Youth | St. Louis Public Radio

Youth

Some of the young men and women at Marygrove Children's Home participate in a  tutoring session. "Unheard Voices" features the stories of just the men who are aging out of the institution.
YourWords STL

Actors will tell the real-life stories of young men aging out of a children’s home in a staged reading on Saturday in Ferguson.

The free event at the Ferguson Youth Initiative, 106 Church St., draws on writing by young men who participated in a program of YourWords STL. The organization helps St. Louis youth express themselves, and work through trauma using the written word.

The presentation, “Unheard Voices: You Don’t Know My Story,” is comprised of poetry, lyrics and narratives by residents of the Marygrove Children’s Home in Florissant.  It highlights the human need to be heard, according to YourWords’ cofounder Anna Guzon, a former physician.

Drawing of child and scales of justice
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County will close a residential facility for young people referred by Family Court at the end of the year. On Friday, several teenagers moved out of the Lakeside Residential Treatment Center for the last time.

County officials cited the cost of repairs to the aging building and low enrollment as reasons for the closure. The 55-bed center provided housing, therapy and education for teens referred as part of their sentencing. The residents will resume classes at Marygrove, a Catholic Charities federated agency, on Jan. 3.

Participants in the Good Journey Development Foundation with mentors and instructors
The Good Journey Development Foundation

If you want to come up with a good idea for teen lives, why not ask a teenager?

That’s what a group called The Good Journey Development Foundation does. A group of 13-to-17-year-olds brainstormed a plan for a center offering employment and education tips, along with life-skills training.

Good Journey recently received $300 in seed money for the project from another organization called Better Billion, working to make St. Louis a better place to live.

On Monday morning, St.  Louisans can hear from the Good Journey kids and other Better Billion winners at the St. Louis Board of Aldermen meeting.

Two child hands pass red and green string through a fence
Provided | Intersect Arts Center

Sarah Bernhardt was seeing a lot of conflict in her south St. Louis neighborhood — moving between day-to-day destinations, and between the kids in her after-school arts program.

Wanting to help foster understanding between young people and their communities, Bernhardt started the Resolve Youth Art Camp for Violence Prevention. It begins Monday at the Intersect Arts Center, 3630 Ohio Ave., where she is the director.

Berhardt and her team of instructors will teach 8- to 14-year-olds how to use dance, photography, and hip-hop to avoid violence in their daily lives.

Younger children, like 11-year-old Tanya Raja, don't have to fast during the month of Ramadan like older Muslims do, but many start practicing at an early age.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

The Islamic holy month of Ramadan, with its daily sun-up to sundown fasts, increased prayer and focus on charity, is drawing to a close. That means there are only a few days left for young Muslims to try to fast for the first time.

Donation funds more STL Youth Jobs for summer

Jun 1, 2016
STL Youth Jobs will offer paid summer work to 450 young people over the next several months, but hopes to increase that number to 500.
STL Youth Jobs

STL Youth Jobs launched the first day of its 2016 summer work program Wednesday, while also announcing it has received a financial boost to fund more positions.

Creative director Andrew Johnson (left), journalist Dominique Shields (middle), and illustrator Najee Person (right) are members of On the Money Magazine's core team.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Dominique Shields said she already had a basic knowledge of how to manage her money thanks largely to her mother, who was her “handbook” growing up. But Shields came to realize that she may have been uniquely lucky to have had that handbook.

“When I first started working here, I didn’t really realize that so many of my peers didn’t have that fundamental information about finances,” Shields said.

To be, and to parent, an LGBTQ teen

Aug 6, 2015
Dr. Wes Crenshaw joined "St. Louis on the Air" in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

It may be easier than ever before for young people to be open and curious about their sexuality; or at least, Julia Poe of Prairie Village, Kansas seems to think so. Poe identifies as bisexual and believes that for people of her generation, coming out is becoming more common and less traumatic—just as same-sex marriage, recently legalized across the country, is increasingly frequent and accepted.

Danielle Kain, 12, catches a football during the first day of summer camp at the Boys & Girls Club at Ferguson Middle School.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Amid bunches of blue balloons, the newest chapter of The Boys & Girls Club of Greater St. Louis held its first day of summer camp at Ferguson Middle School on Monday.

About 200 students — ages 6 to 15 — signed up for the full-day program, which includes outdoor activities, field trips, and classes. In the fall, students aged 6 to 18 will be able to visit for after-school activities.

Blessing Hasan, 14, said her mother signed her up, but she wanted to come for the arts and music classes offered at the camp. Living in Ferguson over the past year has been rough, she said.

Through the Positive Ticketing Program (first started in Canada), North County police will reward kids doing good or showing good behaviors with "tickets" for free food or tickets to events.
Courtesy of Royal Canadian Mounted Police - Wood Buffalo

Under a new program, police in north St. Louis County are handing out "tickets" to young people — for doing good deeds.

The "Positive Ticketing Program" recognizes and rewards young people for making contributions to their community and showing good behavior. In addition to police issuing the "tickets," members of the public, school administrators and clergy can also nominate a young person who has done good works. 

Judy Baxter, via Flickr

A new study shows low-income children in Missouri will have a harder time getting ahead compared with their wealthier peers than those in past decades.

Students at Saint Raphael the Archangel School prepare to leave Wednesday for the March for Life in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy Saint Raphael, via Twitter

The St. Louis Archdiocese is sending a record number of young people to Thursday's annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., since it first began its coordinated "Generation Life" pilgrimage to the event three years ago.

Youth In Old North Organize To Fix Parks

Jan 14, 2015
Old North
Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Torn up nets, fading court lines, unkempt baseball fields, smashed slides, broken pavement, crumbling swing sets and a clogged sprinkler filled with trash and dead animals … these are just some of the problems facing a pair of parks in the Old North neighborhood of St. Louis. Problems area children are campaigning to fix. 

The Youth Council of Old North held a meeting Tuesday evening to campaign for the city to fix Strodtman and Jackson parks. The council, which is made up of young men from the neighborhood, was established this fall.