William Lacy Clay

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

Rev. Al Sharpton is joining Missouri Congressman Lacy Clay in opposing efforts to require voters to show photo IDs at the polls.  

Last year, Republicans in 38 states introduced legislation that would require a state-approved photo ID to vote. Seven states have since signed it into law.

Sharpton joined Clay in St. Louis Friday at a voter rights forum to oppose a similar law from passing in Missouri.  “We've got to turn this around," Sharpton said. "And start targeting in Missouri those legislators that are targeting our right to vote,” he said.

(Official Photo)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says she is not involved in negotiations between St. Louis Congressmen Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay.

Carnahan’s 3rd District was drawn out of existence following the 2010 census and he has filed in the 1st Congressional District. That seat is currently held by Clay, who also filed for re-election.

McCaskill had reportedly said she was hopeful that something would be worked out because such a primary would be hard on the party.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Originally posted at 9 a.m. Updated at 1:45 p.m. with comments from Carnahan, Clay and analysts.

A potentially nasty Democratic primary is brewing in the St. Louis area.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Late Friday afternoon, William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, announced that the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, also known as the Gateway Arch and its grounds, has received a federal transportation grant. The grant will help fund engineering and planning for a pedestrian connector linking the Arch and downtown St. Louis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

It's been a bad year for the John Cochran Veterans Administration Medical Center in St. Louis.

(via Flickr/cvrcak1)

St. Louis Congressman Russ Carnahan says he has every intention of running for congress next year despite losing his seat to redistricting.

So far the elimination of his 3rd District has done little to tamp down Carnahan’s fundraising, having brought in more than a half million dollars since January.

Without saying which district he’s looking at Carnahan says there may yet be a legal challenge to the new congressional maps, which currently favor the GOP.

John A Cochran hospital
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File photo

Representatives Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay were among the government officials with sharp criticism today for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Carnahan and Ohio Republican Michael Turner, who represents the Dayton area, pushed for the House Veterans Affairs Commitee hearing to address concerns about the cleanliness of instruments at VA hospitals.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A GOP-chaired House committee on redistricting has released the first map showing how Missouri’s congressional districts may soon look.

Missouri is losing a seat in Congress, dropping from nine to eight, based on figures from the 2010 census.

(Wikimedia Commons/Online Guide to House Members and Senators)

Though he says a government shutdown would be "tragic," Missouri Democrat William Lacy Clay says he doesn't expect Republicans and Democrats to be able to reach an agreement on a budget for this year before a temporary spending plan expires next Friday.

The extension is the sixth since the federal budget expired in September 2010. And Clay says the U.S. House is in "total disarray," with Congressional Republicans choosing to advance policies simply to hurt the Obama administration.

(Screenshot via Mo. Sec. of State website)

State politicians were in St. Louis today to solicit public feedback on redrawing Missouri's congressional map from nine districts down to eight.

The outcome may mean a decrease in political clout for the metro region.

A 30-year veteran of the United States Postal Service received recognition today for his veteran status of another kind.

91-year-old John T. Moton, Jr. was awarded eight different medals for his service in the United States Navy, KMOV reports.

Congressman Lacy Clay presented the medals in his office this morning and included the following:

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Rep. William Lacy Clay took the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives this morning to give a speech on the tragic shootings in Tucson, Ariz.

Clay expressed his condolences for the victims and others involved, along with an appeal to the media "To remember that hateful words often lead to hateful deeds."