, as they vie for the Democratic nomination for the 1st Congressional District.

During a press conference Friday at the IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers) Training Center in south St. Louis, the Democratic incumbent accused Carnahan of selling out workers by voting for the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri congressmen Lacy Clay and Russ Carnahan have some differences of opinion when it comes to the potential political impact of their Democratic primary battle. 

Both are running for the Democratic nomination in the 1st congressional district, which Clay has represented since 2001. Carnahan decided to challenge Clay after Carnahan’s south St. Louis city and county district was split up following the 2010 census. Clay calls the situation “unfortunate".

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Per Clay spokesman Steven Engelhardt, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is endorsing Rep. William "Lacy" Clay (D-St. Louis) in the 1st District congressional primary in St. Louis.

Clay faces Rep. Russ Carnahan (D-St. Louis).

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

A massive tornado tore through the St. Louis area a year ago this Sunday. Lambert Airport was hit particularly hard, but few signs of the damage remain today.  

Congressman Lacy Clay of St. Louis recalls seeing the airport just hours after the tornado struck on Good Friday.

“Once I got to the airport, I could not believe all of the glass that was blown out of the structure," Clay said. "And then looking at the parking lot: seeing the cars and vans that were on top of each other. It was just amazing.”

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Congressmen Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay are on similar financial footing heading into a Democratic primary in St. Louis.

Reports filed with the Federal Election Commission show Carnahan raised more money than Clay during the past quarter and has slightly more in his campaign account.

Carnahan raised nearly $145,000 from January through March, while Clay raised nearly $84,000. Both spent most of that money.

At the end of the period, Carnahan had $488,481 in his campaign account compared with $406,066 for Clay.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

Rev. Al Sharpton is joining Missouri Congressman Lacy Clay in opposing efforts to require voters to show photo IDs at the polls.  

Last year, Republicans in 38 states introduced legislation that would require a state-approved photo ID to vote. Seven states have since signed it into law.

Sharpton joined Clay in St. Louis Friday at a voter rights forum to oppose a similar law from passing in Missouri.  “We've got to turn this around," Sharpton said. "And start targeting in Missouri those legislators that are targeting our right to vote,” he said.

(Official Photo)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says she is not involved in negotiations between St. Louis Congressmen Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay.

Carnahan’s 3rd District was drawn out of existence following the 2010 census and he has filed in the 1st Congressional District. That seat is currently held by Clay, who also filed for re-election.

McCaskill had reportedly said she was hopeful that something would be worked out because such a primary would be hard on the party.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Originally posted at 9 a.m. Updated at 1:45 p.m. with comments from Carnahan, Clay and analysts.

A potentially nasty Democratic primary is brewing in the St. Louis area.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Late Friday afternoon, William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, announced that the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, also known as the Gateway Arch and its grounds, has received a federal transportation grant. The grant will help fund engineering and planning for a pedestrian connector linking the Arch and downtown St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

It's been a bad year for the John Cochran Veterans Administration Medical Center in St. Louis.

Carnahan keeping options open for 2012

Jul 18, 2011
(via Flickr/cvrcak1)

St. Louis Congressman Russ Carnahan says he has every intention of running for congress next year despite losing his seat to redistricting.

So far the elimination of his 3rd District has done little to tamp down Carnahan’s fundraising, having brought in more than a half million dollars since January.

Without saying which district he’s looking at Carnahan says there may yet be a legal challenge to the new congressional maps, which currently favor the GOP.

John A Cochran hospital
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File photo

Representatives Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay were among the government officials with sharp criticism today for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Carnahan and Ohio Republican Michael Turner, who represents the Dayton area, pushed for the House Veterans Affairs Commitee hearing to address concerns about the cleanliness of instruments at VA hospitals.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A GOP-chaired House committee on redistricting has released the first map showing how Missouri’s congressional districts may soon look.

Missouri is losing a seat in Congress, dropping from nine to eight, based on figures from the 2010 census.

(Wikimedia Commons/Online Guide to House Members and Senators)

Though he says a government shutdown would be "tragic," Missouri Democrat William Lacy Clay says he doesn't expect Republicans and Democrats to be able to reach an agreement on a budget for this year before a temporary spending plan expires next Friday.

The extension is the sixth since the federal budget expired in September 2010. And Clay says the U.S. House is in "total disarray," with Congressional Republicans choosing to advance policies simply to hurt the Obama administration.

(Screenshot via Mo. Sec. of State website)

State politicians were in St. Louis today to solicit public feedback on redrawing Missouri's congressional map from nine districts down to eight.

The outcome may mean a decrease in political clout for the metro region.

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