Women in Politics | St. Louis Public Radio

Women in Politics

Local residents (from left) Heather Silverman, Jami Dolby and Kara Wurtz recently ran for city council seats in Creve Coeur, Chesterfield and Kirkwood, respectively.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

“Last year I marched, but this year I run,” Kara Wurtz told her friends and family this past January 21, the day she launched her campaign as a city council candidate in Kirkwood, Missouri. She’s among an increasing number of women getting involved in politics all across the country and the region.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Wurtz and two other women who recently ran for their respective city councils in Chesterfield, Creve Coeur and Kirkwood, Missouri, about what prompted their candidacies and how they hope to engage in their local communities going forward.

via Flickr/MarcNozell

If Hillary Clinton runs for president in 2016, will she win? According to political science professor Farida Jalalzai, the odds are not in Clinton’s favor. Jalalzai recently wrote an article for the Washington Post elaborating on that thought.

Courtesy HarperCollins

At the time of the American Revolution, married women in America were not even allowed to own property, let alone vote. Because women did not sign the Declaration of Independence, serve as generals in the war, or get elected to public office, they are not often mentioned in the history of the time.

But despite their lack of official roles, there were women who helped found our nation through their words and deeds, and through their association with the men who have become known as our Founding Fathers.

Jo Mannies / St. Louis Public Radio & The Beacon

Atima Omara, president of the Young Democrats of America,  is in Missouri this weekend as part of her group’s efforts to avoid a replay of 2010 next year.

In 2010, Republicans made huge election gains, including in Missouri. Credit, or blame, went in part to a sharp decline in turnout among young voters, who as a bloc lean Democratic.

The under-30 age group played a significant role in 2008, when a strong Democratic turnout swept Barack Obama into the White House and resulted in Democrats capturing all but one statewide contest in Missouri.

Hanaway May Run For Missouri Governor In 2016

Sep 24, 2013
(UPI photo)

Former Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway says she's considering running for Governor in 2016.

According to the Associated Press, Hanaway says a lot of people she trusts and respects have been encouraging her to run for Governor.  The Republican from St. Louis County served as Missouri's first female House Speaker from 1999 to 2005, and was the GOP nominee in 2004 for Secretary of State, losing to Democrat Robin Carnahan.  She also served as U.S. Attorney for Missouri's Eastern District, and now practices law in St. Louis.

(via Flickr/marcn)

The United States Senate has 20 women in office, a mark never before reached prior to the last election. The top political seats in New Hampshire are all held by women: a female governor, two women in the U.S. Senate and women in both of the state's U.S. House seats.

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton ran for president in 2008 and there is talk of her running again in 2016. Are these signs that America could soon have a woman break the last glass ceiling to executive power or are there still obstacles in the way?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: October 31, 2008 - Angela Griffin, 24, is a junior majoring in English at UMSL. Griffin's hometown is Richmond, Va. 

College student Angela Griffin was just 3 weeks old in 1984, when Democratic candidate Geraldine Ferraro made American history as the first woman nominated for vice president by a major political party.